Skip to main content
  COVID-19 Information and Resources for ECE Students, Faculty, and Staff

Certificate Program

Certificate Instructors

Josh SmithJoshua R. Smith is the Milton and Delia Zeutschel Professor, jointly appointed in the Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering and the Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering at the University of Washington, where he leads Sensor Systems Laboratory. His research focuses on inventing new sensor systems, devising new ways to power and communicate with them, and developing algorithms for using them. The research has applications in the domains of ubiquitous computing, robotics, medical devices and HCI. His group develops novel sensors for robotic manipulation, resonant wireless power transfer, and far-field wirelessly powered sensing platforms.

 

Richard Shi is a professor in the Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering at the University of Washington. His primary research interests relate to computer-aided design and test of VLSI circuits and systems with the emphasis on analog and deep-submicron circuit modeling, simulation, and optimization. His recent research activities also include VLSI implementation of communication systems, three-dimensional VLSI circuits, and radiation-hardened by design technologies. He is currently serving as an Associate Editor for IEEE Transactions on Computer-Aided Design of Integrated Circuits and Systems and IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems-II: Express Briefs.

 

Stan BirchfieldStan Birchfield is an affiliate faculty member in the Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering at the University of Washington and principal research scientist and senior research manager at NVIDIA Corporation, exploring the intersection of computer vision and robotics. Birchfield has authored or co-authored more than a hundred publications in the areas of computer vision, stereo correspondence, visual tracking, spatial acoustics, mobile robotics, and robotic manipulation. He also wrote a textbook in image processing and analysis, and his open-source software has been used by researchers around the world.

 

Jenq-Neng Hwang is a professor and International Program Lead in the Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering at the University of Washington. He is the director of the Information Processing Lab, which has won several AI City Challenges awards. Hwang has written more than 400 journal, conference papers, and book chapters in the areas of machine learning, multimedia signal processing, computer vision, and multimedia system integration. He has also authored the textbook “Multimedia Networking: from Theory to Practice,” published by Cambridge University Press.

 

Radha Poovendran is a professor in the Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering at the University of Washington. He is the founding director of the Network Security Lab and is a founding member and associate director of research for the UW’s Center for Excellence in Information Assurance Research and Education. Poovendran’s research focuses on wireless and sensor network security, adversarial modeling, privacy and anonymity in public wireless networks and cyber-physical systems security. His former students are employed in startup companies, Amazon, Google, Microsoft, Airbnb, and many universities as faculty.

 

Karthik MohanKarthik Mohan is an affiliate faculty member in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Washington, Seattle. He has extensive experience in machine learning from his Phd days to later on as Sr. Applied Scientist at Amazon and Facebook. He has worked on a range of problems including recommender systems, anomaly detection, learning graphical models, optimization methods for machine learning and natural language generation for intelligent devices, which have led to multiple publications at top conferences. 

 

Baosen Zhang is an associate professor in the Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering at the University of Washington. He received his B.A.Sc. degree in engineering science from the University of Toronto and his Ph.D. from the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of California at Berkeley. His research interest is in the area of energy systems and cyberphysical systems. Zhang has received several best paper awards from IEEE and ACM conferences. He frequently consults for companies in the areas of power systems, battery storage management and electric vehicle operations.


Questions? email pmp@ece.uw.edu