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Assistant professor Brian Johnson leads newly awarded $4.9M DOE grant to improve solar technologies

Brian Johnson and his team will be using the grant to support their project "A Scalable Control Architecture for 100% PV Penetration with Grid Forming Inverters".

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Assistant professor Brian Johnson leads newly awarded $4.9M DOE grant to improve solar technologies Banner

Assistant professor Amy Orsborn awarded 2019 L'Oreal USA "Changing the Face of STEM" mentoring grant

Amy Orsborn was one of 11 Female Scientists who were awarded one of the 2019 L'Oreal USA "Changing the Face of STEM" mentoring grant!

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Assistant professor Amy Orsborn awarded 2019 L'Oreal USA

Four ECE students receive the Power & Energy Scholarship presented by IEEE

Recipients are high-achieving undergraduate students in electrical engineering programs who are committed to exploring the power and energy engineering field.

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Four ECE students receive the Power & Energy Scholarship presented by IEEE Banner

Professor Howard Chizeck's company Olis Robotics chosen to run software for lunar missions

U.S. technology company Maxar Technologies Inc announced it has selected software developed by startup Olis Robotics to run a robotic arm of a lunar lander under NASA’s broader goal of human moon missions by 2024.

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Professor Howard Chizeck's company Olis Robotics chosen to run software for lunar missions Banner

Assistant professor Baosen Zhang serves as panelist at DOE Artificial Intelligence Summit

Zhang discussed Artificial Intelligence for Energy Grid Optimization at event hosted by Dept. of Energy Rick Perry.

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Assistant professor Baosen Zhang serves as panelist at DOE Artificial Intelligence Summit Banner

ECE professor Arka Majumdar’s lab creates new metasurface design that can control optical fields in three dimensions

A team led by scientists at the University of Washington has designed and tested a 3D-printed metamaterial that can manipulate light with nanoscale precision.

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ECE professor Arka Majumdar’s lab creates new metasurface design that can control optical fields in three dimensions Banner

News + Events

https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/johnsondoe/
https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/amyloreal/
https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/four-ece-students-receive-the-power-energy-scholarship-presented-by-ieee/
https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/olis-lunar-missions/
https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/baosen-zhang-ai/
https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/arka-majumdar-new-metasurface/
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                    [post_content] => Brian Johnson portrait by UW FountainOn November 6, 2019, the U.S. Department of Energy announced it would provide $128 million in funding for 75 projects intending to advance solar technologies through the Solar Energy Technologies Office Fiscal Year 2019 (SETO FY2019) funding program.  This program will provide $50 million for 15 research projects that aim to improve the ability of grid operators to integrate increasing amounts of solar generation onto the grid in a cost-effective, secure, resilient and reliable manner. ECE assistant professor Brian Johnson will be leading the grant for the University of Washington.

University of Washington

Project Name

A Scalable Control Architecture for 100% PV Penetration with Grid Forming Inverters

Project Summary

This project will develop two kinds of grid-forming controls: fast communication-free controls for inverters for solar-plus-storage systems, and slower controls that use a distributed communication architecture for system-wide energy management. These controls will be immune to communication outages and be compatible with small solar energy systems as well as the bulk power grid.

Partners

Enphase Energy, University of Minnesota, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Electric Power Research Institute

Location

Seattle, WA

DOE Award Amount

$4.9 million

Cost Share

$2.1 million
The Solar Energy Technologies Office Fiscal Year 2019 (SETO FY2019) funding program supports projects that will improve the affordability, reliability and performance of solar technologies on the national grid. This program funds projects that advance early-stage systems integration, photovoltaic (PV), and concentrating solar-thermal power technologies and reduce the non-hardware costs associated with installing solar energy systems.

Approach

Systems integration projects will better enable grid operators to add increasing amounts of solar generation onto the grid in a cost-effective, secure, resilient, and reliable manner. The three subtopics will focus on adaptive distribution protection, grid services from behind-the-meter solar and other distributed energy resources, and advanced PV controls and cybersecurity.

Objectives

Projects in this funding program will address the technical challenges facing system operators to integrate higher penetration of solar generation. These projects will result in technologies that improve the protection distribution power system, enhance the visibility and control of PV inverters and plants, and realize the benefits of distributed PV to help supplement grid services while improving the security of those devices from cyberattacks.   Learn more about the SETO FY2019 funding program and the solar office’s other systems integration awards. [post_title] => Assistant professor Brian Johnson leads newly awarded $4.9M DOE grant to improve solar technologies [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => johnsondoe [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-11-13 13:33:55 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-13 21:33:55 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=16193 [menu_order] => 1 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 16164 [post_author] => 25 [post_date] => 2019-11-04 09:54:22 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-11-04 17:54:22 [post_content] => L’Oréal USA has recently announced 11 female scientists as the 2019 recipients of its annual "Changing the Face of STEM" (CTFS) mentoring grants, which are issued through the beauty leader's For Women in Science program. The selected projects represent a broad range of activities focused on mentoring and engaging girls and women in the fields of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM), from elementary to graduate school. The grants will help fund STEM programs in Missouri, Texas, Florida, New York, Washington, Maryland, Massachusetts and California. Now in its fourth year, the CTFS program supports former L’Oréal USA For Women in Science (FWIS) fellows in their efforts to inspire the next generation of girls and women in STEM. Members of the L’Oréal USA For Women in Science alumni network were given the opportunity to apply for $2,500 grants to help fund new or existing mentoring projects in their communities. The awards will be administered by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), official partner of the L’Oréal USA For Women in Science program. Dr. Amy Orsborn, an ECE assistant professor at UW, will be using her first CTFS grant to support her mentorship organization that promotes Women In Neural Engineering (WINE). WINE was founded in January, 2019 by Dr. Karen Moxon (UC Davis) and has an executive committee of 10 other female faculty. Their mission is to provide vital peer‐to‐peer mentorship and networking for women in neural engineering. The group’s initial efforts center on women at the faculty level, as this career stage represents a key bottleneck towards inclusive STEM leadership. The CTFS grant will help WINE provide mentorship and outreach across the training pipeline. Professor Orsborn's Work: Read more at Loreal USA, and find out more about Amy Orsborn and her research at Orsborn Lab.   [post_title] => Assistant professor Amy Orsborn awarded 2019 L'Oreal USA "Changing the Face of STEM" mentoring grant [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => amyloreal [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-11-07 15:28:57 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-07 23:28:57 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=16164 [menu_order] => 2 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 16152 [post_author] => 25 [post_date] => 2019-10-31 12:46:29 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-10-31 19:46:29 [post_content] =>

Congratulations to the following UW students who received the 2019-20 Power & Energy Scholarship (PES) presented by IEEE. Recipients are high-achieving undergraduate students in electrical engineering programs who are committed to exploring the power and energy engineering field through both coursework and career experiences. These scholarships are made possible due to the generous donations of individuals and corporations to the IEEE Power & Energy Society Scholarship Fund of the IEEE Foundation. Congratulations to our students!

Ishaan Bhimani - 2021 Neil Flodin - 2021 Michael Kenny - 2020 Nathan Shih - 2021 One hundred and thirty-five (135) PES Scholarship recipients were selected from the 326 individuals who applied for the scholarship. Recipients from over 78 schools received the scholarship, four of whom came from our very own department of Electrical and Computer Engineering! To review the full list of recipients click here. [post_title] => Four ECE students receive the Power & Energy Scholarship presented by IEEE [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => four-ece-students-receive-the-power-energy-scholarship-presented-by-ieee [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-11-04 12:07:57 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-04 20:07:57 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=16152 [menu_order] => 3 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 16130 [post_author] => 26 [post_date] => 2019-10-23 16:01:49 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-10-23 23:01:49 [post_content] => (content reposted from Alan Boyle's article in Geekwire) [caption id="attachment_16131" align="alignright" width="643"]An artist’s rendition shows the SAMPLR robotic arm working on the moon. An artist’s rendition shows the SAMPLR robotic arm working on the moon.[/caption] Seattle-based Olis Robotics says it’s been selected by U.S tech firm Maxar Technologies to provide software that will prepare operators on Earth to control a robotic arm on the moon. The software will be used in connection with a robotic-arm experiment known as SAMPLR (Sample Acquisition, Morphology Filtering and Probing of Lunar Regolith). SAMPLR is one of a dozen payloads chosen by NASA to fly on commercial lunar landers in support of the space agency’s Artemis program to send astronauts to the moon by 2024. The robotic arm is a flight spare left over from NASA’s Mars Exploration Rovers, Spirit and Opportunity. Both of those rovers landed on the Red Planet back in 2004, and the mission was brought to a close this February. SAMPLR will be attached to a lander to be named later, as part of NASA’s Commercial Lunar Payload Services program. It’ll be NASA’s first robotic  arm sent to the moon in more than 50 years. Olis Robotics’ software will help remote operators get ready to cope with the seconds-long signal latency that they’ll experience when they control the arm on the lunar surface. The software creates a 3-D visualization of the lunar environment, making it easier for the operators to control the arm’s movements. A similar control system could be used on future Mars landers and rovers.
“The moon provides an excellent proving ground for our robotic operator planning software, allowing operators on Earth to successfully complete more complex missions faster and safer than ever before,” Olis Robotics CEO Don Pickering said today in a news release.
[caption id="attachment_16132" align="alignleft" width="556"]Olis Robotics has developed a plug-and-play controller loaded with its AI-driven robotic control platform. Olis Robotics has developed a plug-and-play controller loaded with its AI-driven robotic control platform.[/caption] He said the software “delivers a new level of machine learning, allowing more efficient operation, while keeping the human in the loop should the robot encounter an unexpected event.” SAMPLR will acquire samples from the lunar surface, filter the regolith prior to data collection, and perform surface probing. "Maxar has participated in hundreds of successful robotic missions, including those on the space shuttles, the International Space Station and five Mars rovers and landers. Now, we’re combining that experience to deploy a robotic arm to the moon,” said Al Tadros, Maxar’s vice president of space infrastructure and civil space.
“We’re delighted to enhance SAMPLR with the cutting-edge robotic operator planning software provided by Olis Robotics,” Tadros said.
Financial terms of the teaming agreement were not disclosed. Olis Robotics, formerly known as BluHaptics, was founded in 2013 as a spin-out from the University of Washington’s Applied Physics Laboratory. It specializes in AI-driven robotic control software for subsea, terrestrial and space applications.   [post_title] => Professor Howard Chizeck's company Olis Robotics chosen to run software for lunar missions [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => olis-lunar-missions [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-10-23 16:04:13 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-10-23 23:04:13 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=16130 [menu_order] => 4 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 16037 [post_author] => 26 [post_date] => 2019-10-08 15:24:53 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-10-08 22:24:53 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_16041" align="alignright" width="200"] Assistant Professor Baosen Zhang[/caption] ECE assistant professor Baosen Zhang recently attended the 4th InnovationXLab Artificial Intelligence Summit at the Drake Hotel in Chicago, Illinois from Oct. 2-3. The event, hosted by U.S. Secretary of Energy and keynote speaker Rick Perry and the Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory, discussed the DOE's latest AI research and the recent establishment of its Artificial Intelligence and Technology Office (AITO) and Artificial Intelligence Program (DOE AI) to "harness and accelerate the Department’s world-class leadership in high-performance computing, facilities, and team science in applying AI across the entire National Laboratory system to increase the pace of discovery in energy, materials science, health care, transportation, and beyond." Zhang, who researches power systems and cyberphysical systems in the ECE Department at the University of Washington, served on a panel to discuss AI for Energy Grid Optimization, and was the sole representative from the fields of academia and engineering.
“The world is in the midst of the Golden Age of AI, and DOE’s world class scientific and computing capabilities will be critical to securing America’s dominance in this field,” said Secretary Perry.  “This new office housed within the Department of Energy will concentrate our existing efforts while also facilitating partnerships and access to federal data, models and high performance computing resources for America’s AI researchers. Its mission will be to elevate, accelerate and expand DOE’s transformative work to accelerate America’s progress in AI for years to come.”
[caption id="attachment_16042" align="alignleft" width="911"] Zhang speaking on AI for Energy Grid Optimization panel[/caption]                                   More information on the event and these new initiatives can be found on the InnovationXLab's blog page. [post_title] => Assistant professor Baosen Zhang serves as panelist at DOE Artificial Intelligence Summit [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => baosen-zhang-ai [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-10-08 15:28:01 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-10-08 22:28:01 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=16037 [menu_order] => 5 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 16024 [post_author] => 26 [post_date] => 2019-10-07 14:11:14 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-10-07 21:11:14 [post_content] => (re-posted from UW News) A team led by scientists at the University of Washington has designed and tested a 3D-printed metamaterial that can manipulate light with nanoscale precision. As they report in a paper published Oct. 4 in the journal Science Advances, their designed optical element focuses light to discrete points in a 3D helical pattern. The team’s design principles and experimental findings demonstrate that it is possible to model and construct metamaterial devices that can precisely manipulate optical fields with high spatial resolution in three dimensions. Though the team chose a helical pattern — a spiral helix — for their optical element to focus light, their approach could be used to design optical elements that control and focus light in other patterns. Devices with this level of precision control over light could be used not only to miniaturize today’s optical elements, such as lenses or retroreflectors, but also to realize new varieties. In addition, designing optical fields in three dimensions could enable creation of ultra-compact depth sensors for autonomous transportation, as well as optical elements for displays and sensors in virtual- or augmented-reality headsets. Read the full article here. [post_title] => ECE professor Arka Majumdar’s lab creates new metasurface design that can control optical fields in three dimensions [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => arka-majumdar-new-metasurface [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-11-06 11:56:36 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-06 19:56:36 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=16024 [menu_order] => 6 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [_numposts:protected] => 6 [_rendered:protected] => 1 [_classes:protected] => Array ( [0] => view-block [1] => block--spotlight-robust-news ) [_finalHTML:protected] =>
https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/johnsondoe/
https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/amyloreal/
https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/four-ece-students-receive-the-power-energy-scholarship-presented-by-ieee/
https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/olis-lunar-missions/
https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/baosen-zhang-ai/
https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/arka-majumdar-new-metasurface/
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University of Washington

Project Name

A Scalable Control Architecture for 100% PV Penetration with Grid Forming Inverters

Project Summary

This project will develop two kinds of grid-forming controls: fast communication-free controls for inverters for solar-plus-storage systems, and slower controls that use a distributed communication architecture for system-wide energy management. These controls will be immune to communication outages and be compatible with small solar energy systems as well as the bulk power grid.

Partners

Enphase Energy, University of Minnesota, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Electric Power Research Institute

Location

Seattle, WA

DOE Award Amount

$4.9 million

Cost Share

$2.1 million
The Solar Energy Technologies Office Fiscal Year 2019 (SETO FY2019) funding program supports projects that will improve the affordability, reliability and performance of solar technologies on the national grid. This program funds projects that advance early-stage systems integration, photovoltaic (PV), and concentrating solar-thermal power technologies and reduce the non-hardware costs associated with installing solar energy systems.

Approach

Systems integration projects will better enable grid operators to add increasing amounts of solar generation onto the grid in a cost-effective, secure, resilient, and reliable manner. The three subtopics will focus on adaptive distribution protection, grid services from behind-the-meter solar and other distributed energy resources, and advanced PV controls and cybersecurity.

Objectives

Projects in this funding program will address the technical challenges facing system operators to integrate higher penetration of solar generation. These projects will result in technologies that improve the protection distribution power system, enhance the visibility and control of PV inverters and plants, and realize the benefits of distributed PV to help supplement grid services while improving the security of those devices from cyberattacks.   Learn more about the SETO FY2019 funding program and the solar office’s other systems integration awards. [post_title] => Assistant professor Brian Johnson leads newly awarded $4.9M DOE grant to improve solar technologies [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => johnsondoe [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-11-13 13:33:55 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-13 21:33:55 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=16193 [menu_order] => 1 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 16164 [post_author] => 25 [post_date] => 2019-11-04 09:54:22 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-11-04 17:54:22 [post_content] => L’Oréal USA has recently announced 11 female scientists as the 2019 recipients of its annual "Changing the Face of STEM" (CTFS) mentoring grants, which are issued through the beauty leader's For Women in Science program. The selected projects represent a broad range of activities focused on mentoring and engaging girls and women in the fields of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM), from elementary to graduate school. The grants will help fund STEM programs in Missouri, Texas, Florida, New York, Washington, Maryland, Massachusetts and California. Now in its fourth year, the CTFS program supports former L’Oréal USA For Women in Science (FWIS) fellows in their efforts to inspire the next generation of girls and women in STEM. Members of the L’Oréal USA For Women in Science alumni network were given the opportunity to apply for $2,500 grants to help fund new or existing mentoring projects in their communities. The awards will be administered by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), official partner of the L’Oréal USA For Women in Science program. Dr. Amy Orsborn, an ECE assistant professor at UW, will be using her first CTFS grant to support her mentorship organization that promotes Women In Neural Engineering (WINE). WINE was founded in January, 2019 by Dr. Karen Moxon (UC Davis) and has an executive committee of 10 other female faculty. Their mission is to provide vital peer‐to‐peer mentorship and networking for women in neural engineering. The group’s initial efforts center on women at the faculty level, as this career stage represents a key bottleneck towards inclusive STEM leadership. The CTFS grant will help WINE provide mentorship and outreach across the training pipeline. Professor Orsborn's Work: Read more at Loreal USA, and find out more about Amy Orsborn and her research at Orsborn Lab.   [post_title] => Assistant professor Amy Orsborn awarded 2019 L'Oreal USA "Changing the Face of STEM" mentoring grant [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => amyloreal [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-11-07 15:28:57 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-07 23:28:57 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=16164 [menu_order] => 2 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 16152 [post_author] => 25 [post_date] => 2019-10-31 12:46:29 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-10-31 19:46:29 [post_content] =>

Congratulations to the following UW students who received the 2019-20 Power & Energy Scholarship (PES) presented by IEEE. Recipients are high-achieving undergraduate students in electrical engineering programs who are committed to exploring the power and energy engineering field through both coursework and career experiences. These scholarships are made possible due to the generous donations of individuals and corporations to the IEEE Power & Energy Society Scholarship Fund of the IEEE Foundation. Congratulations to our students!

Ishaan Bhimani - 2021 Neil Flodin - 2021 Michael Kenny - 2020 Nathan Shih - 2021 One hundred and thirty-five (135) PES Scholarship recipients were selected from the 326 individuals who applied for the scholarship. Recipients from over 78 schools received the scholarship, four of whom came from our very own department of Electrical and Computer Engineering! To review the full list of recipients click here. [post_title] => Four ECE students receive the Power & Energy Scholarship presented by IEEE [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => four-ece-students-receive-the-power-energy-scholarship-presented-by-ieee [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-11-04 12:07:57 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-04 20:07:57 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=16152 [menu_order] => 3 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 16130 [post_author] => 26 [post_date] => 2019-10-23 16:01:49 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-10-23 23:01:49 [post_content] => (content reposted from Alan Boyle's article in Geekwire) [caption id="attachment_16131" align="alignright" width="643"]An artist’s rendition shows the SAMPLR robotic arm working on the moon. An artist’s rendition shows the SAMPLR robotic arm working on the moon.[/caption] Seattle-based Olis Robotics says it’s been selected by U.S tech firm Maxar Technologies to provide software that will prepare operators on Earth to control a robotic arm on the moon. The software will be used in connection with a robotic-arm experiment known as SAMPLR (Sample Acquisition, Morphology Filtering and Probing of Lunar Regolith). SAMPLR is one of a dozen payloads chosen by NASA to fly on commercial lunar landers in support of the space agency’s Artemis program to send astronauts to the moon by 2024. The robotic arm is a flight spare left over from NASA’s Mars Exploration Rovers, Spirit and Opportunity. Both of those rovers landed on the Red Planet back in 2004, and the mission was brought to a close this February. SAMPLR will be attached to a lander to be named later, as part of NASA’s Commercial Lunar Payload Services program. It’ll be NASA’s first robotic  arm sent to the moon in more than 50 years. Olis Robotics’ software will help remote operators get ready to cope with the seconds-long signal latency that they’ll experience when they control the arm on the lunar surface. The software creates a 3-D visualization of the lunar environment, making it easier for the operators to control the arm’s movements. A similar control system could be used on future Mars landers and rovers.
“The moon provides an excellent proving ground for our robotic operator planning software, allowing operators on Earth to successfully complete more complex missions faster and safer than ever before,” Olis Robotics CEO Don Pickering said today in a news release.
[caption id="attachment_16132" align="alignleft" width="556"]Olis Robotics has developed a plug-and-play controller loaded with its AI-driven robotic control platform. Olis Robotics has developed a plug-and-play controller loaded with its AI-driven robotic control platform.[/caption] He said the software “delivers a new level of machine learning, allowing more efficient operation, while keeping the human in the loop should the robot encounter an unexpected event.” SAMPLR will acquire samples from the lunar surface, filter the regolith prior to data collection, and perform surface probing. "Maxar has participated in hundreds of successful robotic missions, including those on the space shuttles, the International Space Station and five Mars rovers and landers. Now, we’re combining that experience to deploy a robotic arm to the moon,” said Al Tadros, Maxar’s vice president of space infrastructure and civil space.
“We’re delighted to enhance SAMPLR with the cutting-edge robotic operator planning software provided by Olis Robotics,” Tadros said.
Financial terms of the teaming agreement were not disclosed. Olis Robotics, formerly known as BluHaptics, was founded in 2013 as a spin-out from the University of Washington’s Applied Physics Laboratory. It specializes in AI-driven robotic control software for subsea, terrestrial and space applications.   [post_title] => Professor Howard Chizeck's company Olis Robotics chosen to run software for lunar missions [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => olis-lunar-missions [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-10-23 16:04:13 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-10-23 23:04:13 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=16130 [menu_order] => 4 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 16037 [post_author] => 26 [post_date] => 2019-10-08 15:24:53 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-10-08 22:24:53 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_16041" align="alignright" width="200"] Assistant Professor Baosen Zhang[/caption] ECE assistant professor Baosen Zhang recently attended the 4th InnovationXLab Artificial Intelligence Summit at the Drake Hotel in Chicago, Illinois from Oct. 2-3. The event, hosted by U.S. Secretary of Energy and keynote speaker Rick Perry and the Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory, discussed the DOE's latest AI research and the recent establishment of its Artificial Intelligence and Technology Office (AITO) and Artificial Intelligence Program (DOE AI) to "harness and accelerate the Department’s world-class leadership in high-performance computing, facilities, and team science in applying AI across the entire National Laboratory system to increase the pace of discovery in energy, materials science, health care, transportation, and beyond." Zhang, who researches power systems and cyberphysical systems in the ECE Department at the University of Washington, served on a panel to discuss AI for Energy Grid Optimization, and was the sole representative from the fields of academia and engineering.
“The world is in the midst of the Golden Age of AI, and DOE’s world class scientific and computing capabilities will be critical to securing America’s dominance in this field,” said Secretary Perry.  “This new office housed within the Department of Energy will concentrate our existing efforts while also facilitating partnerships and access to federal data, models and high performance computing resources for America’s AI researchers. Its mission will be to elevate, accelerate and expand DOE’s transformative work to accelerate America’s progress in AI for years to come.”
[caption id="attachment_16042" align="alignleft" width="911"] Zhang speaking on AI for Energy Grid Optimization panel[/caption]                                   More information on the event and these new initiatives can be found on the InnovationXLab's blog page. [post_title] => Assistant professor Baosen Zhang serves as panelist at DOE Artificial Intelligence Summit [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => baosen-zhang-ai [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-10-08 15:28:01 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-10-08 22:28:01 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=16037 [menu_order] => 5 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 16024 [post_author] => 26 [post_date] => 2019-10-07 14:11:14 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-10-07 21:11:14 [post_content] => (re-posted from UW News) A team led by scientists at the University of Washington has designed and tested a 3D-printed metamaterial that can manipulate light with nanoscale precision. As they report in a paper published Oct. 4 in the journal Science Advances, their designed optical element focuses light to discrete points in a 3D helical pattern. The team’s design principles and experimental findings demonstrate that it is possible to model and construct metamaterial devices that can precisely manipulate optical fields with high spatial resolution in three dimensions. Though the team chose a helical pattern — a spiral helix — for their optical element to focus light, their approach could be used to design optical elements that control and focus light in other patterns. Devices with this level of precision control over light could be used not only to miniaturize today’s optical elements, such as lenses or retroreflectors, but also to realize new varieties. In addition, designing optical fields in three dimensions could enable creation of ultra-compact depth sensors for autonomous transportation, as well as optical elements for displays and sensors in virtual- or augmented-reality headsets. Read the full article here. [post_title] => ECE professor Arka Majumdar’s lab creates new metasurface design that can control optical fields in three dimensions [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => arka-majumdar-new-metasurface [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-11-06 11:56:36 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-06 19:56:36 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=16024 [menu_order] => 6 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 6 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 16193 [post_author] => 25 [post_date] => 2019-11-07 15:23:23 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-11-07 23:23:23 [post_content] => Brian Johnson portrait by UW FountainOn November 6, 2019, the U.S. Department of Energy announced it would provide $128 million in funding for 75 projects intending to advance solar technologies through the Solar Energy Technologies Office Fiscal Year 2019 (SETO FY2019) funding program.  This program will provide $50 million for 15 research projects that aim to improve the ability of grid operators to integrate increasing amounts of solar generation onto the grid in a cost-effective, secure, resilient and reliable manner. ECE assistant professor Brian Johnson will be leading the grant for the University of Washington.

University of Washington

Project Name

A Scalable Control Architecture for 100% PV Penetration with Grid Forming Inverters

Project Summary

This project will develop two kinds of grid-forming controls: fast communication-free controls for inverters for solar-plus-storage systems, and slower controls that use a distributed communication architecture for system-wide energy management. These controls will be immune to communication outages and be compatible with small solar energy systems as well as the bulk power grid.

Partners

Enphase Energy, University of Minnesota, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Electric Power Research Institute

Location

Seattle, WA

DOE Award Amount

$4.9 million

Cost Share

$2.1 million
The Solar Energy Technologies Office Fiscal Year 2019 (SETO FY2019) funding program supports projects that will improve the affordability, reliability and performance of solar technologies on the national grid. This program funds projects that advance early-stage systems integration, photovoltaic (PV), and concentrating solar-thermal power technologies and reduce the non-hardware costs associated with installing solar energy systems.

Approach

Systems integration projects will better enable grid operators to add increasing amounts of solar generation onto the grid in a cost-effective, secure, resilient, and reliable manner. The three subtopics will focus on adaptive distribution protection, grid services from behind-the-meter solar and other distributed energy resources, and advanced PV controls and cybersecurity.

Objectives

Projects in this funding program will address the technical challenges facing system operators to integrate higher penetration of solar generation. These projects will result in technologies that improve the protection distribution power system, enhance the visibility and control of PV inverters and plants, and realize the benefits of distributed PV to help supplement grid services while improving the security of those devices from cyberattacks.   Learn more about the SETO FY2019 funding program and the solar office’s other systems integration awards. [post_title] => Assistant professor Brian Johnson leads newly awarded $4.9M DOE grant to improve solar technologies [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => johnsondoe [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-11-13 13:33:55 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-13 21:33:55 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=16193 [menu_order] => 1 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 674 [max_num_pages] => 113 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => 1 [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => 1 [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => c64914061c8ecf9b16abe746203f6ad7 [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => 1 [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed ) [compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ) ) )
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