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ECE welcomes 2018 faculty members

Professors Zurk, Moritz, Li, Orsborn, Johnson and Hussein are the newest members of the ECE community.

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ECE welcomes 2018 faculty members Banner

Electrical Engineering celebrates new name: Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering

UW Department of Electrical Engineering changes name to Electrical & Computer Engineering.

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Electrical Engineering celebrates new name: Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering Banner

Nanofabrication Intensive Short Course

UW EE is pleased to offer a one-week survey course that introduces key nanofabrication techniques, tools and methods.

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Nanofabrication Intensive Short Course Banner

Advancing the world of optics

Electrical Engineering and Physics Professor Arka Majumdar and his team has created an ultra-thin lens that will change the way we see

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Advancing the world of optics Banner

Electrical engineering professors receive NSF grant

Professor Anant Anantram and Professor Eric Klavins won a SemiSynBio grant from the NSF for their research in Highly scalable, random access DNA data storage with nanopore-based reading.

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Electrical engineering professors receive NSF grant Banner

Robotics team heads to China to participate in challenge

UW students will take part in the 2018 RoboMaster competition later this month.

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Robotics team heads to China to participate in challenge Banner

News + Events

https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/ece-welcomes-newest-faculty-members/
https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/electrical-engineering-celebrates-new-name-department-of-electrical-computer-engineering/
https://nanofabcourse.ee.washington.edu/
https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/advancing-the-world-of-optics/
Advancing the world of optics

Advancing the world of optics

Electrical Engineering and Physics Professor Arka Majumdar and his team has created an ultra-thin lens that will change the way we see

https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/electrical-engineering-professors-receive-nsf-grant/
https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/robotics-team-heads-to-china-to-participate-in-challenge/
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Rania Hussein Lecturer, Electrical & Computer Engineering

Research focus: embedded systems, human-machine interaction, image processing, machine learning Rania Hussein joined ECE last summer as a lecturer. For the last ten years, Rania taught courses at all levels in electrical engineering and computer science. Rania held leadership posts in non-profits to promote diversity and the social and educational development of women and youth. She has a record of high ratings from her students, and was a finalist for the distinguished teaching award at UW Bothell in 2017. She previously worked as a research engineer at the Walt Disney Company. She became a senior member of IEEE in 2017.
         

Brian Johnson Assistant Professor, Electrical Engineering

Brian Johnson Ph.D. Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, 2013 M.S. Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, 2009 B.S. Physics, Texas State University, 2008Brian Johnson will join the Electrical Engineering department in the spring as an assistant professor. For the past five years, he has worked at National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado as a staff scientist. While there, he has led projects focused on next-generation control strategies and energy conversion circuits for power systems.At the UW, he will continue his research at the intersection of power electronics, power systems, and control systems. Broadly, he explores the challenges of transforming aging electricity grids to ease the integration of renewables, reduce costs, ensure reliable operation and enhance efficiency. To achieve these aims, he develops technologies that translate the economic needs of consumers into solutions and leverages the capabilities of power electronics to develop agile systems with high performance.He currently serves as an associate editor for the IEEE Transactions on Energy Conversion. He was awarded a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship in 2010.  
 

Mo Li Associate Professor, Electrical & Computer Engineering, Physics

Mo Li

Ph.D. Applied Physics, California Institute of Technology, 2007 M.S. Physics, University of California, San Diego, 2003 B.S. Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, 2001 Mo Li joins the College with a joint position in electrical and computer engineering and the physics department. Since 2010, he served as an assistant professor and then an associate professor with tenure in electrical and computer engineering at the University of Minnesota. At the UW, he plans to continue his work in integrated photonics, developing new device functionalities and materials for optical and wireless communication and sensing applications. His research also incorporates novel two-dimensional and quantum materials in optoelectronic devices and large scale, silicon-based photonic systems for next-generation communication and computation. Mo's distinctions include an NSF CAREER Award in 2014, McKnight Land-Grant Professorship in 2013 and Air Force Office of Scientific Research Young Investigator Award in 2012.  

Chet Mortitz Associate Professor, Electrical & Computer Engineering, Rehabilitation Medicine

  Chet MoritzPh.D. Integrative Biology, University of California, Berkeley, 2003 B.S. Zoology, University of Washington, 1998 Chet Moritz joins ECE in a joint appointment with UW Medicine’s Department of Rehabilitation, where he has been faculty since 2010. He is co-director of the UW’s Center for Neurotechnology (CNT), a research center that leverages transdisciplinary collaborations in medicine and engineering to design novel devices and methods for improving brain and spinal cord injury rehabilitation. In his research, Chet develops techniques to bypass damaged areas of the nervous system and restore control of movement to paralyzed limbs, promoting recovery and potentially regenerating damaged neural tissue. As a 2013 Allen Distinguished Investigator, he and other faculty received $1.5M to design a brain-computer-spinal interface that blends technology, neuroscience and computation to reanimate hand and arm movements after injury. He is currently collaborating with industry partners to test novel stimulation technologies to restore hand and walking function for people with spinal cord injuries, using technique of engineered neuroplasticity to drive long term recovery in the brain and spinal cord.
 

Amy Orsborn Clare Boothe Luce Assistant Professor, Electrical Engineering and Bioengineering

Amy Orsborn Ph.D. Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley; University of California, San Francisco, 2013 B.S. Engineering Physics, concentration in biomedical engineering, Case Western University, 2007Amy Orsborn will join UW this winter as the Clare Boothe Luce Assistant Professor in the departments of Electrical Engineering and Bioengineering. She has spent the last four years as a postdoctoral researcher at New York University’s Center for Neural Science where she helped to develop platforms to stimulate, record and map neural activity across multiple spatial scales.Amy applies neuroscience to improve rehabilitative and restorative therapies and design state-of-the-art prosthetics for people with disabilities such as limb loss, stroke or spinal injury. Her research collects large-scale data sets to develop brain-machine interfaces (BMI) with potential to restore motor-functions and combines brain adaptation with machine learning to make BMIs that provide more natural and intuitive control for patients.In addition to her research, Amy is helping develop a new web-based resource, called STEMM Role Models, aimed to increase diversity in speakers at scientific conferences. Amy has received fellowships from the National Science Foundation and American Heart Association and was named a 2016 L’Oreal For Women in Science Fellow.  
 

Lisa Zurk Professor, Electrical & Computer Engineering

Lisa ZurkPh.D. Electrical Engineering, University of Washington, 1995 M.S. Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering, Northeastern University, 1991 B.S. Electrical Engineering, University of Massachusetts at Amherst, 1985 Lisa Zurk joined the UW last spring as a professor in electrical and computer engineering and executive director of the UW Applied Physics Laboratory (APL-UW). She was most recently a program manager in the Strategic Technologies Office at the Defense Advanced Projects Research Agency (DARPA). She was an APL-UW associate scientist during her tenure at Portland State University (PSU) and a principal investigator in collaborative sponsored research with APL-UW scientists. At PSU, she was a professor of electrical and computer engineering and founded and co-directed the Northwest Electromagnetics and Acoustics Research Laboratory. Lisa previously spent 10 years at MIT's Lincoln Laboratory working on national security programs in the areas of radar signal processing and underwater acoustics for advanced sonar systems. She received the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, an NSF CAREER award and the ONR Early Faculty Award. She was selected as a recipient for a Murdock Grant, an NSF MRI Grant and was a Fulbright scholar.  
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UW Electrical Engineering has changed its name to the Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering (ECE) to expand student opportunities and better reflect current teaching, research and service.

ECE building
By Chelsea Yates The department’s new name — which went into effect on September 16, 2018 — has been widely endorsed by university and college leadership, faculty, students, staff, alumni, advisors and industry leaders. "This is an exciting development for our engineering community. The UW is known for our interdisciplinary environment and the Department of Electrical Engineering and the Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering have a long history of innovation and collaboration. Much of our strength in computer engineering comes from that expertise — at the intersection of computer science and electrical engineering," says Michael B. Bragg, the Frank & Julie Jungers Dean of Engineering. The new name more accurately reflects the department’s research focus and student interest in embedded systems and other hardware digital systems. It also better highlights the close connection between electrical and computer engineering in research and industry. Current industry jobs and entrepreneurial opportunities in hardware-driven computing domains are vast and it is anticipated that this shift will open more opportunities for our students. The name change will not impact the degrees granted. The ECE department will retain its degree program in Electrical Engineering, and the Allen School will retain its degree program in Computer Engineering as well as its degree program in Computer Science. “There is an industry need for electrical engineers that also have a computing background because devices are becoming smarter," said Rico Malvar, chief scientist for Microsoft Research and ECE affiliate professor. "Computing is in everything we do today, including electrical engineering." Much of the UW’s strength in computer engineering arises from faculty — including Shwetak Patel, Joshua Smith, Michael Taylor, Georg Seelig and Linda Shapiro — who are jointly appointed in ECE and the Allen School. These faculty members lead notable research programs such as the Ubicomp Lab, the Sensor Systems Laboratory and the Seelig Lab of Synthetic Biology. "These top caliber faculty attract sought-after graduate students, which feeds the cycle of excellence, and we believe our new name will only strengthen such recruitment efforts," says Radha Poovendran, professor and chair of ECE. "The field of electrical and computer engineering has produced inventions that have changed the world and the way we live. As our department begins a new era, the opportunities for impact are endless."
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"Semiconductor synthetic biology promises to exceed limits of current data storage and processing methods." -- National Science Foundation.

Read more about their award.

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https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/ece-welcomes-newest-faculty-members/
https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/electrical-engineering-celebrates-new-name-department-of-electrical-computer-engineering/
https://nanofabcourse.ee.washington.edu/
https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/advancing-the-world-of-optics/
Advancing the world of optics

Advancing the world of optics

Electrical Engineering and Physics Professor Arka Majumdar and his team has created an ultra-thin lens that will change the way we see

https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/electrical-engineering-professors-receive-nsf-grant/
https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/robotics-team-heads-to-china-to-participate-in-challenge/
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Rania Hussein Lecturer, Electrical & Computer Engineering

Research focus: embedded systems, human-machine interaction, image processing, machine learning Rania Hussein joined ECE last summer as a lecturer. For the last ten years, Rania taught courses at all levels in electrical engineering and computer science. Rania held leadership posts in non-profits to promote diversity and the social and educational development of women and youth. She has a record of high ratings from her students, and was a finalist for the distinguished teaching award at UW Bothell in 2017. She previously worked as a research engineer at the Walt Disney Company. She became a senior member of IEEE in 2017.
         

Brian Johnson Assistant Professor, Electrical Engineering

Brian Johnson Ph.D. Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, 2013 M.S. Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, 2009 B.S. Physics, Texas State University, 2008Brian Johnson will join the Electrical Engineering department in the spring as an assistant professor. For the past five years, he has worked at National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado as a staff scientist. While there, he has led projects focused on next-generation control strategies and energy conversion circuits for power systems.At the UW, he will continue his research at the intersection of power electronics, power systems, and control systems. Broadly, he explores the challenges of transforming aging electricity grids to ease the integration of renewables, reduce costs, ensure reliable operation and enhance efficiency. To achieve these aims, he develops technologies that translate the economic needs of consumers into solutions and leverages the capabilities of power electronics to develop agile systems with high performance.He currently serves as an associate editor for the IEEE Transactions on Energy Conversion. He was awarded a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship in 2010.  
 

Mo Li Associate Professor, Electrical & Computer Engineering, Physics

Mo Li

Ph.D. Applied Physics, California Institute of Technology, 2007 M.S. Physics, University of California, San Diego, 2003 B.S. Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, 2001 Mo Li joins the College with a joint position in electrical and computer engineering and the physics department. Since 2010, he served as an assistant professor and then an associate professor with tenure in electrical and computer engineering at the University of Minnesota. At the UW, he plans to continue his work in integrated photonics, developing new device functionalities and materials for optical and wireless communication and sensing applications. His research also incorporates novel two-dimensional and quantum materials in optoelectronic devices and large scale, silicon-based photonic systems for next-generation communication and computation. Mo's distinctions include an NSF CAREER Award in 2014, McKnight Land-Grant Professorship in 2013 and Air Force Office of Scientific Research Young Investigator Award in 2012.  

Chet Mortitz Associate Professor, Electrical & Computer Engineering, Rehabilitation Medicine

  Chet MoritzPh.D. Integrative Biology, University of California, Berkeley, 2003 B.S. Zoology, University of Washington, 1998 Chet Moritz joins ECE in a joint appointment with UW Medicine’s Department of Rehabilitation, where he has been faculty since 2010. He is co-director of the UW’s Center for Neurotechnology (CNT), a research center that leverages transdisciplinary collaborations in medicine and engineering to design novel devices and methods for improving brain and spinal cord injury rehabilitation. In his research, Chet develops techniques to bypass damaged areas of the nervous system and restore control of movement to paralyzed limbs, promoting recovery and potentially regenerating damaged neural tissue. As a 2013 Allen Distinguished Investigator, he and other faculty received $1.5M to design a brain-computer-spinal interface that blends technology, neuroscience and computation to reanimate hand and arm movements after injury. He is currently collaborating with industry partners to test novel stimulation technologies to restore hand and walking function for people with spinal cord injuries, using technique of engineered neuroplasticity to drive long term recovery in the brain and spinal cord.
 

Amy Orsborn Clare Boothe Luce Assistant Professor, Electrical Engineering and Bioengineering

Amy Orsborn Ph.D. Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley; University of California, San Francisco, 2013 B.S. Engineering Physics, concentration in biomedical engineering, Case Western University, 2007Amy Orsborn will join UW this winter as the Clare Boothe Luce Assistant Professor in the departments of Electrical Engineering and Bioengineering. She has spent the last four years as a postdoctoral researcher at New York University’s Center for Neural Science where she helped to develop platforms to stimulate, record and map neural activity across multiple spatial scales.Amy applies neuroscience to improve rehabilitative and restorative therapies and design state-of-the-art prosthetics for people with disabilities such as limb loss, stroke or spinal injury. Her research collects large-scale data sets to develop brain-machine interfaces (BMI) with potential to restore motor-functions and combines brain adaptation with machine learning to make BMIs that provide more natural and intuitive control for patients.In addition to her research, Amy is helping develop a new web-based resource, called STEMM Role Models, aimed to increase diversity in speakers at scientific conferences. Amy has received fellowships from the National Science Foundation and American Heart Association and was named a 2016 L’Oreal For Women in Science Fellow.  
 

Lisa Zurk Professor, Electrical & Computer Engineering

Lisa ZurkPh.D. Electrical Engineering, University of Washington, 1995 M.S. Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering, Northeastern University, 1991 B.S. Electrical Engineering, University of Massachusetts at Amherst, 1985 Lisa Zurk joined the UW last spring as a professor in electrical and computer engineering and executive director of the UW Applied Physics Laboratory (APL-UW). She was most recently a program manager in the Strategic Technologies Office at the Defense Advanced Projects Research Agency (DARPA). She was an APL-UW associate scientist during her tenure at Portland State University (PSU) and a principal investigator in collaborative sponsored research with APL-UW scientists. At PSU, she was a professor of electrical and computer engineering and founded and co-directed the Northwest Electromagnetics and Acoustics Research Laboratory. Lisa previously spent 10 years at MIT's Lincoln Laboratory working on national security programs in the areas of radar signal processing and underwater acoustics for advanced sonar systems. She received the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, an NSF CAREER award and the ONR Early Faculty Award. She was selected as a recipient for a Murdock Grant, an NSF MRI Grant and was a Fulbright scholar.  
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UW Electrical Engineering has changed its name to the Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering (ECE) to expand student opportunities and better reflect current teaching, research and service.

ECE building
By Chelsea Yates The department’s new name — which went into effect on September 16, 2018 — has been widely endorsed by university and college leadership, faculty, students, staff, alumni, advisors and industry leaders. "This is an exciting development for our engineering community. The UW is known for our interdisciplinary environment and the Department of Electrical Engineering and the Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering have a long history of innovation and collaboration. Much of our strength in computer engineering comes from that expertise — at the intersection of computer science and electrical engineering," says Michael B. Bragg, the Frank & Julie Jungers Dean of Engineering. The new name more accurately reflects the department’s research focus and student interest in embedded systems and other hardware digital systems. It also better highlights the close connection between electrical and computer engineering in research and industry. Current industry jobs and entrepreneurial opportunities in hardware-driven computing domains are vast and it is anticipated that this shift will open more opportunities for our students. The name change will not impact the degrees granted. The ECE department will retain its degree program in Electrical Engineering, and the Allen School will retain its degree program in Computer Engineering as well as its degree program in Computer Science. “There is an industry need for electrical engineers that also have a computing background because devices are becoming smarter," said Rico Malvar, chief scientist for Microsoft Research and ECE affiliate professor. "Computing is in everything we do today, including electrical engineering." Much of the UW’s strength in computer engineering arises from faculty — including Shwetak Patel, Joshua Smith, Michael Taylor, Georg Seelig and Linda Shapiro — who are jointly appointed in ECE and the Allen School. These faculty members lead notable research programs such as the Ubicomp Lab, the Sensor Systems Laboratory and the Seelig Lab of Synthetic Biology. "These top caliber faculty attract sought-after graduate students, which feeds the cycle of excellence, and we believe our new name will only strengthen such recruitment efforts," says Radha Poovendran, professor and chair of ECE. "The field of electrical and computer engineering has produced inventions that have changed the world and the way we live. As our department begins a new era, the opportunities for impact are endless."
[post_title] => Electrical Engineering celebrates new name: Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => electrical-engineering-celebrates-new-name-department-of-electrical-computer-engineering [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-09-21 11:03:49 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-09-21 18:03:49 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://hedy2018.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=13407 [menu_order] => 2 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 13353 [post_author] => 22 [post_date] => 2018-08-01 13:04:38 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-08-01 20:04:38 [post_content] => [post_title] => Nanofabrication Intensive Short Course [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => nanofabrication-intensive-short-course [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-08-01 13:13:58 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-08-01 20:13:58 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=13353 [menu_order] => 3 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 13321 [post_author] => 22 [post_date] => 2018-07-24 15:41:17 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-07-24 22:41:17 [post_content] => When it comes to lenses, we expect a lot: perfect zooming capability on our camera phones, a flawless 3D visualization experience with augmented reality glasses, and compact and simplified variations of microscopes. Traditional glass lenses have limitations on how much they can do. Metasurface optics—which are ultra-thin, manufactured, man-made surfaces—are advancing the world of optics. In a paper published in July in Optica, researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Physics at the University of Washington announced that they created a thin optical component to transcend the capability of a regular lens. “This lens is very thin, close to one micron, which has the thickness of 1/100th of a strand of hair,” said senior author Arka Majumdar, assistant professor of electrical engineering and physics. “We wanted to make a very small optical component to create more advanced, tunable flat optics.” Their design consisted of two metasurfaces, which are nano-patterned films of material that can very abruptly change properties of light. The two metasurfaces work together to form what is called an Alvarez lens, a lens that has a focal length that can be changed by moving the two metasurfaces past one another sideways. To build their device, they used similar fabrication techniques compared to what are used to make the electronic chips found in phones and computers. The researchers also developed fabrication techniques to build large-area metalenses, with hundred’s of millions nano-scale scatterers. To fabricate such a massive number of scatterers, they developed a compression algorithm to generate the pattern used for fabricating the devices. Using the fabricated Alvarez metalens, Majumdar and his team reported the largest tunable focal length range for an optical metasurface demonstrated to date. They also demonstrated zoom imaging at visible frequencies with a metasurface for the first time. Previously they reported full-color imaging at visible wavelengths using computational imaging along with a new type of metalens. “We plan to now bring those computational techniques together with our large area fabrication and tunable lenses to create optical systems, with potential applications in mixed reality systems,” said Majumdar. There is already strong interest from various companies in similar research and this specific work was funded by Samsung and Amazon. [caption id="attachment_13323" align="alignleft" width="1024"]The two cubic metasurfaces can be laterally displaced to create a tunable focal lens. The metasurfaces are large with millions of nano-scatterers. The two cubic metasurfaces can be laterally displaced to create a tunable focal lens. The metasurfaces are large with millions of nano-scatterers.[/caption] [post_title] => Advancing the world of optics [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => advancing-the-world-of-optics [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-07-24 16:07:45 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-07-24 23:07:45 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=13321 [menu_order] => 4 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 13315 [post_author] => 22 [post_date] => 2018-07-19 16:49:25 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-07-19 23:49:25 [post_content] =>

"Semiconductor synthetic biology promises to exceed limits of current data storage and processing methods." -- National Science Foundation.

Read more about their award.

[post_title] => Electrical engineering professors receive NSF grant [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => electrical-engineering-professors-receive-nsf-grant [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-09-19 11:37:29 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-09-19 18:37:29 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=13315 [menu_order] => 5 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 13303 [post_author] => 22 [post_date] => 2018-07-12 09:48:57 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-07-12 16:48:57 [post_content] => Electrical engineering students participating in the UW Advanced Robotics team are heading to Shenzen, China later this month to take part in RoboMaster 2018, the world’s leading robotics competition. Designed to “pit university students against each other in the ultimate battle of engineering,” according to the RoboMaster site, the international challenge is hosting 185 colleges, including UW. The university’s team, which is co-sponsored by the Department of Electrical Engineering and advised by Blake Hannaford, professor of electrical engineering, is comprised of 25 students, one drone and seven hand-built robots. The winning team will win a $75,000 prize. __ Related: These attack robots and their UW creators will take on the world at RoboMaster competition in China DJI is turning robot battles into the next college sport--advantage China Advanced Robotics at the University of Washington     [post_title] => Robotics team heads to China to participate in challenge [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => robotics-team-heads-to-china-to-participate-in-challenge [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-07-30 13:52:17 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-07-30 20:52:17 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=13303 [menu_order] => 6 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 6 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 13492 [post_author] => 22 [post_date] => 2018-09-19 14:23:27 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-09-19 21:23:27 [post_content] =>

Rania Hussein Lecturer, Electrical & Computer Engineering

Research focus: embedded systems, human-machine interaction, image processing, machine learning Rania Hussein joined ECE last summer as a lecturer. For the last ten years, Rania taught courses at all levels in electrical engineering and computer science. Rania held leadership posts in non-profits to promote diversity and the social and educational development of women and youth. She has a record of high ratings from her students, and was a finalist for the distinguished teaching award at UW Bothell in 2017. She previously worked as a research engineer at the Walt Disney Company. She became a senior member of IEEE in 2017.
         

Brian Johnson Assistant Professor, Electrical Engineering

Brian Johnson Ph.D. Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, 2013 M.S. Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, 2009 B.S. Physics, Texas State University, 2008Brian Johnson will join the Electrical Engineering department in the spring as an assistant professor. For the past five years, he has worked at National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado as a staff scientist. While there, he has led projects focused on next-generation control strategies and energy conversion circuits for power systems.At the UW, he will continue his research at the intersection of power electronics, power systems, and control systems. Broadly, he explores the challenges of transforming aging electricity grids to ease the integration of renewables, reduce costs, ensure reliable operation and enhance efficiency. To achieve these aims, he develops technologies that translate the economic needs of consumers into solutions and leverages the capabilities of power electronics to develop agile systems with high performance.He currently serves as an associate editor for the IEEE Transactions on Energy Conversion. He was awarded a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship in 2010.  
 

Mo Li Associate Professor, Electrical & Computer Engineering, Physics

Mo Li

Ph.D. Applied Physics, California Institute of Technology, 2007 M.S. Physics, University of California, San Diego, 2003 B.S. Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, 2001 Mo Li joins the College with a joint position in electrical and computer engineering and the physics department. Since 2010, he served as an assistant professor and then an associate professor with tenure in electrical and computer engineering at the University of Minnesota. At the UW, he plans to continue his work in integrated photonics, developing new device functionalities and materials for optical and wireless communication and sensing applications. His research also incorporates novel two-dimensional and quantum materials in optoelectronic devices and large scale, silicon-based photonic systems for next-generation communication and computation. Mo's distinctions include an NSF CAREER Award in 2014, McKnight Land-Grant Professorship in 2013 and Air Force Office of Scientific Research Young Investigator Award in 2012.  

Chet Mortitz Associate Professor, Electrical & Computer Engineering, Rehabilitation Medicine

  Chet MoritzPh.D. Integrative Biology, University of California, Berkeley, 2003 B.S. Zoology, University of Washington, 1998 Chet Moritz joins ECE in a joint appointment with UW Medicine’s Department of Rehabilitation, where he has been faculty since 2010. He is co-director of the UW’s Center for Neurotechnology (CNT), a research center that leverages transdisciplinary collaborations in medicine and engineering to design novel devices and methods for improving brain and spinal cord injury rehabilitation. In his research, Chet develops techniques to bypass damaged areas of the nervous system and restore control of movement to paralyzed limbs, promoting recovery and potentially regenerating damaged neural tissue. As a 2013 Allen Distinguished Investigator, he and other faculty received $1.5M to design a brain-computer-spinal interface that blends technology, neuroscience and computation to reanimate hand and arm movements after injury. He is currently collaborating with industry partners to test novel stimulation technologies to restore hand and walking function for people with spinal cord injuries, using technique of engineered neuroplasticity to drive long term recovery in the brain and spinal cord.
 

Amy Orsborn Clare Boothe Luce Assistant Professor, Electrical Engineering and Bioengineering

Amy Orsborn Ph.D. Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley; University of California, San Francisco, 2013 B.S. Engineering Physics, concentration in biomedical engineering, Case Western University, 2007Amy Orsborn will join UW this winter as the Clare Boothe Luce Assistant Professor in the departments of Electrical Engineering and Bioengineering. She has spent the last four years as a postdoctoral researcher at New York University’s Center for Neural Science where she helped to develop platforms to stimulate, record and map neural activity across multiple spatial scales.Amy applies neuroscience to improve rehabilitative and restorative therapies and design state-of-the-art prosthetics for people with disabilities such as limb loss, stroke or spinal injury. Her research collects large-scale data sets to develop brain-machine interfaces (BMI) with potential to restore motor-functions and combines brain adaptation with machine learning to make BMIs that provide more natural and intuitive control for patients.In addition to her research, Amy is helping develop a new web-based resource, called STEMM Role Models, aimed to increase diversity in speakers at scientific conferences. Amy has received fellowships from the National Science Foundation and American Heart Association and was named a 2016 L’Oreal For Women in Science Fellow.  
 

Lisa Zurk Professor, Electrical & Computer Engineering

Lisa ZurkPh.D. Electrical Engineering, University of Washington, 1995 M.S. Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering, Northeastern University, 1991 B.S. Electrical Engineering, University of Massachusetts at Amherst, 1985 Lisa Zurk joined the UW last spring as a professor in electrical and computer engineering and executive director of the UW Applied Physics Laboratory (APL-UW). She was most recently a program manager in the Strategic Technologies Office at the Defense Advanced Projects Research Agency (DARPA). She was an APL-UW associate scientist during her tenure at Portland State University (PSU) and a principal investigator in collaborative sponsored research with APL-UW scientists. At PSU, she was a professor of electrical and computer engineering and founded and co-directed the Northwest Electromagnetics and Acoustics Research Laboratory. Lisa previously spent 10 years at MIT's Lincoln Laboratory working on national security programs in the areas of radar signal processing and underwater acoustics for advanced sonar systems. She received the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, an NSF CAREER award and the ONR Early Faculty Award. She was selected as a recipient for a Murdock Grant, an NSF MRI Grant and was a Fulbright scholar.  
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