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  COVID-19 Information and Resources for ECE Students, Faculty, and Staff

UW ECE launches Certificate in Machine Learning and Deep Learning: Application Frontiers

The new three-course, graduate-level evening program is for students wanting to enhance their skills and knowledge in these exciting, cutting-edge areas.

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UW ECE launches Certificate in Machine Learning and Deep Learning: Application Frontiers Banner

ARUW takes first place in North American RoboMaster University League competition

This summer, Advanced Robotics at the University of Washington (ARUW), a team of University of Washington students advised by UW ECE professor Blake Hannaford, took first place in the inaugural North American RoboMaster University League Competition.

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ARUW takes first place in North American RoboMaster University League competition Banner

Mari Ostendorf named UW Vice Provost for Research

University of Washington Provost Mark Richards announced on Thursday the appointment of Mari Ostendorf as Vice Provost for Research, set to begin Sept. 1. Ostendorf has been serving as Associate Vice Provost for Research in the Office of Research since 2017 and will assume leadership of the UW’s premier and growing research enterprise from Mary Lidstrom.

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Mari Ostendorf named UW Vice Provost for Research Banner

UW ECE welcomes two new faculty members in quantum information science and technology

Sara Mouradian (left) and Rahul Trivedi (right) will be joining UW ECE as assistant professors in March 2022 and January 2023, respectively.

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UW ECE welcomes two new faculty members in quantum information science and technology Banner

UW ECE-affiliated companies contribute to making UW #4 in the country for economic impact as a result of federal research investments

WiBotic and Jeeva Wireless are featured in a new report from The Science Coalition, which describes economic impact of spinoff companies created from federally funded university research.

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UW ECE-affiliated companies contribute to making UW #4 in the country for economic impact as a result of federal research investments Banner

UW ECE faculty, students and staff receive UW College of Engineering awards

UW ECE faculty members Sam Burden, Lillian Ratliff and Linda Shapiro, as well as UW ECE students Shuowei Li and Momona Yamagami all received 2021 UW College of Engineering awards for their demonstrated commitment to innovation, leadership and service.

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UW ECE faculty, students and staff receive UW College of Engineering awards Banner

News + Events

https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/certificate-machine-learning-and-deep-learning/
https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/aruw-wins-2021-robomaster/
https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/mari-ostendorf-named-uw-vice-provost-for-research/
Mari Ostendorf named UW Vice Provost for Research

Mari Ostendorf named UW Vice Provost for Research

University of Washington Provost Mark Richards announced on Thursday the appointment of Mari Ostendorf as Vice Provost for Research, set to begin Sept. 1. Ostendorf has been serving as Associate Vice Provost for Research in the Office of Research since 2017 and will assume leadership of the UW’s premier and growing research enterprise from Mary Lidstrom.

https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/new-qist-faculty/
https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/uw-ece-economic-impact/
https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/congrats-class-of-2021/
Congratulations, Class of 2021!

Congratulations, Class of 2021!

UW ECE Graduation was held Wednesday, June 9. In case you missed it, a recording of the virtual celebration is available on our website.

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Join the Machine Learning Revolution!

[caption id="attachment_22498" align="aligncenter" width="915"]Machine and Deep Learning 3 Photo illustration: Ryan Hoover / UW ECE[/caption] Email spam filters and autocorrect. Siri, Alexa and Cortana. Self-driving cars. Things that once seemed like science fiction are now part of our daily lives, thanks to machine learning. Every day, machine learning is making our systems and devices smarter — and changing the way we live in profound ways. UW ECE will launch the new Certificate in Machine Learning and Deep Learning: Application Frontiers this upcoming autumn quarter —  an evening, graduate-level program for students wanting to enhance their skills and knowledge in these areas. The three-course certificate program explores how machine learning is reshaping the world, and what tools are needed to help make that happen.  The program is designed for those with a programming background who are interested in pursuing a master’s degree in electrical and computer engineering, those with engineering or computer science degrees who are looking to add to their skill sets, and professionals from other backgrounds seeking to enter the machine learning field. Students will learn how to implement and evaluate learning algorithms for a broad range of applications and work with state-of-the-art Python libraries for machine learning such as NumPy and PyTorch. Students will choose the path of study that most interests them by selecting classes offered through the Department’s Professional Master’s Program. Learn more about the program, curriculum and instructors by attending an upcoming online information session on Wednesday, July 28, 2021 at 12 p.m. PDT. RSVP Questions? email pmp@ece.uw.edu [post_title] => UW ECE launches Certificate in Machine Learning and Deep Learning: Application Frontiers [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => certificate-machine-learning-and-deep-learning [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-07-23 11:33:37 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-07-23 18:33:37 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=22499 [menu_order] => 2 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 22481 [post_author] => 27 [post_date] => 2021-07-21 17:36:05 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-07-22 00:36:05 [post_content] => Adapted from an ARUW announcement [caption id="attachment_22483" align="alignright" width="625"]Photo of the ARUM team celebrating their win at the competition Advanced Robotics at the University of Washington (ARUW) celebrates their win at the North American RoboMaster University League Competition, which was held June 19–21 at Texas A&M University. Team members who traveled to the competition in-person were (from left to right) Emelia Hughes, Derek Wang, Kaelin Laundry, Matthew Arnold (kneeling), Winston Chen, Sig Johnson, Cole Welch (kneeling), Austin Jenchi, Noah Miller and Kevin Egedy. Photo by DJI staff[/caption] This summer, Advanced Robotics at the University of Washington (ARUW), a team of University of Washington students advised by UW ECE professor Blake Hannaford, took first place in the inaugural North American RoboMaster University League Competition. The team continued a six-year legacy of success, winning the title “North American RoboMaster Champions.” RoboMaster is an annual intercollegiate robotic competition and academic exchange founded and hosted by Da-Jiang Innovations. The program began in 2013 as a small-scale internal competition held inside DJI’s headquarters, but it has grown exponentially since then and now encompasses worldwide robotics competitions for university students, K–12 students and the general public. ARUW is a 50-person team representing students from various academic backgrounds at the University ranging from the sciences, math and engineering to humanities and the arts. In past years, the team has competed in the global RoboMaster competition in Shenzhen, China, but in light of COVID-19 travel restrictions, teams from American, Mexican and Canadian universities came together this year to hold the first dedicated North American regional competition at Texas A&M University. ARUW sent 10 people to the competition to participate in-person. [caption id="attachment_22485" align="alignleft" width="450"]Headshots of Blake Hannaford, Winston Chen and Kevin Egedy ARUW is advised by UW ECE professor Blake Hannaford (left). This year’s winning team included UW ECE undergraduate students Winston Chen (center) and Kevin Egedy (right). Photos of Chen and Egedy by Emelia Hughes[/caption] The traveling team was led by UW Mechanical Engineering graduate Sig Johnson and included UW ECE undergraduate students Winston Chen and Kevin Egedy. UW ME undergraduates Noah Miller and Derek Wang piloted ARUW’s robots in the competition, and the team earned a spot against Virginia Tech in the finals, which were held on June 21. ARUW took home the prize after winning a five-game series. “Competing with ARUW is unlike anything else. It is a thrilling experience to put all your hard work on the line,” Egedy said. “I’m looking forward to another year and bringing home next year’s trophy.” “I became part of ARUW in my freshman year. It’s a very vibrant community where you can not only develop technical skills but also make friends,” Chen said. “The experience of the North America Regional Competition was phenomenal, and I’m extremely proud of my team for winning this championship.”

How the competition works

[caption id="attachment_22488" align="alignright" width="450"]Two photos of the Hero Robot, showing its size and the golf balls it carries Each university team designed and built three robots to battle it out in the competition. Shown here from two different angles is the “Hero” robot, which is capable of launching 42mm, golf-ball sized, projectiles at its opponents.[/caption] Each year, ARUW designs and builds a team of seven robots for the competition. Every robot serves a unique purpose at the annual event, which is formatted in a manner similar to a video game or “capture the flag.” Teams of robots battle for supremacy, launching projectiles at each other. Each robot has pressure-sensitive plates built into it that can detect when it’s been hit and lower the device’s “health score” in the match accordingly. For this competition, only three of the robots were fielded because of time and work constraints the North American teams faced. The primary robot for every team is called the “Standard,” and this robot is able to launch 17mm projectiles in order to hit robots on an opposing team. A strong Standard robot is critical to game play. Every team also constructed a second, attacking robot called the “Hero,” which is able to launch 42mm, or golf-ball sized, projectiles. Each of these projectiles is able to deal a large amount of damage to enemy robots in comparison to projectiles launched by the Standard; however, building an effective Hero robot is considered a difficult engineering problem for team members to solve. The third robot fielded at the competition is known as the “Sentry.” This robot is completely autonomous, meaning that it does not have a human pilot during the matches. The Sentry presents the toughest engineering challenge for the teams, as it must be able to move on a rail, detect enemy robots and accurately aim projectiles at the same time, without any assistance. The main purpose of the Sentry is to guard the team’s base, a large outpost on either side of the field with pressure-sensitive plates. The opposing team is unable to damage the base until they have disabled the Sentry robot. The human pilots of the Standard and Hero robots view the field on a screen, much as one would in a video game, but through a first-person perspective camera mounted to the top of each robot. During the match, the pilots are unable to see the field apart from their viewpoints on the robots. Working together, the two pilots have to strategize the best way to disable adversarial robots and conquer the opposing team’s base in order to win. “ARUW is ecstatic about this victory. It came at the end of a hard season overcoming the pandemic, remote work and all the other unique challenges presented in the past year,” said ARUW Vice President Emelia Hughes. “We’re very proud of all our members for the hard work they put in, and we look forward to seeing what great things the team and its members will achieve in the coming years.” Learn more about Advanced Robotics at the University of Washington (ARUW) on their website.   [post_title] => ARUW takes first place in North American RoboMaster University League competition [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => aruw-wins-2021-robomaster [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-07-21 17:36:05 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-07-22 00:36:05 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=22481 [menu_order] => 3 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 22413 [post_author] => 26 [post_date] => 2021-07-09 05:34:39 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-07-09 12:34:39 [post_content] => Story by Jackson Holtz | UW News University of Washington Provost Mark Richards announced on Thursday the appointment of ECE Professor Mari Ostendorf as Vice Provost for Research, set to begin Sept. 1. Ostendorf has been serving as Associate Vice Provost for Research in the Office of Research since 2017. Ostendorf will assume leadership of the UW’s premier and growing research enterprise from Mary Lidstrom, who has served for 15 years as Vice Provost for Research. Lidstrom will step down from the role Aug. 31 and return to the faculty to focus on her research in chemical engineering and microbiology.

[caption id="attachment_22420" align="alignright" width="261"]Mari Ostendorf Mari Ostendorf / University of Washington[/caption] Over the past 16 years, the University’s research portfolio has grown from $996 million to an astounding $1.63 billion in 2020. Since 2010, the UW has received more externally sponsored research funding than any other U.S. public university. Recent global rankings that emphasize research place the UW in the range of sixth to 16th in the world. “Because the Office of Research partners with leaders and units across the university, Dr. Ostendorf’s demonstrated vision and collaborative leadership will be critical to advancing our interdisciplinary research efforts, as well as our ongoing diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives,” Richards said. Collaborative research has grown, with 27% of UW research funding involving partnerships with other entities. The Office of Research has evolved and grown as well, with additional units and programs and a host of initiatives focused on serving the research community. “I look forward to supporting the Provost’s diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives, recognizing that diverse perspectives foster innovation, and to helping build partnerships that strengthen the UW ecosystem for interdisciplinary research,” Ostendorf said. In addition to holding an endowed professorship of system design methodologies in the College of Engineering’s electrical and computer engineering department, Ostendorf is an adjunct professor of computer science and engineering, and of linguistics. She also has served as associate dean for research and graduate studies in the College of Engineering and as associate chair for research in electrical engineering. A prominent researcher in the areas of speech and language technology, Ostendorf’s current research focuses on conversational artificial intelligence, exploring dynamic and context-aware models for understanding and generating speech and text, particularly in multi-party contexts. This work contributes to a variety of applications, from education to clinical and scientific information extraction, and has been used in automatic analysis of human-to-human call center conversations, automatic extraction of information from clinical notes, and natural language processing to support development of more accurate STEM assessments. Ostendorf earned her doctoral, master’s and bachelor’s degrees in electrical engineering from Stanford University, joining the UW in 1999 after several years as an electrical and computer engineering faculty member at Boston University. Elected to the National Academy of Engineering earlier this year, she is also a fellow of the IEEE, the International Speech and Communication Association and the Association for Computational Linguistics, and is a member of the Washington State Academy of Sciences, a corresponding fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, and a former Australian-American Fulbright Scholar. [post_title] => Mari Ostendorf named UW Vice Provost for Research [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => mari-ostendorf-named-uw-vice-provost-for-research [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-07-09 05:35:51 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-07-09 12:35:51 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=22413 [menu_order] => 4 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 22386 [post_author] => 27 [post_date] => 2021-07-06 13:32:36 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-07-06 20:32:36 [post_content] => By Wayne Gillam | UW ECE News [caption id="attachment_22388" align="alignright" width="600"]Sara Mouradian and Rahul Trivedi headshots UW ECE is proud to welcome Sara Mouradian (left) and Rahul Trivedi (right) as new assistant professors in March 2022 and January 2023, respectively. Mouradian and Trivedi each specialize in quantum information science and technology, or QIST.[/caption] Quantum computing systems hold the potential to spur significant breakthroughs in science, medicine and engineering by approaching complex problems in new ways. These breakthroughs could impact many aspects of our lives, leading to improvements in data and online security, healthcare, energy production and finance. The University of Washington Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering is committed to pioneering the development of quantum-enabled technologies through participation in the UW’s interdisciplinary QuantumX Initiative and through several associated research projects led by UW ECE faculty. Now, the Department is proud to welcome two new faculty members who specialize in quantum information science and technology, or QIST. Sara Mouradian and Rahul Trivedi will join UW ECE as assistant professors in March 2022 and January 2023, respectively. Their new positions are supported by a UW College of Engineering cluster hiring initiative in QIST, which also includes new faculty hires in the UW Department of Mechanical Engineering, UW Department of Materials Science & Engineering and the Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering. “Our vision is for the UW to have expertise across the full quantum stack,” said UW ECE and UW Department of Physics Associate Professor Kai-Mei Fu, who is co-chair of the Quantum X Initiative. “Our future colleagues in ECE, ME, MSE and CSE will help the UW address the key QIST engineering challenges of performance and scalability. We want to help develop a Quantum Silicon Valley in the Pacific Northwest, and we want the UW to be the number one place in the world for students to come and build their skills in QIST.” Mouradian and Trivedi are both highly accomplished scholars and educators, and according to UW ECE Professor and Chair Eric Klavins, they will significantly enhance the Department and add great value to the University community. “We are thrilled to have Sara and Rahul join UW ECE,” Klavins said. “Sara brings new technology and experimental methods, while Rahul brings theoretical and algorithmic foundations. Both will help connect physics to engineering, enabling QIST to fulfill its potential as a game-changing technology.” Sara Mouradian headshot

Sara Mouradian

Sara Mouradian is an Intelligence Community Postdoctoral Fellow at UC Berkeley, where she is working to demonstrate a multi-register optical control system for trapped-ion quantum sensing. She received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees and Ph.D. in electrical engineering and computer science from MIT in 2010, 2012, and 2018, respectively. She began her research in quantum computing as an undergraduate while completing a senior research project. Mouradian’s research interests include engineering control infrastructure for large trapped-ion quantum systems without degrading the quantum memory storage time. Her academic interests range from nanophotonics to atomic physics. “I’m excited to join the growing community of quantum researchers at ECE, UW and the Seattle area at large,” Mouradian said. “I’m also looking forward to teaching and working with the undergraduate and graduate students and to exploring the mountains of the Pacific Northwest.”  

Rahul Trivedi headshot

Rahul Trivedi

Rahul Trivedi is a postdoctoral scholar at the Max Planck-Harvard Research Center for Quantum Optics, working with Professor J. Ignacio Cirac. He obtained his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Stanford University in 2020 and Bachelor of Technology in electrical engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology Delhi in 2016. Trivedi’s current research focuses on understanding the limitations of near-term quantum computers and simulators, as well as using them to aid simulation and design of next-generation quantum devices. He has previously worked on computational electromagnetics, nanophotonics simulation and design, and theoretical quantum optics. Trivedi said, “I am looking forward to joining UW ECE, being a part of its diverse and multidisciplinary community and working toward solving both scientific and technological problems in quantum information sciences and beyond.”     UW ECE would like to thank the faculty search committee, which was chaired by UW ECE Professor Georg Seelig. The Department appreciates the committee members’ careful reviews, engaged participation and generous welcome toward the candidates. [post_title] => UW ECE welcomes two new faculty members in quantum information science and technology [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => new-qist-faculty [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-07-06 13:32:36 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-07-06 20:32:36 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=22386 [menu_order] => 5 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 22256 [post_author] => 27 [post_date] => 2021-06-22 09:22:38 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-06-22 16:22:38 [post_content] => Adapted from UW News [caption id="attachment_22281" align="alignright" width="600"]UW Gerberding Hall behind cherry tree blossoms According to a new report from The Science Coalition, the University of Washington is the No. 4 higher education institution in the country in terms of total economic impact as a result of federal research expenditures. UW ECE-affiliated companies WiBotic and Jeeva Wireless were featured in the report.[/caption] According to a new report from The Science Coalition, a group of more than 50 of the nation’s leading public and private universities, the University of Washington is the No. 4 higher education institution in the country in terms of total economic impact as a result of federal research expenditures. UW ECE-affiliated companies WiBotic and Jeeva Wireless, which grew out of federally funded university research and got their start in the lab of UW ECE professor Joshua Smith, were featured in the report as contributing to this high national ranking. The report details the economic impact of spinoff companies created from federally funded university research and highlights 53 spinoff companies from coalition member institutions. The report states that the UW alone contributed $306.8 million to the U.S. gross domestic product and helped to produce more than 3,908 jobs. It also notes that Wibotic and Jeeva Wireless ultimately contributed $30.9 million to the U.S. GDP and 28 jobs. Overall, the report found that federally funded university research supported nearly 100,000 jobs and contributed more than $1.3 billion to the U.S. GDP across all 50 states between 2015 and 2019.  

WiBotic and Jeeva Wireless

[caption id="attachment_22273" align="alignleft" width="500"]At left, a mobile robot approaches a WiBotic wireless charger. At right, a photo of the tiny Jeeva Parsair chip on the tip of a finger At left, a mobile robot approaches a WiBotic wireless charging station on a construction site. Right, the Jeeva Wireless Parsair chip.[/caption] WiBotic provides wireless power optimization solutions that are integral to charging the rapidly growing ecosystem of aerial, mobile, marine and industrial robots. The company is currently working with NASA to develop a line of lightweight, ultrafast wireless chargers that could help both humans and robots live and work on the moon. The Jeeva Wireless Parsair chip provides ultra-low power communication technology and creates passive backscatter technology that uses 1,000 times less power, costs significantly less, and takes up less space than conventional radios, allowing devices to communicate over standard wireless protocols. In addition to funding the fundamental research, the first investment into Jeeva Wireless was from the National Science Foundation’s Small Business Innovation Research program.     [caption id="attachment_22258" align="alignright" width="400"]Joshua Smith headshot Joshua Smith is the Milton and Delia Zeutschel Professor in Entrepreneurial Excellence at UW ECE and in the Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering. He is also co-founder of UW spinoffs WiBotic and Jeeva Wireless. Smith noted in The Science Coalition report the important role federal research funding played in development of both of these UW ECE-affiliated companies. Photo by Tara Gimmer[/caption]

The importance of federal funding for research

Smith, who is the Milton and Delia Zeutschel Professor in Entrepreneurial Excellence at UW ECE and the Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering, is also co-founder of WiBotic and Jeeva Wireless. He was quoted in the report as saying that the federal funding received in 2011 was “essential to launching Jeeva.” According to Smith, “Several years of fundamental research, which led to numerous awards and patents, created the fundamental technology,” which includes a battery-free power source. “Then further grants and contracts from the government have allowed the company to take the technology further, turning it into a real business, creating new jobs,” he said. The report ranks coalition member institutions based on economic impact as a result of federal expenditures. It’s on this list that the UW ranks fourth behind Johns Hopkins University, University of Michigan and University of California, San Francisco. To learn more, view this UW press release and The Science Coalition’s fourth Sparking Economic Growth report, released in April 2021. [post_title] => UW ECE-affiliated companies contribute to making UW #4 in the country for economic impact as a result of federal research investments [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => uw-ece-economic-impact [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-06-22 10:14:52 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-06-22 17:14:52 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=22256 [menu_order] => 6 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 22207 [post_author] => 27 [post_date] => 2021-06-11 10:05:17 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-06-11 17:05:17 [post_content] =>

UW ECE Virtual Graduation Celebration, Wednesday, June 9

Thank you to everyone who was able to join us for our UW ECE Graduation Celebration via Remo, Zoom and YouTube Live! In case you missed the event, you can view the video below or visit our Graduation page to watch speeches from UW ECE Professor and Chair Eric Klavins, UW ECE Graduation Guest Speaker Henrique (Rico) Malvar, and warm wishes from our UW ECE faculty and staff! To our graduating students, we wish you the best of luck in all of your future endeavors! View and download the Graduation event program! [post_title] => Congratulations, Class of 2021! [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => congrats-class-of-2021 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-06-14 11:38:59 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-06-14 18:38:59 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=22207 [menu_order] => 7 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [_numposts:protected] => 6 [_rendered:protected] => 1 [_classes:protected] => Array ( [0] => view-block [1] => block--spotlight-robust-news ) [_finalHTML:protected] =>
https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/certificate-machine-learning-and-deep-learning/
https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/aruw-wins-2021-robomaster/
https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/mari-ostendorf-named-uw-vice-provost-for-research/
Mari Ostendorf named UW Vice Provost for Research

Mari Ostendorf named UW Vice Provost for Research

University of Washington Provost Mark Richards announced on Thursday the appointment of Mari Ostendorf as Vice Provost for Research, set to begin Sept. 1. Ostendorf has been serving as Associate Vice Provost for Research in the Office of Research since 2017 and will assume leadership of the UW’s premier and growing research enterprise from Mary Lidstrom.

https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/new-qist-faculty/
https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/uw-ece-economic-impact/
https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/congrats-class-of-2021/
Congratulations, Class of 2021!

Congratulations, Class of 2021!

UW ECE Graduation was held Wednesday, June 9. In case you missed it, a recording of the virtual celebration is available on our website.

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Join the Machine Learning Revolution!

[caption id="attachment_22498" align="aligncenter" width="915"]Machine and Deep Learning 3 Photo illustration: Ryan Hoover / UW ECE[/caption] Email spam filters and autocorrect. Siri, Alexa and Cortana. Self-driving cars. Things that once seemed like science fiction are now part of our daily lives, thanks to machine learning. Every day, machine learning is making our systems and devices smarter — and changing the way we live in profound ways. UW ECE will launch the new Certificate in Machine Learning and Deep Learning: Application Frontiers this upcoming autumn quarter —  an evening, graduate-level program for students wanting to enhance their skills and knowledge in these areas. The three-course certificate program explores how machine learning is reshaping the world, and what tools are needed to help make that happen.  The program is designed for those with a programming background who are interested in pursuing a master’s degree in electrical and computer engineering, those with engineering or computer science degrees who are looking to add to their skill sets, and professionals from other backgrounds seeking to enter the machine learning field. Students will learn how to implement and evaluate learning algorithms for a broad range of applications and work with state-of-the-art Python libraries for machine learning such as NumPy and PyTorch. Students will choose the path of study that most interests them by selecting classes offered through the Department’s Professional Master’s Program. Learn more about the program, curriculum and instructors by attending an upcoming online information session on Wednesday, July 28, 2021 at 12 p.m. PDT. RSVP Questions? email pmp@ece.uw.edu [post_title] => UW ECE launches Certificate in Machine Learning and Deep Learning: Application Frontiers [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => certificate-machine-learning-and-deep-learning [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-07-23 11:33:37 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-07-23 18:33:37 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=22499 [menu_order] => 2 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 22481 [post_author] => 27 [post_date] => 2021-07-21 17:36:05 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-07-22 00:36:05 [post_content] => Adapted from an ARUW announcement [caption id="attachment_22483" align="alignright" width="625"]Photo of the ARUM team celebrating their win at the competition Advanced Robotics at the University of Washington (ARUW) celebrates their win at the North American RoboMaster University League Competition, which was held June 19–21 at Texas A&M University. Team members who traveled to the competition in-person were (from left to right) Emelia Hughes, Derek Wang, Kaelin Laundry, Matthew Arnold (kneeling), Winston Chen, Sig Johnson, Cole Welch (kneeling), Austin Jenchi, Noah Miller and Kevin Egedy. Photo by DJI staff[/caption] This summer, Advanced Robotics at the University of Washington (ARUW), a team of University of Washington students advised by UW ECE professor Blake Hannaford, took first place in the inaugural North American RoboMaster University League Competition. The team continued a six-year legacy of success, winning the title “North American RoboMaster Champions.” RoboMaster is an annual intercollegiate robotic competition and academic exchange founded and hosted by Da-Jiang Innovations. The program began in 2013 as a small-scale internal competition held inside DJI’s headquarters, but it has grown exponentially since then and now encompasses worldwide robotics competitions for university students, K–12 students and the general public. ARUW is a 50-person team representing students from various academic backgrounds at the University ranging from the sciences, math and engineering to humanities and the arts. In past years, the team has competed in the global RoboMaster competition in Shenzhen, China, but in light of COVID-19 travel restrictions, teams from American, Mexican and Canadian universities came together this year to hold the first dedicated North American regional competition at Texas A&M University. ARUW sent 10 people to the competition to participate in-person. [caption id="attachment_22485" align="alignleft" width="450"]Headshots of Blake Hannaford, Winston Chen and Kevin Egedy ARUW is advised by UW ECE professor Blake Hannaford (left). This year’s winning team included UW ECE undergraduate students Winston Chen (center) and Kevin Egedy (right). Photos of Chen and Egedy by Emelia Hughes[/caption] The traveling team was led by UW Mechanical Engineering graduate Sig Johnson and included UW ECE undergraduate students Winston Chen and Kevin Egedy. UW ME undergraduates Noah Miller and Derek Wang piloted ARUW’s robots in the competition, and the team earned a spot against Virginia Tech in the finals, which were held on June 21. ARUW took home the prize after winning a five-game series. “Competing with ARUW is unlike anything else. It is a thrilling experience to put all your hard work on the line,” Egedy said. “I’m looking forward to another year and bringing home next year’s trophy.” “I became part of ARUW in my freshman year. It’s a very vibrant community where you can not only develop technical skills but also make friends,” Chen said. “The experience of the North America Regional Competition was phenomenal, and I’m extremely proud of my team for winning this championship.”

How the competition works

[caption id="attachment_22488" align="alignright" width="450"]Two photos of the Hero Robot, showing its size and the golf balls it carries Each university team designed and built three robots to battle it out in the competition. Shown here from two different angles is the “Hero” robot, which is capable of launching 42mm, golf-ball sized, projectiles at its opponents.[/caption] Each year, ARUW designs and builds a team of seven robots for the competition. Every robot serves a unique purpose at the annual event, which is formatted in a manner similar to a video game or “capture the flag.” Teams of robots battle for supremacy, launching projectiles at each other. Each robot has pressure-sensitive plates built into it that can detect when it’s been hit and lower the device’s “health score” in the match accordingly. For this competition, only three of the robots were fielded because of time and work constraints the North American teams faced. The primary robot for every team is called the “Standard,” and this robot is able to launch 17mm projectiles in order to hit robots on an opposing team. A strong Standard robot is critical to game play. Every team also constructed a second, attacking robot called the “Hero,” which is able to launch 42mm, or golf-ball sized, projectiles. Each of these projectiles is able to deal a large amount of damage to enemy robots in comparison to projectiles launched by the Standard; however, building an effective Hero robot is considered a difficult engineering problem for team members to solve. The third robot fielded at the competition is known as the “Sentry.” This robot is completely autonomous, meaning that it does not have a human pilot during the matches. The Sentry presents the toughest engineering challenge for the teams, as it must be able to move on a rail, detect enemy robots and accurately aim projectiles at the same time, without any assistance. The main purpose of the Sentry is to guard the team’s base, a large outpost on either side of the field with pressure-sensitive plates. The opposing team is unable to damage the base until they have disabled the Sentry robot. The human pilots of the Standard and Hero robots view the field on a screen, much as one would in a video game, but through a first-person perspective camera mounted to the top of each robot. During the match, the pilots are unable to see the field apart from their viewpoints on the robots. Working together, the two pilots have to strategize the best way to disable adversarial robots and conquer the opposing team’s base in order to win. “ARUW is ecstatic about this victory. It came at the end of a hard season overcoming the pandemic, remote work and all the other unique challenges presented in the past year,” said ARUW Vice President Emelia Hughes. “We’re very proud of all our members for the hard work they put in, and we look forward to seeing what great things the team and its members will achieve in the coming years.” Learn more about Advanced Robotics at the University of Washington (ARUW) on their website.   [post_title] => ARUW takes first place in North American RoboMaster University League competition [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => aruw-wins-2021-robomaster [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-07-21 17:36:05 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-07-22 00:36:05 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=22481 [menu_order] => 3 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 22413 [post_author] => 26 [post_date] => 2021-07-09 05:34:39 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-07-09 12:34:39 [post_content] => Story by Jackson Holtz | UW News University of Washington Provost Mark Richards announced on Thursday the appointment of ECE Professor Mari Ostendorf as Vice Provost for Research, set to begin Sept. 1. Ostendorf has been serving as Associate Vice Provost for Research in the Office of Research since 2017. Ostendorf will assume leadership of the UW’s premier and growing research enterprise from Mary Lidstrom, who has served for 15 years as Vice Provost for Research. Lidstrom will step down from the role Aug. 31 and return to the faculty to focus on her research in chemical engineering and microbiology.

[caption id="attachment_22420" align="alignright" width="261"]Mari Ostendorf Mari Ostendorf / University of Washington[/caption] Over the past 16 years, the University’s research portfolio has grown from $996 million to an astounding $1.63 billion in 2020. Since 2010, the UW has received more externally sponsored research funding than any other U.S. public university. Recent global rankings that emphasize research place the UW in the range of sixth to 16th in the world. “Because the Office of Research partners with leaders and units across the university, Dr. Ostendorf’s demonstrated vision and collaborative leadership will be critical to advancing our interdisciplinary research efforts, as well as our ongoing diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives,” Richards said. Collaborative research has grown, with 27% of UW research funding involving partnerships with other entities. The Office of Research has evolved and grown as well, with additional units and programs and a host of initiatives focused on serving the research community. “I look forward to supporting the Provost’s diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives, recognizing that diverse perspectives foster innovation, and to helping build partnerships that strengthen the UW ecosystem for interdisciplinary research,” Ostendorf said. In addition to holding an endowed professorship of system design methodologies in the College of Engineering’s electrical and computer engineering department, Ostendorf is an adjunct professor of computer science and engineering, and of linguistics. She also has served as associate dean for research and graduate studies in the College of Engineering and as associate chair for research in electrical engineering. A prominent researcher in the areas of speech and language technology, Ostendorf’s current research focuses on conversational artificial intelligence, exploring dynamic and context-aware models for understanding and generating speech and text, particularly in multi-party contexts. This work contributes to a variety of applications, from education to clinical and scientific information extraction, and has been used in automatic analysis of human-to-human call center conversations, automatic extraction of information from clinical notes, and natural language processing to support development of more accurate STEM assessments. Ostendorf earned her doctoral, master’s and bachelor’s degrees in electrical engineering from Stanford University, joining the UW in 1999 after several years as an electrical and computer engineering faculty member at Boston University. Elected to the National Academy of Engineering earlier this year, she is also a fellow of the IEEE, the International Speech and Communication Association and the Association for Computational Linguistics, and is a member of the Washington State Academy of Sciences, a corresponding fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, and a former Australian-American Fulbright Scholar. [post_title] => Mari Ostendorf named UW Vice Provost for Research [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => mari-ostendorf-named-uw-vice-provost-for-research [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-07-09 05:35:51 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-07-09 12:35:51 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=22413 [menu_order] => 4 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 22386 [post_author] => 27 [post_date] => 2021-07-06 13:32:36 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-07-06 20:32:36 [post_content] => By Wayne Gillam | UW ECE News [caption id="attachment_22388" align="alignright" width="600"]Sara Mouradian and Rahul Trivedi headshots UW ECE is proud to welcome Sara Mouradian (left) and Rahul Trivedi (right) as new assistant professors in March 2022 and January 2023, respectively. Mouradian and Trivedi each specialize in quantum information science and technology, or QIST.[/caption] Quantum computing systems hold the potential to spur significant breakthroughs in science, medicine and engineering by approaching complex problems in new ways. These breakthroughs could impact many aspects of our lives, leading to improvements in data and online security, healthcare, energy production and finance. The University of Washington Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering is committed to pioneering the development of quantum-enabled technologies through participation in the UW’s interdisciplinary QuantumX Initiative and through several associated research projects led by UW ECE faculty. Now, the Department is proud to welcome two new faculty members who specialize in quantum information science and technology, or QIST. Sara Mouradian and Rahul Trivedi will join UW ECE as assistant professors in March 2022 and January 2023, respectively. Their new positions are supported by a UW College of Engineering cluster hiring initiative in QIST, which also includes new faculty hires in the UW Department of Mechanical Engineering, UW Department of Materials Science & Engineering and the Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering. “Our vision is for the UW to have expertise across the full quantum stack,” said UW ECE and UW Department of Physics Associate Professor Kai-Mei Fu, who is co-chair of the Quantum X Initiative. “Our future colleagues in ECE, ME, MSE and CSE will help the UW address the key QIST engineering challenges of performance and scalability. We want to help develop a Quantum Silicon Valley in the Pacific Northwest, and we want the UW to be the number one place in the world for students to come and build their skills in QIST.” Mouradian and Trivedi are both highly accomplished scholars and educators, and according to UW ECE Professor and Chair Eric Klavins, they will significantly enhance the Department and add great value to the University community. “We are thrilled to have Sara and Rahul join UW ECE,” Klavins said. “Sara brings new technology and experimental methods, while Rahul brings theoretical and algorithmic foundations. Both will help connect physics to engineering, enabling QIST to fulfill its potential as a game-changing technology.” Sara Mouradian headshot

Sara Mouradian

Sara Mouradian is an Intelligence Community Postdoctoral Fellow at UC Berkeley, where she is working to demonstrate a multi-register optical control system for trapped-ion quantum sensing. She received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees and Ph.D. in electrical engineering and computer science from MIT in 2010, 2012, and 2018, respectively. She began her research in quantum computing as an undergraduate while completing a senior research project. Mouradian’s research interests include engineering control infrastructure for large trapped-ion quantum systems without degrading the quantum memory storage time. Her academic interests range from nanophotonics to atomic physics. “I’m excited to join the growing community of quantum researchers at ECE, UW and the Seattle area at large,” Mouradian said. “I’m also looking forward to teaching and working with the undergraduate and graduate students and to exploring the mountains of the Pacific Northwest.”  

Rahul Trivedi headshot

Rahul Trivedi

Rahul Trivedi is a postdoctoral scholar at the Max Planck-Harvard Research Center for Quantum Optics, working with Professor J. Ignacio Cirac. He obtained his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Stanford University in 2020 and Bachelor of Technology in electrical engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology Delhi in 2016. Trivedi’s current research focuses on understanding the limitations of near-term quantum computers and simulators, as well as using them to aid simulation and design of next-generation quantum devices. He has previously worked on computational electromagnetics, nanophotonics simulation and design, and theoretical quantum optics. Trivedi said, “I am looking forward to joining UW ECE, being a part of its diverse and multidisciplinary community and working toward solving both scientific and technological problems in quantum information sciences and beyond.”     UW ECE would like to thank the faculty search committee, which was chaired by UW ECE Professor Georg Seelig. The Department appreciates the committee members’ careful reviews, engaged participation and generous welcome toward the candidates. [post_title] => UW ECE welcomes two new faculty members in quantum information science and technology [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => new-qist-faculty [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-07-06 13:32:36 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-07-06 20:32:36 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=22386 [menu_order] => 5 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 22256 [post_author] => 27 [post_date] => 2021-06-22 09:22:38 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-06-22 16:22:38 [post_content] => Adapted from UW News [caption id="attachment_22281" align="alignright" width="600"]UW Gerberding Hall behind cherry tree blossoms According to a new report from The Science Coalition, the University of Washington is the No. 4 higher education institution in the country in terms of total economic impact as a result of federal research expenditures. UW ECE-affiliated companies WiBotic and Jeeva Wireless were featured in the report.[/caption] According to a new report from The Science Coalition, a group of more than 50 of the nation’s leading public and private universities, the University of Washington is the No. 4 higher education institution in the country in terms of total economic impact as a result of federal research expenditures. UW ECE-affiliated companies WiBotic and Jeeva Wireless, which grew out of federally funded university research and got their start in the lab of UW ECE professor Joshua Smith, were featured in the report as contributing to this high national ranking. The report details the economic impact of spinoff companies created from federally funded university research and highlights 53 spinoff companies from coalition member institutions. The report states that the UW alone contributed $306.8 million to the U.S. gross domestic product and helped to produce more than 3,908 jobs. It also notes that Wibotic and Jeeva Wireless ultimately contributed $30.9 million to the U.S. GDP and 28 jobs. Overall, the report found that federally funded university research supported nearly 100,000 jobs and contributed more than $1.3 billion to the U.S. GDP across all 50 states between 2015 and 2019.  

WiBotic and Jeeva Wireless

[caption id="attachment_22273" align="alignleft" width="500"]At left, a mobile robot approaches a WiBotic wireless charger. At right, a photo of the tiny Jeeva Parsair chip on the tip of a finger At left, a mobile robot approaches a WiBotic wireless charging station on a construction site. Right, the Jeeva Wireless Parsair chip.[/caption] WiBotic provides wireless power optimization solutions that are integral to charging the rapidly growing ecosystem of aerial, mobile, marine and industrial robots. The company is currently working with NASA to develop a line of lightweight, ultrafast wireless chargers that could help both humans and robots live and work on the moon. The Jeeva Wireless Parsair chip provides ultra-low power communication technology and creates passive backscatter technology that uses 1,000 times less power, costs significantly less, and takes up less space than conventional radios, allowing devices to communicate over standard wireless protocols. In addition to funding the fundamental research, the first investment into Jeeva Wireless was from the National Science Foundation’s Small Business Innovation Research program.     [caption id="attachment_22258" align="alignright" width="400"]Joshua Smith headshot Joshua Smith is the Milton and Delia Zeutschel Professor in Entrepreneurial Excellence at UW ECE and in the Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering. He is also co-founder of UW spinoffs WiBotic and Jeeva Wireless. Smith noted in The Science Coalition report the important role federal research funding played in development of both of these UW ECE-affiliated companies. Photo by Tara Gimmer[/caption]

The importance of federal funding for research

Smith, who is the Milton and Delia Zeutschel Professor in Entrepreneurial Excellence at UW ECE and the Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering, is also co-founder of WiBotic and Jeeva Wireless. He was quoted in the report as saying that the federal funding received in 2011 was “essential to launching Jeeva.” According to Smith, “Several years of fundamental research, which led to numerous awards and patents, created the fundamental technology,” which includes a battery-free power source. “Then further grants and contracts from the government have allowed the company to take the technology further, turning it into a real business, creating new jobs,” he said. The report ranks coalition member institutions based on economic impact as a result of federal expenditures. It’s on this list that the UW ranks fourth behind Johns Hopkins University, University of Michigan and University of California, San Francisco. To learn more, view this UW press release and The Science Coalition’s fourth Sparking Economic Growth report, released in April 2021. [post_title] => UW ECE-affiliated companies contribute to making UW #4 in the country for economic impact as a result of federal research investments [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => uw-ece-economic-impact [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-06-22 10:14:52 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-06-22 17:14:52 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=22256 [menu_order] => 6 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 22207 [post_author] => 27 [post_date] => 2021-06-11 10:05:17 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-06-11 17:05:17 [post_content] =>

UW ECE Virtual Graduation Celebration, Wednesday, June 9

Thank you to everyone who was able to join us for our UW ECE Graduation Celebration via Remo, Zoom and YouTube Live! In case you missed the event, you can view the video below or visit our Graduation page to watch speeches from UW ECE Professor and Chair Eric Klavins, UW ECE Graduation Guest Speaker Henrique (Rico) Malvar, and warm wishes from our UW ECE faculty and staff! To our graduating students, we wish you the best of luck in all of your future endeavors! View and download the Graduation event program! [post_title] => Congratulations, Class of 2021! [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => congrats-class-of-2021 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-06-14 11:38:59 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-06-14 18:38:59 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=22207 [menu_order] => 7 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 6 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 22499 [post_author] => 26 [post_date] => 2021-07-23 11:26:23 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-07-23 18:26:23 [post_content] =>

Join the Machine Learning Revolution!

[caption id="attachment_22498" align="aligncenter" width="915"]Machine and Deep Learning 3 Photo illustration: Ryan Hoover / UW ECE[/caption] Email spam filters and autocorrect. Siri, Alexa and Cortana. Self-driving cars. Things that once seemed like science fiction are now part of our daily lives, thanks to machine learning. Every day, machine learning is making our systems and devices smarter — and changing the way we live in profound ways. UW ECE will launch the new Certificate in Machine Learning and Deep Learning: Application Frontiers this upcoming autumn quarter —  an evening, graduate-level program for students wanting to enhance their skills and knowledge in these areas. The three-course certificate program explores how machine learning is reshaping the world, and what tools are needed to help make that happen.  The program is designed for those with a programming background who are interested in pursuing a master’s degree in electrical and computer engineering, those with engineering or computer science degrees who are looking to add to their skill sets, and professionals from other backgrounds seeking to enter the machine learning field. Students will learn how to implement and evaluate learning algorithms for a broad range of applications and work with state-of-the-art Python libraries for machine learning such as NumPy and PyTorch. Students will choose the path of study that most interests them by selecting classes offered through the Department’s Professional Master’s Program. Learn more about the program, curriculum and instructors by attending an upcoming online information session on Wednesday, July 28, 2021 at 12 p.m. PDT. RSVP Questions? email pmp@ece.uw.edu [post_title] => UW ECE launches Certificate in Machine Learning and Deep Learning: Application Frontiers [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => certificate-machine-learning-and-deep-learning [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-07-23 11:33:37 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-07-23 18:33:37 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=22499 [menu_order] => 2 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 764 [max_num_pages] => 128 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => 1 [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => 1 [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => c64914061c8ecf9b16abe746203f6ad7 [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => 1 [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed ) [compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ) ) )
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