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UW ECE Launches New BSECE Degree Program

UW ECE honors and celebrates the retirements of four outstanding faculty members

We congratulate and offer our deepest gratitude to UW ECE Professors Howard Chizeck, Bruce Darling, Yasuo Kuga and Ming-Ting Sun, recent retirees who have left an impactful legacy of service.

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UW ECE honors and celebrates the retirements of four outstanding faculty members Banner

Diane Jurgens from The Walt Disney Company to speak at UW ECE Graduation

UW ECE alumna Diane Jurgens (BSEE ‘85, MSEE ‘86) will speak at this year's graduation ceremony. She has over three decades of experience as an international business and technology leader and is currently Executive Vice President and Chief Information Officer at the Walt Disney Company.

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Diane Jurgens from The Walt Disney Company to speak at UW ECE Graduation Banner

UW research team uses sound waves to move ‘excitons’ further than ever before, leading toward faster and more energy efficient electronics and optical devices

A team led by UW ECE Professor Mo Li has developed a way of using sound waves to move subatomic quasiparticles known as ‘excitons’ further than ever before — leading to a faster, more energy-efficient computing circuit.

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UW research team uses sound waves to move ‘excitons’ further than ever before, leading toward faster and more energy efficient electronics and optical devices Banner

Chaya family establishes new, need-based scholarship for outstanding UW ECE undergraduates

The Chaya Family Endowed Scholarship, recently established by UW ECE graduate Boon Chaya (BSEE ‘78) and his wife, Chieko, will recognize and support UW ECE undergraduates from low-income and underprivileged backgrounds.

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Chaya family establishes new, need-based scholarship for outstanding UW ECE undergraduates Banner

UW ECE launches new undergraduate degree program to reflect cutting-edge research and provide greater flexibility for students

This fall, UW ECE will begin offering a Bachelor of Science in Electrical and Computer Engineering (BSECE). The new degree program provides students with increased flexibility and is highly adaptable to advances in technology.

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UW ECE launches new undergraduate degree program to reflect cutting-edge research and provide greater flexibility for students Banner

UW NanoES announces awardees of Northwest Nanotechnology Infrastructure seed grants

UW ECE Assistant Professor Sara Mouradian has been awarded a UW NanoES grant to research "Fabrication of Doped Silicon Ion Traps."

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UW NanoES announces awardees of Northwest Nanotechnology Infrastructure seed grants Banner

News + Events

https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/uw-ece-honors-and-celebrates-the-retirements-of-four-outstanding-faculty-members/
https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/2022-graduation-diane-jurgens/
Diane Jurgens from The Walt Disney Company to speak at UW ECE Graduation

Diane Jurgens from The Walt Disney Company to speak at UW ECE Graduation

UW ECE alumna Diane Jurgens (BSEE ‘85, MSEE ‘86) will speak at this year's graduation ceremony. She has over three decades of experience as an international business and technology leader and is currently Executive Vice President and Chief Information Officer at the Walt Disney Company.

https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/mo-li-excitons/
https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/chaya-family-scholarship/
https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/bsece/
https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/sara-mouradian-northwest-nanotechnology-infrastructure-seed-grant/
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                    [post_content] => By Wayne Gillam | UW ECE News

[caption id="attachment_26857" align="alignright" width="575"]Howard Chizeck, Bruce Darling, Yasuo Kuga, Ming-Ting Sun headshots UW ECE Professors Howard Chizeck, Bruce Darling, Yasuo Kuga and Ming-Ting Sun (left to right) are all leaders in their respective fields and leave an impactful legacy of service to the Department, its students, the College of Engineering and the University at large.[/caption]

It is not often that an exceptional faculty member with decades of service retires from the Department, and it is even less common for several faculty members to retire within a relatively short period of time. But recently, that is exactly what has happened at UW ECE. Between July 2020 and the end of spring quarter this year, four distinguished professors have announced their retirement or will be retiring soon.

Howard Chizeck, Bruce Darling, Yasuo Kuga and Ming-Ting Sun are all leaders in their respective fields and leave an impactful legacy of service to the Department, its students, the College of Engineering and the University at large. A live, in-person event was held at UW ECE on Thursday, May 26 to honor and celebrate Chizeck and Darling’s retirements.

“We at UW ECE are deeply grateful for the many years of service Howard, Bruce, Yasuo and Ming-Ting have provided the Department, the College and the University,” UW ECE Professor and Chair Eric Klavins said. “The impact on their respective fields and on our students cannot be overstated. We will miss them greatly but wish them all the best as they move forward into this new chapter of their lives.”

Read on to learn more about these professors’ exceptional careers. The overviews below by no means can capture all their many accomplishments, but the summaries provide a general sense of these outstanding faculty members and their lasting impact.

[caption id="attachment_26842" align="alignleft" width="200"]Howard Chizeck headshot UW ECE Professor Emeritus Howard Chizeck[/caption]

Howard Chizeck

Professor Emeritus Howard Chizeck retired on July 1, 2020. He was with the Department for 22 years. Over his career, he served as a faculty member and department chair at two major research universities, Case Western University and the University of Washington. At the UW, he served as UW EE chair from 1998 to 2003. During his tenure as chair, the Department thrived despite difficult financial times for the University. Research activity and funding rapidly increased under Chizeck’s leadership. He also led the Department to a more student-centered approach to education, overseeing curriculum revision and improvements to student services such as advising. During his tenure, graduate student recruitment and participation in undergraduate research increased and the Department recruited an outstanding group of new faculty. As a result, UW EE moved up significantly in rankings and increased its national visibility and stature. Chizeck’s research interests include telerobotics and neural engineering. During his time at UW ECE, he was co-director of the UW BioRobotics Laboratory, adjunct professor of bioengineering at the UW and a research thrust leader at the Center for Neurotechnology. His telerobotic research included haptic navigation and control for robotic surgery and for underwater devices, as well as security of telerobotic systems. His neural engineering work involved the design and security of brain-machine interfaces and the development of assistive devices to restore hand and locomotive capabilities. Chizeck was elected as an IEEE Fellow in 1999 for his contributions to the use of control system theory in biomedical engineering, and he is now an IEEE Life Fellow. He was elected to the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering College of Fellows in 2011 for contributions to the use of control system theory in functional electrical stimulation assisted walking. From 2008 to 2012, he was a member of the Science Technology Advisory Panel of the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory. Throughout his career, Chizeck was heavily involved with several startup companies, including being a founder of ControlSoft, Inc. in Cleveland, Ohio. He was also a founder and is currently chair of the Board of Directors at Olis Robotics, which was established in 2013 as a UW spinoff. [caption id="attachment_26844" align="alignleft" width="200"]Bruce Darling headshot UW ECE Professor Bruce Darling[/caption]

Bruce Darling

Professor Bruce Darling will retire on September 15, 2022. He has been with the Department for 37 years. He served as UW EE acting chair from 2003 to 2004 and UW ECE interim chair winter quarter 2020. During his time at UW ECE, Darling has held numerous leadership roles within the Department, including serving as ABET coordinator for the BSEE program, graduate program coordinator and associate chair for education. Since joining the Department in 1985, Darling has regularly taught courses in electronic circuits and devices, analog circuit design, photodetection, semiconductor devices, microfabrication, medical instrumentation and senior project design. He has also developed instructional curriculum and laboratories for undergraduate electronics, introductory radio frequency electronics and the first hands-on microfabrication laboratory at the UW in 1995. He co-founded and directed the Center for Applied Microtechnology and the UW EE Microfabrication Laboratory, which operated from 1997 to 2020. His research has covered many different areas of integrated sensor development, including integrated circuit design; novel optoelectronic devices, electronic materials and processing techniques; and medical devices. In 2003, Darling was an electrical engineering forensic investigator on the NASA Space Shuttle Orbiter Columbia Accident Investigation Board. He has also participated in several NASA expeditions to the Atacama Desert and high Andean volcanoes of Chile and Bolivia, coordinating field communications and electrical power. Darling is a registered professional engineer in Washington state and actively consults with local industry and startups on electronic product development and new electronic device concepts. He is a co-founder and serves on the board of directors of PhysioWave, Inc. Over the past decade, Darling has also served as a faculty adviser for several student organizations and competitions, including EcoCAR, Washington Superbike, Formula SAE and the Tau Beta Pi engineering honor society. [caption id="attachment_26846" align="alignleft" width="200"]Yasuo Kuga headshot UW ECE Professor Yasuo Kuga[/caption]

Yasuo Kuga

Professor Yasuo Kuga will retire on June 15, 2022. He has been with the Department as a faculty member for 31 years. He received his B.S., M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from UW EE in 1977, 1979 and 1983, respectively. From 1983 to 1988, he was a Research Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering at the UW. From 1988 to 1991, he was an Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at The University of Michigan. Since 1991, he has been with the UW. Kuga’s research interests are millimeter-wave and microwave remote sensing of geophysical media, millimeter wave scattering from rough surfaces and random media, imaging through random media, laser light scattering, material development and characterization, antenna design, and microwave system design. He has published four book chapters, 90 journal articles and over 200 conference papers and abstracts. Kuga is a member of Commissions B and F of the International Union of Radio Science. His work in IEEE and other technical societies includes (1) Professional journal editorial activities: Associate Editor, IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing (1996–2000), Associate Editor, Radio Science (1993–1996), Co-Guest Editor, Special Issue, IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, based on IGARSS '98, and (2) Conference organization activities: IEEE IGARSS '98 Technical Co-Chair, IEEE AP/URSI 1994 and 2011 Steering Committee, Radar Conference 2017, Technical Co-Chair. Kuga has received several awards for his work including a 1989 National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator Award, being named an IEEE Fellow in 2004, a NASA Board Award for NTR no. 42391: JPL, May 2007, and he was named an IEEE Life Fellow in 2017. [caption id="attachment_26847" align="alignleft" width="200"]Ming-Ting Sun headshot UW ECE Professor Emeritus Ming-Ting Sun[/caption]

Ming-Ting Sun

Professor Emeritus Ming-Ting Sun retired on December 15, 2021. He has been with the Department for 26 years. Prior to joining the University in 1996, he was the director of video signal processing research at Bellcore. Over his career, Sun has been a chaired or visiting professor at several universities. His main research interests are video and multimedia signal processing. Sun holds 13 patents and has published close to 300 technical papers, including 17 book chapters covering video and multimedia technologies. He also co-edited a book titled, “Compressed Video over Networks” and has guest-edited 12 special issues for various journals. He served as an editor-in-chief for three technical journals: Journal for Visual Communication and Image Representation (JVCI) from 2012 to 2016, IEEE Transactions on Multimedia (TMM) from 2000 to 2001, and IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems for Video Technology (TCSVT) from 1995 to 1997. He received the TCSVT Best Paper Award in 1993 and has provided the keynote address for several international conferences. He was a Distinguished Lecturer of the Circuits and Systems Society from 2000 to 2001, and he received an IEEE CASS Golden Jubilee Medal in 2000. Sun served as a general co-chair of the IEEE International Conference on Multimedia and Expo (ICME) in 2016, was an honorary chair of the Visual Communication and Image Processing (VCIP) conference in 2015 and was a general co-chair of VCIP 2000. He also served as the chair of the Visual Signal Processing and Communications (VSPC) Technical Committee of IEEE Circuits and Systems (CAS) Society from 1993 to 1994. From 1988 to 1991, he was the chairman of the IEEE CAS Standards Committee and established the IEEE Inverse Discrete Cosine Transform Standard. He became an IEEE Fellow in 1996, and in 2020 received the honor of becoming an IEEE Life Fellow. [post_title] => UW ECE honors and celebrates the retirements of four outstanding faculty members [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => uw-ece-honors-and-celebrates-the-retirements-of-four-outstanding-faculty-members [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2022-05-27 10:08:33 [post_modified_gmt] => 2022-05-27 17:08:33 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=26833 [menu_order] => 1 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 26804 [post_author] => 27 [post_date] => 2022-05-19 09:09:08 [post_date_gmt] => 2022-05-19 16:09:08 [post_content] => By Wayne Gillam | UW ECE News [caption id="attachment_26809" align="alignright" width="550"]Diane Jurgens headshot UW ECE alumna Diane Jurgens will be guest speaker for the Department’s 2022 graduation ceremony. Jurgens has over three decades of experience as an international business and technology leader, and she is currently Executive Vice President and Chief Information Officer at the Walt Disney Company.[/caption] The University of Washington Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering is proud to announce UW ECE alumna Diane Jurgens (BSEE ‘85, MSEE ‘86), as guest speaker for the Department’s 2022 graduation ceremony. Jurgens has over three decades of experience as an international business and technology leader, and she is currently Executive Vice President and Chief Information Officer at the Walt Disney Company. The graduation ceremony will take place in the Alaska Airlines Arena at Hec Edmundson Pavilion on Wednesday, June 8, from 7 to 9 p.m. The event will include 2022, 2021 and 2020 graduating classes and will be presided over by UW ECE Professor and Chair Eric Klavins. “We are thrilled to have Diane as guest speaker for graduation this year,” Klavins said. “She has had an impressive number of achievements over her career and her leadership in technology and innovation has had significant global impact. She truly is one of our most outstanding alumni, demonstrating how a person can achieve their dreams with a degree from our Department serving as their foundation.” At Disney, Jurgens oversees the company’s global Enterprise Technology team whose purpose is to connect, empower and protect the Disney magic. Her organization includes digital transformation, user experience, core platforms, networking, and cloud computing — ensuring strategic relevance and operational effectiveness. She is also responsible for Global Information Security across the Company. Before joining Disney in October 2020, Jurgens was based in Singapore as Chief Technology Officer for BHP, a multinational mining, metals and petroleum company. There, she was responsible for the technology strategy and transformation to enable BHP’s vision to bring people and resources together to build a better world. Her leadership at BHP was recognized in 2018 by AFR Magazine, which named her as one of Australia’s top five technology influencers for turning BHP from a ‘fast follower’ into a digital leader. Over her career, Jurgens has held senior executive positions and led technology teams in 25 different countries — driving innovation on a worldwide scale. Her roles prior to BHP include 10 years in China as President and Managing Director of Shanghai OnStar Telematics and Chief Information Officer for General Motors’ International Operations. Early in her career, she held a number of executive leadership and engineering roles at Boeing. She has received numerous awards recognizing her leadership abilities, including a 2013 Magnolia Award from the Shanghai Government Office of Foreign Affairs for making a significant contribution to the city’s economy, business environment, international relations, community development and management standards. Most recently, Jurgens was named one of the top 10 women in technology in the U.S. by Technology Magazine. In addition to her long list of accomplishments, Jurgens has deep expertise in telematics, intelligent transportation systems, cybersecurity, data science, robotics, machine learning, Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT), advanced sensors and artificial intelligence. She is also an advocate for STEM education and neurodiversity programs. Those attending this year’s graduation ceremony can look forward to hearing from an exceptionally accomplished alum who has a wealth of knowledge and leadership experience to share from a global perspective. [post_title] => Diane Jurgens from The Walt Disney Company to speak at UW ECE Graduation [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => 2022-graduation-diane-jurgens [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2022-05-19 09:24:33 [post_modified_gmt] => 2022-05-19 16:24:33 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=26804 [menu_order] => 2 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 26727 [post_author] => 27 [post_date] => 2022-05-12 10:18:51 [post_date_gmt] => 2022-05-12 17:18:51 [post_content] => By Wayne Gillam | UW ECE News [caption id="attachment_26758" align="alignright" width="575"]Illustration of atomic layers that hold excitons A research team led by UW ECE Professor Mo Li has developed a method of using soundwaves to move subatomic quasiparticles known as ‘excitons’ a much greater distance than ever before possible. The team’s innovations lead the way to development of a new type of computing circuit, one that is faster and much more energy efficient, using light and quantum phenomena to store, process and transmit information. Shown above: an illustration of the 2D material (tungsten diselenide) Li and his team used to capture and move the excitons. The material layers are each only one atom thick, which for practical purposes, makes them two-dimensional. The layers are flanked by devices that generate sound waves capable of moving excitons relatively long distances. Illustration provided by Ruoming Peng[/caption] Most people have probably never heard of an ‘exciton' before. But scientists and engineers have been working with excitons for some time now, seeking ways to unlock the potential these subatomic quasiparticles have to revolutionize modern electronic circuitry and optics in commonly used devices such as solar panels and light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Excitons are considered quasiparticles because they are quantum phenomena resulting from the interaction between two particles within solid matter. An exciton is created when an electron absorbs light (in the form of a photon) and jumps to a higher energy state, leaving a ‘hole’ behind in its previous position — something akin to a tiny bubble floating in water. The negatively charged electron and the positively charged hole remain bound together by electrostatic forces, and together they form what is known as an exciton. Once the electron falls back into the hole, it emits a photon, and the exciton ceases to exist. Excitons contain internal quantum properties that can be used to store information transmitted through light. And because excitons are charge-neutral — the negatively charged electron and the positively charged hole cancel each other out — they escape energy-scattering losses from electrically-charged disorder or lattice vibration, which makes today’s electronic circuitry unpleasantly hot and drains the battery fast. These qualities make excitons promising candidates for increasing the speed and energy efficiency of computing and a wide range of electronic and optical devices. However, a big challenge for engineers is the fact that excitons are temporary, typically lasting only a few microseconds at most. So, finding ways to stabilize excitons and move them in a controlled direction beyond the short distance in which they naturally diffuse and disappear is a crucial step toward engineering energy-efficient exciton circuits capable of replacing standard circuits in modern electronics. Over the last two years, a University of Washington research team led by Mo Li, a professor in the electrical and computer engineering department and the physics department, has developed an innovative way to use sound waves to transport excitons over the distances needed to create exciton transistors, switches and transducers — the building blocks of exciton circuitry. In a recent paper published in Nature Communications, Li and his team demonstrate how they were able to extend exciton life and use sound waves to move these quasiparticles distances over 10 times further than what other researchers have been able to achieve to date. “In our innovation, we used two atomic layers of 2D materials (tungsten diselenide) stacked on top of each other. When light is applied and excitons form, the electrons separate out into one layer and the holes they leave behind go into the other,” Li explained. “The electrons and the holes are still close enough to each other to remain bonded together, and because they are on separate layers, it’s much harder for them to recombine. This makes the excitons live much, much longer — more than 10 times longer than they would on a single layer. From there, we used acoustic waves to move the excitons further than has ever been achieved before.”

Laying the groundwork for exciton circuits

[caption id="attachment_26737" align="alignright" width="525"]Mo Li headshot UW ECE Professor Mo Li, who is also a professor in the physics department, led the UW team that made this research advance. Li is also a member of the steering committee for the Quantum X Initiative at the UW and a member of the Institute for Nano-Engineered Systems (NanoES).[/caption] In their experiments, the team was able to transport excitons far beyond the diffusion limit — the distance from its origin at which an exciton naturally recombines — moving them 20 microns in a controlled direction at 100 K (-280° F). They also demonstrated success transporting excitons well beyond the diffusion limit at room temperature. A distance of 20 microns may not seem very far, but it is over 10 times further than the exciton’s natural diffusion limit, which is far enough to demonstrate the viability of exciton circuitry. And until now, most research teams have only been able to move excitons a few microns in similar 2D materials. “The reason we demonstrated moving the excitons 20 microns is because our material is 20 microns wide,” said Ruoming Peng, the paper’s lead author. “If the material were larger, say 100 microns (a typical size for sophisticated electronic circuitry), we could move them that far using stronger sound waves. We are only limited by the size of the device.” Excitons are unresponsive to an electrical charge because they are charge-neutral, but when struck by sound waves, these quasiparticles will move in the direction the waves travel. A key innovation by the team was orienting sound waves perpendicular to the plane of the atomic layers that contained the excitons. “Our main innovation here was to generate a primarily vertical acoustic field but not a horizontal field,” Peng explained. “We used that vertical field, which oscillates and moves, to push the excitons away, along the direction in which the sound wave propagates. You could say that the excitons were ‘surfing’ the sound wave! Prior to this innovation, excitons could not survive and would dissociate with the surface acoustic wave. Our group was able to suppress the detrimental effect of the acoustic wave but keep the beneficial effect.”

A bright future for excitons

This work shows that sound waves are an effective, contact-free means to shuttle excitons over relatively long distances in a controlled direction. And that means exciton circuits are a real possibility for the future, leading to faster and more energy efficient computing and optical devices such as LEDs, better sensing and detection devices, and improved speed and efficiency within electronics we use every day. Next steps for Li’s research team include building on their findings by constructing a large-scale exciton circuit prototype, one that can store, manipulate and transmit data through light and the quantum information inherent to these quasiparticles. “This advance is very exciting. It shows that we can build a much larger exciton circuit than before, and possibly at room temperature,” Li said. “We can move excitons from one end of a computer chip to another, and we have an idea for how to make them do 90-degree turns. We already know how to use excitons to store, transport and manipulate quantum information. And larger areas of the materials we use to hold the excitons are becoming available now. Altogether, this makes building a much larger-scale, integrated exciton circuit possible, a new and revolutionary system for all kinds of applications.” Ruoming Peng, Adina Ripin, Yusen Ye, Jiayi Zhu, Changming Wu, Seokhyeong Lee, Huan Li, Takashi Taniguchi, Kenji Watanabe, Ting Cao, Xiaodong Xu and Mo Li are authors of “Long-range transport of 2D excitons with acoustic waves,” the research paper described in this article. Learn more at the Mo Li Group website, or contact Mo Li for more information. [post_title] => UW research team uses sound waves to move ‘excitons’ further than ever before, leading toward faster and more energy efficient electronics and optical devices [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => mo-li-excitons [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2022-05-12 11:09:05 [post_modified_gmt] => 2022-05-12 18:09:05 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=26727 [menu_order] => 3 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 26556 [post_author] => 27 [post_date] => 2022-05-05 09:33:04 [post_date_gmt] => 2022-05-05 16:33:04 [post_content] => By Wayne Gillam | UW ECE News [caption id="attachment_26559" align="alignright" width="600"]Headshot of Boon and Chieko Chaya The Chaya Family Endowed Scholarship was recently established through the generosity of UW ECE graduate Boon Chaya (BSEE ‘78, left) and his wife, Chieko (right). The scholarship will recognize and support outstanding undergraduates from low-income and underprivileged backgrounds. Photo provided by the Chaya family.[/caption] Beginning this spring, a new scholarship at UW ECE will recognize and support outstanding undergraduates from low-income and underprivileged backgrounds. The Chaya Family Endowed Scholarship, which was recently established through the generosity of UW ECE graduate Boon Chaya (BSEE ‘78) and his wife, Chieko, aims to provide these students with recognition and financial support. Recipients will be chosen by a scholarship committee appointed by the Department chair. The scholarship will cover necessities for students such as tuition and books, and it will provide important recognition of their hard work and perseverance. Past need-based scholarship recipients at UW ECE have noted that the financial award they received enabled them to have more time to do schoolwork and pursue extracurricular activities such as internships. Oftentimes, these internships lead to lucrative job offers. And with a hard-earned ECE degree in-hand (known in some industry circles as ‘the golden ticket’) students will have many opportunities to significantly improve their economic outlook as they progress in their careers. Other past UW ECE scholarship recipients have stated that they experienced a tremendous boost of confidence knowing someone believed in them by providing a scholarship. “My UW EE degree gave me a very strong foundation in problem solving that shaped my career success,” Boon said. “It was important to Chieko and I and our family that we give back. This scholarship is about helping to ease the stress of financial burden on students from underserved communities. With this support, we are sending a message of congratulations for getting into an academically rigorous department and to keep up the hard work in tough times.”

A family dedicated to giving back to others

[caption id="attachment_26562" align="alignleft" width="550"]Left: A young Boon Chaya in UW EE graduation cap and gown, standing outside UW EE building. Right, a young Boon and Chieko Chaya sitting outside the Whitehouse At left, Boon on graduation day at UW EE in 1978. Right, Boon and Chieko at Washington D.C. in 1981. It was during this time that Boon and Chieko co-founded Boma, their family-owned, socially and environmentally responsible jewelry manufacturing company. Photos provided by the Chaya family.[/caption] As an undergraduate, Boon’s concentration was in power systems. So, after his graduation in 1978, he went to work for a company in Alaska, calibrating and synchronizing electric power generators. For this work, Boon noted that skills he learned at UW ECE in problem solving, safety and controls were especially valuable. He and Chieko had a unique vision for their future, and together in 1981, they started Boma, a family-owned, socially and environmentally responsible jewelry manufacturing company. Over the years Boma has flourished, enabling the Chayas to branch out into other industries such as hospitality and commercial real estate development. Recently, Boon and Chieko passed Boma on to their daughter, Suzanne Vetillart, who is now Boma’s CEO. Under her leadership, the company is participating in the MBA Global Consulting Project at the Foster School of Business, and Boma has recently become a Certified B Corporation. This is a designation given to companies that are leaders in the global movement for an inclusive, equitable and regenerative economy and meet high standards of verified performance, accountability and transparency. Boon splits his time between Seattle and Thailand, and he has been actively involved as a volunteer, mentor, and leader locally and internationally. In 2014, he was appointed as the UW Alumni Association Thailand Chapter president, and he served for five years. During that time, he helped to inspire the launch of UW Converge, an annual global gathering of hundreds of UW alumni, family and friends from around the world, who network and learn from each other. [caption id="attachment_26570" align="alignright" width="550"]Photo of the Chaya extended family The Chaya extended family, including Boon (center, in tuxedo) and Chieko (left of Boon). Their daughter Suzanne Vetillart (right of Boon), who is CEO of the family’s jewelry company Boma, is continuing the family’s legacy of giving back through the UW. Photo provided by the Chaya family.[/caption] When in Seattle, Boon has served as a guest speaker multiple times in the EE 498 Leadership Seminar Series. His talks have been so well-received that UW ECE students often line up afterwards to thank Boon for inspiring them. In addition, he has been a mentor to the UW Thai Student Association. Boon and Chieko both said that they hope this gift to students at UW ECE will inspire others from the international alumni community to give back. “We are so grateful to Boon, Chieko and the entire Chaya family for their generous support of our students and the Department,” UW ECE Professor and Chair Eric Klavins said. “I know that through this endowed scholarship they will have a profound impact on students for many years to come. They also serve as outstanding role models for us all, demonstrating what it means to lead by example and share success with others by giving back to the community.” [caption id="attachment_26564" align="alignright" width="1175"]Left, a crowd of celebrating UW alumni, Right, Boon Chaya receives award from UW President Ana Marie Cauce At left, Boon and UW President Ana Mari Cauce (then UW Provost) at a meeting of the UW Alumni Association Thailand Chapter in 2014. Boon served as president of this organization from 2014 to 2019. At UW Converge Taipei in 2019, Cauce awarded Boon with a certificate of appreciation (photo at right) for his years of leadership as the UWAA Thailand president. Photos provided by UW Advancement.[/caption] [post_title] => Chaya family establishes new, need-based scholarship for outstanding UW ECE undergraduates [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => chaya-family-scholarship [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2022-05-05 09:33:04 [post_modified_gmt] => 2022-05-05 16:33:04 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=26556 [menu_order] => 4 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 26364 [post_author] => 27 [post_date] => 2022-04-28 08:38:53 [post_date_gmt] => 2022-04-28 15:38:53 [post_content] => By Wayne Gillam | UW ECE News [caption id="attachment_26382" align="alignright" width="550"]Photo illustration of undergraduate students working on cutting-edge research projects Starting autumn quarter 2022, UW ECE will offer a Bachelor of Science in Electrical and Computer Engineering (BSECE). This new undergraduate degree program provides students with increased flexibility and is highly adaptable to technological advances in popular research areas such as neural engineering, sustainable energy, quantum computing, data science, photonics and nanotechnology. Photo illustration by Ryan Hoover[/caption] Starting autumn quarter 2022, the University of Washington Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering (UW ECE) will begin a four-year transition toward offering a Bachelor of Science in Electrical and Computer Engineering (BSECE) rather than a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering (BSEE). This evolution of undergraduate curriculum and degree offerings is aimed at better reflecting recent changes in electrical and computer engineering, as well as ongoing studies and research at UW ECE in cutting-edge areas such as neural engineering, sustainable energy, quantum computing, data science, photonics and nanotechnology. The move will also allow the Department to provide greater flexibility for students and enable it to respond more nimbly to advances in technology. “I am thrilled at the prospect of providing new academic opportunities and greater flexibility for our undergraduate students studying electrical and computer engineering,” said UW College of Engineering Dean Nancy Allbritton. “This reinvention of curriculum by UW ECE faculty, in partnership with academic and industry advisers, is stellar. They have simply done an amazing job of creating a framework for students that is aligned with the latest advances in engineering, while providing students with maximum flexibility to achieve their goals.” In 2018, UW ECE changed wording within its name from ‘electrical engineering’ to ‘electrical and computer engineering’ to better illustrate the breadth and depth of the Department and acknowledge the tight integration that exists today between computing and electrical engineering. The Department is also consistently ranked as one of the top 20 schools for electrical engineering in the country. The new BSECE degree program reflects this high caliber of education and closely aligns the undergraduate curriculum with the Department name. “Electrical engineers have been working with and building computers for years, and because of how the field has evolved, we now expect our graduates to be highly knowledgeable and proficient in computing,” said UW ECE Professor and Chair Eric Klavins. “The new BSECE degree program is part of a larger set of changes our Department has made over the last few years to ensure our students are fully prepared to achieve their goals and empower them to have the kind of positive impact on society that you’d expect from those graduating from one of the best electrical and computer engineering departments in the country.” The transition from the existing BSEE to the new BSECE degree program will occur gradually over time, beginning with direct-to-college and transfer students entering the UW College of Engineering autumn quarter 2022. Beginning autumn quarter 2024, the BSECE will be the only degree available for undergraduate admission. The final BSEE degree is expected to be awarded in 2026.

Making student-centered changes

Both the existing BSEE and the new BSECE offer students access to outstanding faculty and interdisciplinary learning environments with opportunities for in-depth study and internships in a wide array of focus areas such as biosystems, computing and networking, data science, photonics and nanotechnology, power and energy systems, robotics and controls. But a key difference between the two programs is that the BSECE will offer students flexible academic pathways through which to gain their degree, whereas the BSEE offers a more structured approach to undergraduate curriculum. Students pursuing the new BSECE degree will have the flexibility to seek broad knowledge of the field or to focus on one or more specific areas. The program also enables the Department to better meet student demand for popular courses. Enrollment can be factored into which courses are offered and when they will be available. This will allow students to have the capacity to pursue minors or even consider double degrees that might offer greater versatility in careers after graduation. “The key words I would use to describe the new BSECE are ‘flexibility, versatility and adaptability,’ said UW ECE Associate Professor and Associate Chair for Education Payman Arabshahi. “The program provides students with greater flexibility in their academic pathways, versatility for their futures after graduation, and it is highly adaptable to changes in the field and developments in new technology. We at UW ECE are fully committed to our students’ success, and this new degree program will provide outstanding support and opportunities for their future.” Learn more about this new undergraduate degree program on the BSECE webpage. [post_title] => UW ECE launches new undergraduate degree program to reflect cutting-edge research and provide greater flexibility for students [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => bsece [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2022-04-28 08:48:12 [post_modified_gmt] => 2022-04-28 15:48:12 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=26364 [menu_order] => 5 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 26307 [post_author] => 26 [post_date] => 2022-04-25 10:58:47 [post_date_gmt] => 2022-04-25 17:58:47 [post_content] => Article by Institute for Nano-engineered Systems (NanoES) staff Researchers in clean room The Institute for Nano-engineered Systems (NanoES) has awarded four seed grants to researchers at the University of Washington (UW) and Western Washington University to use nanotechnology tools to develop new, innovative technologies and devices. Awardees will receive up to $10,000 to carry out work in the UW’s Washington Nanofabrication Facility (WNF) and Molecular Analysis Facility (MAF), key nanotechnology facilities in the Northwest Nanotechnology Infrastructure, which is one of 16 sites in the NSF’s National Nanotechnology Coordinated Infrastructure (NNCI) program. “We were thrilled with the range of novel proposals that we received from researchers across the Pacific Northwest,” said NanoES director Karl Böhringer, who is a professor of electrical & computer engineering and of bioengineering at the University of Washington. “We look forward to seeing the outcome of these projects and their impact.” This seed grant program enables first-time facility users both inside and outside the UW to build and characterize prototypes, obtain preliminary results and conduct proof of concept studies.

The awardees for this cycle are:

Autonomous microfluidic devices for therapeutic monitoring of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) medications

Ayokunle Olanrewaju, Assistant Professor in Mechanical Engineering and Bioengineering, University of Washington

Abstract: 38 million people live with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) around the world and 25 million of them take daily antiretroviral (ARV) drugs to extend their length and quality of life. However, >25% of patients are at risk of treatment failure and death because of inadequate medication adherence and inter-individual differences in drug pharmacokinetics. ARVs are typically monitored using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), but this is centralized, expensive, and unavailable at the point of need (e.g. doctor’s office, patient’s home, or event setting). A rapid and user-friendly test for measuring ARVs would actionable information to prevent treatment failure and improve HIV care outcomes. We recently developed the enzymatic REverSe TRanscrIptase Chain Termination (RESTRICT) assay for measuring ARVs in the nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) class used in >90% of HIV treatment regimens. RESTRICT is rapid (<30 min) and accurate compared with LC-MS/MS but still requires 4 liquid handling steps and timed user intervention. We propose the development of an autonomous microfluidic device – with self-propelled and self-regulated encoded by microchannel surface geometry and chemistry – to automate the RESTRICT. Our RESTRICT chip will enable rapid and user-friendly therapeutic monitoring of ARVs at the point of need including in low-resource settings. We will leverage previous work by our group on the design and fabrication of capillary microfluidic devices for autonomous liquid handling using capillary trigger valves, retention burst valves, and capillary pumps. We will design new capillary microfluidic networks for enzyme activity assays to monitor DNA synthesis in the presence of NRTIs. To our knowledge this will be the first application of capillary microfluidics to enzyme activity assays and therapeutic drug monitoring. Success will require advances in the design, fabrication, and application of capillary microfluidic networks.

Fabrication of Doped Silicon Ion Traps

Sara Mouradian, Assistant Professor of Electrical & Computer Engineering, University of Washington
Abstract: Trapped ions are a leading platform for quantum information processing due to their high fidelity operation. Moreover, microfabricated traps promise scalability as multiple trapping regions can be fabricated on the same chip. However, these microfabricated traps have been plagued by electric field noise which heats up the quantized motional modes of the ions and decreases gate fidelity. There have been many studies to elucidate the exact cause of this electric field noise, and while there is still not a unified theory which explains all the data, the consensus is that the noise arises from defects in the electrode material. These electrodes are generally made from evaporated metal films which are disordered in the bulk and on the surface. Here, we propose to instead fabricate traps out of doped Silicon which can provide conductivities similar to evaporated metal while being completely crystalline. Our hypothesis is that these traps will exhibit lower electric field noise at the ion, allowing for high fidelity operations even as ions are trapped closer to the surface. There have been demonstrations of such doped Silicon traps, and indeed the measured electric field noise was comparable to the best reported in the literature. However, the noise measurement was not the focus of these studies, was not studied systematically, and was likely dominated by technical noise on the dc voltages instead of the surface induced noise. Here, we propose to fabricate traps directly from doped Silicon which will have two advantages: (1) the crystalline structure of Silicon will eliminate disorder that is thought to be the leading cause of electric field noise and (2) fabrication techniques developed for MEMS technology will allow electrode design that is unconstrained by fabrication, enabling increased trap depth and increased ion-electrode distance simultaneously.

Out-of-oven, energy efficient, rapid fabrication of high entropy oxides using RF fields

Aniruddh Vashisth, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, University of Washington

Abstract: High entropy oxides (HEOs) are a new class of materials recently discovered and synthesized in 2015. HEOs are essentially stable hybrids of different metal oxides, with material properties somewhere between the constituent oxides, or occasionally entirely new properties not present in the constituents. One unique quality of HEOs are that their chemical compositions can be adjusted, either by switching out what elements are present or adjusting the ratios of the different elements, allowing for the fine-tuning of material properties. The prospect of high entropy perovskite oxides is very promising, as traditional perovskites are commonly found in the energy and microprocessing sectors such as in solar cells, batteries, and semiconductors; high entropy perovskite oxides have the potential to further enhance the performance of these devices. Currently, the largest limitation of HEO are that their fabrication processes are very time and energy intensive. The most common HEO synthesis method involves mixing and milling constituent powders for multiple hours, followed by a multiple-hour sintering process at around 1500°C. As a result, the development and scale-up of new HEOs has been slow. One new HEO fabrication method currently being explored by our lab involves solution combustion synthesis; this method reduces the formation temperature of HEOs down in the range of 200°C, allowing for much more efficient fabrication. To initiate the combustion reaction, we use radio frequency (RF) energy efficient heating method developed by our lab that allows for out-of-oven synthesis of HEOs in a matter of seconds rather than hours. This approach has been successfully implemented for non-perovskite HEOs. With this Seed Grant, the Vashisth Research Lab hopes to characterize these HEOs and high entropy perovskites being fabricated in our lab to characterize and understand their structure resulting from our novel processing method.

Anisotropic nanomaterial heterostructures for photocatalysis

Michael Enright, Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Western Washington University

Abstract: A critical challenge in solar fuels and photocatalysis technologies is charge transfer management. Quantum dots have been used extensively in photocatalytic hydrogen evolution and other related solar-to-fuel applications. However, these systems suffer from low quantum efficiencies and turnover numbers due rapid radiative recombination on the nanosecond time scale and slow photocatalyst regeneration with reliance upon sacrificial, molecular donors. This work explores the synthesis and implementation of heterostructure nanomaterials for solar energy conversion. Development of novel type II, anisotropic heterostructure nanomaterials, such as dot-in-rods or seeded tetrapods, will enable higher efficiency photoredox reactions and unlock opportunities for visible light mediated CO2 reduction and alkyl cross-coupling. CuAlS2/ZnS is composed of biocompatible, earth-abundant elements and heterostructures of this composition exhibit a rare, staggered, type II band edge offset of nearly 1 eV at both the conduction and valence bands. Previously, Janus-type CuAlS2/ZnS nanoparticles demonstrated 20% solar conversion efficiencies for bicarbonate to formate reduction. Our work intends to develop synthetic protocols for new, elongated CuAlS2/ZnS nanorods and tetrapods with improved photoredox capabilities. Once synthesized, these nanostructures will be incorporated onto electrodes to use an applied bias to quench holes in photoexcited CuAlS2/ZnS and improve photocatalyst turnover rate. Hole quenching is the rate limiting step photoreduction and prior hole quenching efforts via electron transfer have been challenged in CdSe by rapid back electron transfer from the reduced substrate and radiative recombination that occur on similar timescales to electron transfer from an applied bias. We expect the slower rates of back electron transfer and radiative recombination in type II, anisotropic CuAlS2/ZnS heterostructures will enable more efficient hole quenching via electron transfer. This demonstration would serve as a leading study in high solar conversion efficiency photoredox systems and feature a novel photocathode to serve as a foundation for our further development of new nanomaterial catalyzed photoredox processes.

Information about future seed grant opportunities through the Northwest Nanotechnology Infrastructure can be found on the NanoES website. [post_title] => UW NanoES announces awardees of Northwest Nanotechnology Infrastructure seed grants [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => sara-mouradian-northwest-nanotechnology-infrastructure-seed-grant [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2022-04-25 10:58:47 [post_modified_gmt] => 2022-04-25 17:58:47 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=26307 [menu_order] => 6 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [_numposts:protected] => 6 [_rendered:protected] => 1 [_classes:protected] => Array ( [0] => view-block [1] => block--spotlight-robust-news ) [_finalHTML:protected] =>
https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/uw-ece-honors-and-celebrates-the-retirements-of-four-outstanding-faculty-members/
https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/2022-graduation-diane-jurgens/
Diane Jurgens from The Walt Disney Company to speak at UW ECE Graduation

Diane Jurgens from The Walt Disney Company to speak at UW ECE Graduation

UW ECE alumna Diane Jurgens (BSEE ‘85, MSEE ‘86) will speak at this year's graduation ceremony. She has over three decades of experience as an international business and technology leader and is currently Executive Vice President and Chief Information Officer at the Walt Disney Company.

https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/mo-li-excitons/
https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/chaya-family-scholarship/
https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/bsece/
https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/sara-mouradian-northwest-nanotechnology-infrastructure-seed-grant/
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But recently, that is exactly what has happened at UW ECE. Between July 2020 and the end of spring quarter this year, four distinguished professors have announced their retirement or will be retiring soon. Howard Chizeck, Bruce Darling, Yasuo Kuga and Ming-Ting Sun are all leaders in their respective fields and leave an impactful legacy of service to the Department, its students, the College of Engineering and the University at large. A live, in-person event was held at UW ECE on Thursday, May 26 to honor and celebrate Chizeck and Darling’s retirements. “We at UW ECE are deeply grateful for the many years of service Howard, Bruce, Yasuo and Ming-Ting have provided the Department, the College and the University,” UW ECE Professor and Chair Eric Klavins said. “The impact on their respective fields and on our students cannot be overstated. We will miss them greatly but wish them all the best as they move forward into this new chapter of their lives.” Read on to learn more about these professors’ exceptional careers. The overviews below by no means can capture all their many accomplishments, but the summaries provide a general sense of these outstanding faculty members and their lasting impact. [caption id="attachment_26842" align="alignleft" width="200"]Howard Chizeck headshot UW ECE Professor Emeritus Howard Chizeck[/caption]

Howard Chizeck

Professor Emeritus Howard Chizeck retired on July 1, 2020. He was with the Department for 22 years. Over his career, he served as a faculty member and department chair at two major research universities, Case Western University and the University of Washington. At the UW, he served as UW EE chair from 1998 to 2003. During his tenure as chair, the Department thrived despite difficult financial times for the University. Research activity and funding rapidly increased under Chizeck’s leadership. He also led the Department to a more student-centered approach to education, overseeing curriculum revision and improvements to student services such as advising. During his tenure, graduate student recruitment and participation in undergraduate research increased and the Department recruited an outstanding group of new faculty. As a result, UW EE moved up significantly in rankings and increased its national visibility and stature. Chizeck’s research interests include telerobotics and neural engineering. During his time at UW ECE, he was co-director of the UW BioRobotics Laboratory, adjunct professor of bioengineering at the UW and a research thrust leader at the Center for Neurotechnology. His telerobotic research included haptic navigation and control for robotic surgery and for underwater devices, as well as security of telerobotic systems. His neural engineering work involved the design and security of brain-machine interfaces and the development of assistive devices to restore hand and locomotive capabilities. Chizeck was elected as an IEEE Fellow in 1999 for his contributions to the use of control system theory in biomedical engineering, and he is now an IEEE Life Fellow. He was elected to the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering College of Fellows in 2011 for contributions to the use of control system theory in functional electrical stimulation assisted walking. From 2008 to 2012, he was a member of the Science Technology Advisory Panel of the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory. Throughout his career, Chizeck was heavily involved with several startup companies, including being a founder of ControlSoft, Inc. in Cleveland, Ohio. He was also a founder and is currently chair of the Board of Directors at Olis Robotics, which was established in 2013 as a UW spinoff. [caption id="attachment_26844" align="alignleft" width="200"]Bruce Darling headshot UW ECE Professor Bruce Darling[/caption]

Bruce Darling

Professor Bruce Darling will retire on September 15, 2022. He has been with the Department for 37 years. He served as UW EE acting chair from 2003 to 2004 and UW ECE interim chair winter quarter 2020. During his time at UW ECE, Darling has held numerous leadership roles within the Department, including serving as ABET coordinator for the BSEE program, graduate program coordinator and associate chair for education. Since joining the Department in 1985, Darling has regularly taught courses in electronic circuits and devices, analog circuit design, photodetection, semiconductor devices, microfabrication, medical instrumentation and senior project design. He has also developed instructional curriculum and laboratories for undergraduate electronics, introductory radio frequency electronics and the first hands-on microfabrication laboratory at the UW in 1995. He co-founded and directed the Center for Applied Microtechnology and the UW EE Microfabrication Laboratory, which operated from 1997 to 2020. His research has covered many different areas of integrated sensor development, including integrated circuit design; novel optoelectronic devices, electronic materials and processing techniques; and medical devices. In 2003, Darling was an electrical engineering forensic investigator on the NASA Space Shuttle Orbiter Columbia Accident Investigation Board. He has also participated in several NASA expeditions to the Atacama Desert and high Andean volcanoes of Chile and Bolivia, coordinating field communications and electrical power. Darling is a registered professional engineer in Washington state and actively consults with local industry and startups on electronic product development and new electronic device concepts. He is a co-founder and serves on the board of directors of PhysioWave, Inc. Over the past decade, Darling has also served as a faculty adviser for several student organizations and competitions, including EcoCAR, Washington Superbike, Formula SAE and the Tau Beta Pi engineering honor society. [caption id="attachment_26846" align="alignleft" width="200"]Yasuo Kuga headshot UW ECE Professor Yasuo Kuga[/caption]

Yasuo Kuga

Professor Yasuo Kuga will retire on June 15, 2022. He has been with the Department as a faculty member for 31 years. He received his B.S., M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from UW EE in 1977, 1979 and 1983, respectively. From 1983 to 1988, he was a Research Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering at the UW. From 1988 to 1991, he was an Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at The University of Michigan. Since 1991, he has been with the UW. Kuga’s research interests are millimeter-wave and microwave remote sensing of geophysical media, millimeter wave scattering from rough surfaces and random media, imaging through random media, laser light scattering, material development and characterization, antenna design, and microwave system design. He has published four book chapters, 90 journal articles and over 200 conference papers and abstracts. Kuga is a member of Commissions B and F of the International Union of Radio Science. His work in IEEE and other technical societies includes (1) Professional journal editorial activities: Associate Editor, IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing (1996–2000), Associate Editor, Radio Science (1993–1996), Co-Guest Editor, Special Issue, IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, based on IGARSS '98, and (2) Conference organization activities: IEEE IGARSS '98 Technical Co-Chair, IEEE AP/URSI 1994 and 2011 Steering Committee, Radar Conference 2017, Technical Co-Chair. Kuga has received several awards for his work including a 1989 National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator Award, being named an IEEE Fellow in 2004, a NASA Board Award for NTR no. 42391: JPL, May 2007, and he was named an IEEE Life Fellow in 2017. [caption id="attachment_26847" align="alignleft" width="200"]Ming-Ting Sun headshot UW ECE Professor Emeritus Ming-Ting Sun[/caption]

Ming-Ting Sun

Professor Emeritus Ming-Ting Sun retired on December 15, 2021. He has been with the Department for 26 years. Prior to joining the University in 1996, he was the director of video signal processing research at Bellcore. Over his career, Sun has been a chaired or visiting professor at several universities. His main research interests are video and multimedia signal processing. Sun holds 13 patents and has published close to 300 technical papers, including 17 book chapters covering video and multimedia technologies. He also co-edited a book titled, “Compressed Video over Networks” and has guest-edited 12 special issues for various journals. He served as an editor-in-chief for three technical journals: Journal for Visual Communication and Image Representation (JVCI) from 2012 to 2016, IEEE Transactions on Multimedia (TMM) from 2000 to 2001, and IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems for Video Technology (TCSVT) from 1995 to 1997. He received the TCSVT Best Paper Award in 1993 and has provided the keynote address for several international conferences. He was a Distinguished Lecturer of the Circuits and Systems Society from 2000 to 2001, and he received an IEEE CASS Golden Jubilee Medal in 2000. Sun served as a general co-chair of the IEEE International Conference on Multimedia and Expo (ICME) in 2016, was an honorary chair of the Visual Communication and Image Processing (VCIP) conference in 2015 and was a general co-chair of VCIP 2000. He also served as the chair of the Visual Signal Processing and Communications (VSPC) Technical Committee of IEEE Circuits and Systems (CAS) Society from 1993 to 1994. From 1988 to 1991, he was the chairman of the IEEE CAS Standards Committee and established the IEEE Inverse Discrete Cosine Transform Standard. He became an IEEE Fellow in 1996, and in 2020 received the honor of becoming an IEEE Life Fellow. [post_title] => UW ECE honors and celebrates the retirements of four outstanding faculty members [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => uw-ece-honors-and-celebrates-the-retirements-of-four-outstanding-faculty-members [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2022-05-27 10:08:33 [post_modified_gmt] => 2022-05-27 17:08:33 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=26833 [menu_order] => 1 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 26804 [post_author] => 27 [post_date] => 2022-05-19 09:09:08 [post_date_gmt] => 2022-05-19 16:09:08 [post_content] => By Wayne Gillam | UW ECE News [caption id="attachment_26809" align="alignright" width="550"]Diane Jurgens headshot UW ECE alumna Diane Jurgens will be guest speaker for the Department’s 2022 graduation ceremony. Jurgens has over three decades of experience as an international business and technology leader, and she is currently Executive Vice President and Chief Information Officer at the Walt Disney Company.[/caption] The University of Washington Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering is proud to announce UW ECE alumna Diane Jurgens (BSEE ‘85, MSEE ‘86), as guest speaker for the Department’s 2022 graduation ceremony. Jurgens has over three decades of experience as an international business and technology leader, and she is currently Executive Vice President and Chief Information Officer at the Walt Disney Company. The graduation ceremony will take place in the Alaska Airlines Arena at Hec Edmundson Pavilion on Wednesday, June 8, from 7 to 9 p.m. The event will include 2022, 2021 and 2020 graduating classes and will be presided over by UW ECE Professor and Chair Eric Klavins. “We are thrilled to have Diane as guest speaker for graduation this year,” Klavins said. “She has had an impressive number of achievements over her career and her leadership in technology and innovation has had significant global impact. She truly is one of our most outstanding alumni, demonstrating how a person can achieve their dreams with a degree from our Department serving as their foundation.” At Disney, Jurgens oversees the company’s global Enterprise Technology team whose purpose is to connect, empower and protect the Disney magic. Her organization includes digital transformation, user experience, core platforms, networking, and cloud computing — ensuring strategic relevance and operational effectiveness. She is also responsible for Global Information Security across the Company. Before joining Disney in October 2020, Jurgens was based in Singapore as Chief Technology Officer for BHP, a multinational mining, metals and petroleum company. There, she was responsible for the technology strategy and transformation to enable BHP’s vision to bring people and resources together to build a better world. Her leadership at BHP was recognized in 2018 by AFR Magazine, which named her as one of Australia’s top five technology influencers for turning BHP from a ‘fast follower’ into a digital leader. Over her career, Jurgens has held senior executive positions and led technology teams in 25 different countries — driving innovation on a worldwide scale. Her roles prior to BHP include 10 years in China as President and Managing Director of Shanghai OnStar Telematics and Chief Information Officer for General Motors’ International Operations. Early in her career, she held a number of executive leadership and engineering roles at Boeing. She has received numerous awards recognizing her leadership abilities, including a 2013 Magnolia Award from the Shanghai Government Office of Foreign Affairs for making a significant contribution to the city’s economy, business environment, international relations, community development and management standards. Most recently, Jurgens was named one of the top 10 women in technology in the U.S. by Technology Magazine. In addition to her long list of accomplishments, Jurgens has deep expertise in telematics, intelligent transportation systems, cybersecurity, data science, robotics, machine learning, Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT), advanced sensors and artificial intelligence. She is also an advocate for STEM education and neurodiversity programs. Those attending this year’s graduation ceremony can look forward to hearing from an exceptionally accomplished alum who has a wealth of knowledge and leadership experience to share from a global perspective. [post_title] => Diane Jurgens from The Walt Disney Company to speak at UW ECE Graduation [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => 2022-graduation-diane-jurgens [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2022-05-19 09:24:33 [post_modified_gmt] => 2022-05-19 16:24:33 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=26804 [menu_order] => 2 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 26727 [post_author] => 27 [post_date] => 2022-05-12 10:18:51 [post_date_gmt] => 2022-05-12 17:18:51 [post_content] => By Wayne Gillam | UW ECE News [caption id="attachment_26758" align="alignright" width="575"]Illustration of atomic layers that hold excitons A research team led by UW ECE Professor Mo Li has developed a method of using soundwaves to move subatomic quasiparticles known as ‘excitons’ a much greater distance than ever before possible. The team’s innovations lead the way to development of a new type of computing circuit, one that is faster and much more energy efficient, using light and quantum phenomena to store, process and transmit information. Shown above: an illustration of the 2D material (tungsten diselenide) Li and his team used to capture and move the excitons. The material layers are each only one atom thick, which for practical purposes, makes them two-dimensional. The layers are flanked by devices that generate sound waves capable of moving excitons relatively long distances. Illustration provided by Ruoming Peng[/caption] Most people have probably never heard of an ‘exciton' before. But scientists and engineers have been working with excitons for some time now, seeking ways to unlock the potential these subatomic quasiparticles have to revolutionize modern electronic circuitry and optics in commonly used devices such as solar panels and light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Excitons are considered quasiparticles because they are quantum phenomena resulting from the interaction between two particles within solid matter. An exciton is created when an electron absorbs light (in the form of a photon) and jumps to a higher energy state, leaving a ‘hole’ behind in its previous position — something akin to a tiny bubble floating in water. The negatively charged electron and the positively charged hole remain bound together by electrostatic forces, and together they form what is known as an exciton. Once the electron falls back into the hole, it emits a photon, and the exciton ceases to exist. Excitons contain internal quantum properties that can be used to store information transmitted through light. And because excitons are charge-neutral — the negatively charged electron and the positively charged hole cancel each other out — they escape energy-scattering losses from electrically-charged disorder or lattice vibration, which makes today’s electronic circuitry unpleasantly hot and drains the battery fast. These qualities make excitons promising candidates for increasing the speed and energy efficiency of computing and a wide range of electronic and optical devices. However, a big challenge for engineers is the fact that excitons are temporary, typically lasting only a few microseconds at most. So, finding ways to stabilize excitons and move them in a controlled direction beyond the short distance in which they naturally diffuse and disappear is a crucial step toward engineering energy-efficient exciton circuits capable of replacing standard circuits in modern electronics. Over the last two years, a University of Washington research team led by Mo Li, a professor in the electrical and computer engineering department and the physics department, has developed an innovative way to use sound waves to transport excitons over the distances needed to create exciton transistors, switches and transducers — the building blocks of exciton circuitry. In a recent paper published in Nature Communications, Li and his team demonstrate how they were able to extend exciton life and use sound waves to move these quasiparticles distances over 10 times further than what other researchers have been able to achieve to date. “In our innovation, we used two atomic layers of 2D materials (tungsten diselenide) stacked on top of each other. When light is applied and excitons form, the electrons separate out into one layer and the holes they leave behind go into the other,” Li explained. “The electrons and the holes are still close enough to each other to remain bonded together, and because they are on separate layers, it’s much harder for them to recombine. This makes the excitons live much, much longer — more than 10 times longer than they would on a single layer. From there, we used acoustic waves to move the excitons further than has ever been achieved before.”

Laying the groundwork for exciton circuits

[caption id="attachment_26737" align="alignright" width="525"]Mo Li headshot UW ECE Professor Mo Li, who is also a professor in the physics department, led the UW team that made this research advance. Li is also a member of the steering committee for the Quantum X Initiative at the UW and a member of the Institute for Nano-Engineered Systems (NanoES).[/caption] In their experiments, the team was able to transport excitons far beyond the diffusion limit — the distance from its origin at which an exciton naturally recombines — moving them 20 microns in a controlled direction at 100 K (-280° F). They also demonstrated success transporting excitons well beyond the diffusion limit at room temperature. A distance of 20 microns may not seem very far, but it is over 10 times further than the exciton’s natural diffusion limit, which is far enough to demonstrate the viability of exciton circuitry. And until now, most research teams have only been able to move excitons a few microns in similar 2D materials. “The reason we demonstrated moving the excitons 20 microns is because our material is 20 microns wide,” said Ruoming Peng, the paper’s lead author. “If the material were larger, say 100 microns (a typical size for sophisticated electronic circuitry), we could move them that far using stronger sound waves. We are only limited by the size of the device.” Excitons are unresponsive to an electrical charge because they are charge-neutral, but when struck by sound waves, these quasiparticles will move in the direction the waves travel. A key innovation by the team was orienting sound waves perpendicular to the plane of the atomic layers that contained the excitons. “Our main innovation here was to generate a primarily vertical acoustic field but not a horizontal field,” Peng explained. “We used that vertical field, which oscillates and moves, to push the excitons away, along the direction in which the sound wave propagates. You could say that the excitons were ‘surfing’ the sound wave! Prior to this innovation, excitons could not survive and would dissociate with the surface acoustic wave. Our group was able to suppress the detrimental effect of the acoustic wave but keep the beneficial effect.”

A bright future for excitons

This work shows that sound waves are an effective, contact-free means to shuttle excitons over relatively long distances in a controlled direction. And that means exciton circuits are a real possibility for the future, leading to faster and more energy efficient computing and optical devices such as LEDs, better sensing and detection devices, and improved speed and efficiency within electronics we use every day. Next steps for Li’s research team include building on their findings by constructing a large-scale exciton circuit prototype, one that can store, manipulate and transmit data through light and the quantum information inherent to these quasiparticles. “This advance is very exciting. It shows that we can build a much larger exciton circuit than before, and possibly at room temperature,” Li said. “We can move excitons from one end of a computer chip to another, and we have an idea for how to make them do 90-degree turns. We already know how to use excitons to store, transport and manipulate quantum information. And larger areas of the materials we use to hold the excitons are becoming available now. Altogether, this makes building a much larger-scale, integrated exciton circuit possible, a new and revolutionary system for all kinds of applications.” Ruoming Peng, Adina Ripin, Yusen Ye, Jiayi Zhu, Changming Wu, Seokhyeong Lee, Huan Li, Takashi Taniguchi, Kenji Watanabe, Ting Cao, Xiaodong Xu and Mo Li are authors of “Long-range transport of 2D excitons with acoustic waves,” the research paper described in this article. Learn more at the Mo Li Group website, or contact Mo Li for more information. [post_title] => UW research team uses sound waves to move ‘excitons’ further than ever before, leading toward faster and more energy efficient electronics and optical devices [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => mo-li-excitons [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2022-05-12 11:09:05 [post_modified_gmt] => 2022-05-12 18:09:05 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=26727 [menu_order] => 3 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 26556 [post_author] => 27 [post_date] => 2022-05-05 09:33:04 [post_date_gmt] => 2022-05-05 16:33:04 [post_content] => By Wayne Gillam | UW ECE News [caption id="attachment_26559" align="alignright" width="600"]Headshot of Boon and Chieko Chaya The Chaya Family Endowed Scholarship was recently established through the generosity of UW ECE graduate Boon Chaya (BSEE ‘78, left) and his wife, Chieko (right). The scholarship will recognize and support outstanding undergraduates from low-income and underprivileged backgrounds. Photo provided by the Chaya family.[/caption] Beginning this spring, a new scholarship at UW ECE will recognize and support outstanding undergraduates from low-income and underprivileged backgrounds. The Chaya Family Endowed Scholarship, which was recently established through the generosity of UW ECE graduate Boon Chaya (BSEE ‘78) and his wife, Chieko, aims to provide these students with recognition and financial support. Recipients will be chosen by a scholarship committee appointed by the Department chair. The scholarship will cover necessities for students such as tuition and books, and it will provide important recognition of their hard work and perseverance. Past need-based scholarship recipients at UW ECE have noted that the financial award they received enabled them to have more time to do schoolwork and pursue extracurricular activities such as internships. Oftentimes, these internships lead to lucrative job offers. And with a hard-earned ECE degree in-hand (known in some industry circles as ‘the golden ticket’) students will have many opportunities to significantly improve their economic outlook as they progress in their careers. Other past UW ECE scholarship recipients have stated that they experienced a tremendous boost of confidence knowing someone believed in them by providing a scholarship. “My UW EE degree gave me a very strong foundation in problem solving that shaped my career success,” Boon said. “It was important to Chieko and I and our family that we give back. This scholarship is about helping to ease the stress of financial burden on students from underserved communities. With this support, we are sending a message of congratulations for getting into an academically rigorous department and to keep up the hard work in tough times.”

A family dedicated to giving back to others

[caption id="attachment_26562" align="alignleft" width="550"]Left: A young Boon Chaya in UW EE graduation cap and gown, standing outside UW EE building. Right, a young Boon and Chieko Chaya sitting outside the Whitehouse At left, Boon on graduation day at UW EE in 1978. Right, Boon and Chieko at Washington D.C. in 1981. It was during this time that Boon and Chieko co-founded Boma, their family-owned, socially and environmentally responsible jewelry manufacturing company. Photos provided by the Chaya family.[/caption] As an undergraduate, Boon’s concentration was in power systems. So, after his graduation in 1978, he went to work for a company in Alaska, calibrating and synchronizing electric power generators. For this work, Boon noted that skills he learned at UW ECE in problem solving, safety and controls were especially valuable. He and Chieko had a unique vision for their future, and together in 1981, they started Boma, a family-owned, socially and environmentally responsible jewelry manufacturing company. Over the years Boma has flourished, enabling the Chayas to branch out into other industries such as hospitality and commercial real estate development. Recently, Boon and Chieko passed Boma on to their daughter, Suzanne Vetillart, who is now Boma’s CEO. Under her leadership, the company is participating in the MBA Global Consulting Project at the Foster School of Business, and Boma has recently become a Certified B Corporation. This is a designation given to companies that are leaders in the global movement for an inclusive, equitable and regenerative economy and meet high standards of verified performance, accountability and transparency. Boon splits his time between Seattle and Thailand, and he has been actively involved as a volunteer, mentor, and leader locally and internationally. In 2014, he was appointed as the UW Alumni Association Thailand Chapter president, and he served for five years. During that time, he helped to inspire the launch of UW Converge, an annual global gathering of hundreds of UW alumni, family and friends from around the world, who network and learn from each other. [caption id="attachment_26570" align="alignright" width="550"]Photo of the Chaya extended family The Chaya extended family, including Boon (center, in tuxedo) and Chieko (left of Boon). Their daughter Suzanne Vetillart (right of Boon), who is CEO of the family’s jewelry company Boma, is continuing the family’s legacy of giving back through the UW. Photo provided by the Chaya family.[/caption] When in Seattle, Boon has served as a guest speaker multiple times in the EE 498 Leadership Seminar Series. His talks have been so well-received that UW ECE students often line up afterwards to thank Boon for inspiring them. In addition, he has been a mentor to the UW Thai Student Association. Boon and Chieko both said that they hope this gift to students at UW ECE will inspire others from the international alumni community to give back. “We are so grateful to Boon, Chieko and the entire Chaya family for their generous support of our students and the Department,” UW ECE Professor and Chair Eric Klavins said. “I know that through this endowed scholarship they will have a profound impact on students for many years to come. They also serve as outstanding role models for us all, demonstrating what it means to lead by example and share success with others by giving back to the community.” [caption id="attachment_26564" align="alignright" width="1175"]Left, a crowd of celebrating UW alumni, Right, Boon Chaya receives award from UW President Ana Marie Cauce At left, Boon and UW President Ana Mari Cauce (then UW Provost) at a meeting of the UW Alumni Association Thailand Chapter in 2014. Boon served as president of this organization from 2014 to 2019. At UW Converge Taipei in 2019, Cauce awarded Boon with a certificate of appreciation (photo at right) for his years of leadership as the UWAA Thailand president. Photos provided by UW Advancement.[/caption] [post_title] => Chaya family establishes new, need-based scholarship for outstanding UW ECE undergraduates [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => chaya-family-scholarship [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2022-05-05 09:33:04 [post_modified_gmt] => 2022-05-05 16:33:04 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=26556 [menu_order] => 4 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 26364 [post_author] => 27 [post_date] => 2022-04-28 08:38:53 [post_date_gmt] => 2022-04-28 15:38:53 [post_content] => By Wayne Gillam | UW ECE News [caption id="attachment_26382" align="alignright" width="550"]Photo illustration of undergraduate students working on cutting-edge research projects Starting autumn quarter 2022, UW ECE will offer a Bachelor of Science in Electrical and Computer Engineering (BSECE). This new undergraduate degree program provides students with increased flexibility and is highly adaptable to technological advances in popular research areas such as neural engineering, sustainable energy, quantum computing, data science, photonics and nanotechnology. Photo illustration by Ryan Hoover[/caption] Starting autumn quarter 2022, the University of Washington Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering (UW ECE) will begin a four-year transition toward offering a Bachelor of Science in Electrical and Computer Engineering (BSECE) rather than a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering (BSEE). This evolution of undergraduate curriculum and degree offerings is aimed at better reflecting recent changes in electrical and computer engineering, as well as ongoing studies and research at UW ECE in cutting-edge areas such as neural engineering, sustainable energy, quantum computing, data science, photonics and nanotechnology. The move will also allow the Department to provide greater flexibility for students and enable it to respond more nimbly to advances in technology. “I am thrilled at the prospect of providing new academic opportunities and greater flexibility for our undergraduate students studying electrical and computer engineering,” said UW College of Engineering Dean Nancy Allbritton. “This reinvention of curriculum by UW ECE faculty, in partnership with academic and industry advisers, is stellar. They have simply done an amazing job of creating a framework for students that is aligned with the latest advances in engineering, while providing students with maximum flexibility to achieve their goals.” In 2018, UW ECE changed wording within its name from ‘electrical engineering’ to ‘electrical and computer engineering’ to better illustrate the breadth and depth of the Department and acknowledge the tight integration that exists today between computing and electrical engineering. The Department is also consistently ranked as one of the top 20 schools for electrical engineering in the country. The new BSECE degree program reflects this high caliber of education and closely aligns the undergraduate curriculum with the Department name. “Electrical engineers have been working with and building computers for years, and because of how the field has evolved, we now expect our graduates to be highly knowledgeable and proficient in computing,” said UW ECE Professor and Chair Eric Klavins. “The new BSECE degree program is part of a larger set of changes our Department has made over the last few years to ensure our students are fully prepared to achieve their goals and empower them to have the kind of positive impact on society that you’d expect from those graduating from one of the best electrical and computer engineering departments in the country.” The transition from the existing BSEE to the new BSECE degree program will occur gradually over time, beginning with direct-to-college and transfer students entering the UW College of Engineering autumn quarter 2022. Beginning autumn quarter 2024, the BSECE will be the only degree available for undergraduate admission. The final BSEE degree is expected to be awarded in 2026.

Making student-centered changes

Both the existing BSEE and the new BSECE offer students access to outstanding faculty and interdisciplinary learning environments with opportunities for in-depth study and internships in a wide array of focus areas such as biosystems, computing and networking, data science, photonics and nanotechnology, power and energy systems, robotics and controls. But a key difference between the two programs is that the BSECE will offer students flexible academic pathways through which to gain their degree, whereas the BSEE offers a more structured approach to undergraduate curriculum. Students pursuing the new BSECE degree will have the flexibility to seek broad knowledge of the field or to focus on one or more specific areas. The program also enables the Department to better meet student demand for popular courses. Enrollment can be factored into which courses are offered and when they will be available. This will allow students to have the capacity to pursue minors or even consider double degrees that might offer greater versatility in careers after graduation. “The key words I would use to describe the new BSECE are ‘flexibility, versatility and adaptability,’ said UW ECE Associate Professor and Associate Chair for Education Payman Arabshahi. “The program provides students with greater flexibility in their academic pathways, versatility for their futures after graduation, and it is highly adaptable to changes in the field and developments in new technology. We at UW ECE are fully committed to our students’ success, and this new degree program will provide outstanding support and opportunities for their future.” Learn more about this new undergraduate degree program on the BSECE webpage. [post_title] => UW ECE launches new undergraduate degree program to reflect cutting-edge research and provide greater flexibility for students [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => bsece [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2022-04-28 08:48:12 [post_modified_gmt] => 2022-04-28 15:48:12 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=26364 [menu_order] => 5 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 26307 [post_author] => 26 [post_date] => 2022-04-25 10:58:47 [post_date_gmt] => 2022-04-25 17:58:47 [post_content] => Article by Institute for Nano-engineered Systems (NanoES) staff Researchers in clean room The Institute for Nano-engineered Systems (NanoES) has awarded four seed grants to researchers at the University of Washington (UW) and Western Washington University to use nanotechnology tools to develop new, innovative technologies and devices. Awardees will receive up to $10,000 to carry out work in the UW’s Washington Nanofabrication Facility (WNF) and Molecular Analysis Facility (MAF), key nanotechnology facilities in the Northwest Nanotechnology Infrastructure, which is one of 16 sites in the NSF’s National Nanotechnology Coordinated Infrastructure (NNCI) program. “We were thrilled with the range of novel proposals that we received from researchers across the Pacific Northwest,” said NanoES director Karl Böhringer, who is a professor of electrical & computer engineering and of bioengineering at the University of Washington. “We look forward to seeing the outcome of these projects and their impact.” This seed grant program enables first-time facility users both inside and outside the UW to build and characterize prototypes, obtain preliminary results and conduct proof of concept studies.

The awardees for this cycle are:

Autonomous microfluidic devices for therapeutic monitoring of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) medications

Ayokunle Olanrewaju, Assistant Professor in Mechanical Engineering and Bioengineering, University of Washington

Abstract: 38 million people live with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) around the world and 25 million of them take daily antiretroviral (ARV) drugs to extend their length and quality of life. However, >25% of patients are at risk of treatment failure and death because of inadequate medication adherence and inter-individual differences in drug pharmacokinetics. ARVs are typically monitored using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), but this is centralized, expensive, and unavailable at the point of need (e.g. doctor’s office, patient’s home, or event setting). A rapid and user-friendly test for measuring ARVs would actionable information to prevent treatment failure and improve HIV care outcomes. We recently developed the enzymatic REverSe TRanscrIptase Chain Termination (RESTRICT) assay for measuring ARVs in the nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) class used in >90% of HIV treatment regimens. RESTRICT is rapid (<30 min) and accurate compared with LC-MS/MS but still requires 4 liquid handling steps and timed user intervention. We propose the development of an autonomous microfluidic device – with self-propelled and self-regulated encoded by microchannel surface geometry and chemistry – to automate the RESTRICT. Our RESTRICT chip will enable rapid and user-friendly therapeutic monitoring of ARVs at the point of need including in low-resource settings. We will leverage previous work by our group on the design and fabrication of capillary microfluidic devices for autonomous liquid handling using capillary trigger valves, retention burst valves, and capillary pumps. We will design new capillary microfluidic networks for enzyme activity assays to monitor DNA synthesis in the presence of NRTIs. To our knowledge this will be the first application of capillary microfluidics to enzyme activity assays and therapeutic drug monitoring. Success will require advances in the design, fabrication, and application of capillary microfluidic networks.

Fabrication of Doped Silicon Ion Traps

Sara Mouradian, Assistant Professor of Electrical & Computer Engineering, University of Washington
Abstract: Trapped ions are a leading platform for quantum information processing due to their high fidelity operation. Moreover, microfabricated traps promise scalability as multiple trapping regions can be fabricated on the same chip. However, these microfabricated traps have been plagued by electric field noise which heats up the quantized motional modes of the ions and decreases gate fidelity. There have been many studies to elucidate the exact cause of this electric field noise, and while there is still not a unified theory which explains all the data, the consensus is that the noise arises from defects in the electrode material. These electrodes are generally made from evaporated metal films which are disordered in the bulk and on the surface. Here, we propose to instead fabricate traps out of doped Silicon which can provide conductivities similar to evaporated metal while being completely crystalline. Our hypothesis is that these traps will exhibit lower electric field noise at the ion, allowing for high fidelity operations even as ions are trapped closer to the surface. There have been demonstrations of such doped Silicon traps, and indeed the measured electric field noise was comparable to the best reported in the literature. However, the noise measurement was not the focus of these studies, was not studied systematically, and was likely dominated by technical noise on the dc voltages instead of the surface induced noise. Here, we propose to fabricate traps directly from doped Silicon which will have two advantages: (1) the crystalline structure of Silicon will eliminate disorder that is thought to be the leading cause of electric field noise and (2) fabrication techniques developed for MEMS technology will allow electrode design that is unconstrained by fabrication, enabling increased trap depth and increased ion-electrode distance simultaneously.

Out-of-oven, energy efficient, rapid fabrication of high entropy oxides using RF fields

Aniruddh Vashisth, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, University of Washington

Abstract: High entropy oxides (HEOs) are a new class of materials recently discovered and synthesized in 2015. HEOs are essentially stable hybrids of different metal oxides, with material properties somewhere between the constituent oxides, or occasionally entirely new properties not present in the constituents. One unique quality of HEOs are that their chemical compositions can be adjusted, either by switching out what elements are present or adjusting the ratios of the different elements, allowing for the fine-tuning of material properties. The prospect of high entropy perovskite oxides is very promising, as traditional perovskites are commonly found in the energy and microprocessing sectors such as in solar cells, batteries, and semiconductors; high entropy perovskite oxides have the potential to further enhance the performance of these devices. Currently, the largest limitation of HEO are that their fabrication processes are very time and energy intensive. The most common HEO synthesis method involves mixing and milling constituent powders for multiple hours, followed by a multiple-hour sintering process at around 1500°C. As a result, the development and scale-up of new HEOs has been slow. One new HEO fabrication method currently being explored by our lab involves solution combustion synthesis; this method reduces the formation temperature of HEOs down in the range of 200°C, allowing for much more efficient fabrication. To initiate the combustion reaction, we use radio frequency (RF) energy efficient heating method developed by our lab that allows for out-of-oven synthesis of HEOs in a matter of seconds rather than hours. This approach has been successfully implemented for non-perovskite HEOs. With this Seed Grant, the Vashisth Research Lab hopes to characterize these HEOs and high entropy perovskites being fabricated in our lab to characterize and understand their structure resulting from our novel processing method.

Anisotropic nanomaterial heterostructures for photocatalysis

Michael Enright, Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Western Washington University

Abstract: A critical challenge in solar fuels and photocatalysis technologies is charge transfer management. Quantum dots have been used extensively in photocatalytic hydrogen evolution and other related solar-to-fuel applications. However, these systems suffer from low quantum efficiencies and turnover numbers due rapid radiative recombination on the nanosecond time scale and slow photocatalyst regeneration with reliance upon sacrificial, molecular donors. This work explores the synthesis and implementation of heterostructure nanomaterials for solar energy conversion. Development of novel type II, anisotropic heterostructure nanomaterials, such as dot-in-rods or seeded tetrapods, will enable higher efficiency photoredox reactions and unlock opportunities for visible light mediated CO2 reduction and alkyl cross-coupling. CuAlS2/ZnS is composed of biocompatible, earth-abundant elements and heterostructures of this composition exhibit a rare, staggered, type II band edge offset of nearly 1 eV at both the conduction and valence bands. Previously, Janus-type CuAlS2/ZnS nanoparticles demonstrated 20% solar conversion efficiencies for bicarbonate to formate reduction. Our work intends to develop synthetic protocols for new, elongated CuAlS2/ZnS nanorods and tetrapods with improved photoredox capabilities. Once synthesized, these nanostructures will be incorporated onto electrodes to use an applied bias to quench holes in photoexcited CuAlS2/ZnS and improve photocatalyst turnover rate. Hole quenching is the rate limiting step photoreduction and prior hole quenching efforts via electron transfer have been challenged in CdSe by rapid back electron transfer from the reduced substrate and radiative recombination that occur on similar timescales to electron transfer from an applied bias. We expect the slower rates of back electron transfer and radiative recombination in type II, anisotropic CuAlS2/ZnS heterostructures will enable more efficient hole quenching via electron transfer. This demonstration would serve as a leading study in high solar conversion efficiency photoredox systems and feature a novel photocathode to serve as a foundation for our further development of new nanomaterial catalyzed photoredox processes.

Information about future seed grant opportunities through the Northwest Nanotechnology Infrastructure can be found on the NanoES website. [post_title] => UW NanoES announces awardees of Northwest Nanotechnology Infrastructure seed grants [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => sara-mouradian-northwest-nanotechnology-infrastructure-seed-grant [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2022-04-25 10:58:47 [post_modified_gmt] => 2022-04-25 17:58:47 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=26307 [menu_order] => 6 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 6 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 26833 [post_author] => 27 [post_date] => 2022-05-27 10:08:33 [post_date_gmt] => 2022-05-27 17:08:33 [post_content] => By Wayne Gillam | UW ECE News [caption id="attachment_26857" align="alignright" width="575"]Howard Chizeck, Bruce Darling, Yasuo Kuga, Ming-Ting Sun headshots UW ECE Professors Howard Chizeck, Bruce Darling, Yasuo Kuga and Ming-Ting Sun (left to right) are all leaders in their respective fields and leave an impactful legacy of service to the Department, its students, the College of Engineering and the University at large.[/caption] It is not often that an exceptional faculty member with decades of service retires from the Department, and it is even less common for several faculty members to retire within a relatively short period of time. But recently, that is exactly what has happened at UW ECE. Between July 2020 and the end of spring quarter this year, four distinguished professors have announced their retirement or will be retiring soon. Howard Chizeck, Bruce Darling, Yasuo Kuga and Ming-Ting Sun are all leaders in their respective fields and leave an impactful legacy of service to the Department, its students, the College of Engineering and the University at large. A live, in-person event was held at UW ECE on Thursday, May 26 to honor and celebrate Chizeck and Darling’s retirements. “We at UW ECE are deeply grateful for the many years of service Howard, Bruce, Yasuo and Ming-Ting have provided the Department, the College and the University,” UW ECE Professor and Chair Eric Klavins said. “The impact on their respective fields and on our students cannot be overstated. We will miss them greatly but wish them all the best as they move forward into this new chapter of their lives.” Read on to learn more about these professors’ exceptional careers. The overviews below by no means can capture all their many accomplishments, but the summaries provide a general sense of these outstanding faculty members and their lasting impact. [caption id="attachment_26842" align="alignleft" width="200"]Howard Chizeck headshot UW ECE Professor Emeritus Howard Chizeck[/caption]

Howard Chizeck

Professor Emeritus Howard Chizeck retired on July 1, 2020. He was with the Department for 22 years. Over his career, he served as a faculty member and department chair at two major research universities, Case Western University and the University of Washington. At the UW, he served as UW EE chair from 1998 to 2003. During his tenure as chair, the Department thrived despite difficult financial times for the University. Research activity and funding rapidly increased under Chizeck’s leadership. He also led the Department to a more student-centered approach to education, overseeing curriculum revision and improvements to student services such as advising. During his tenure, graduate student recruitment and participation in undergraduate research increased and the Department recruited an outstanding group of new faculty. As a result, UW EE moved up significantly in rankings and increased its national visibility and stature. Chizeck’s research interests include telerobotics and neural engineering. During his time at UW ECE, he was co-director of the UW BioRobotics Laboratory, adjunct professor of bioengineering at the UW and a research thrust leader at the Center for Neurotechnology. His telerobotic research included haptic navigation and control for robotic surgery and for underwater devices, as well as security of telerobotic systems. His neural engineering work involved the design and security of brain-machine interfaces and the development of assistive devices to restore hand and locomotive capabilities. Chizeck was elected as an IEEE Fellow in 1999 for his contributions to the use of control system theory in biomedical engineering, and he is now an IEEE Life Fellow. He was elected to the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering College of Fellows in 2011 for contributions to the use of control system theory in functional electrical stimulation assisted walking. From 2008 to 2012, he was a member of the Science Technology Advisory Panel of the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory. Throughout his career, Chizeck was heavily involved with several startup companies, including being a founder of ControlSoft, Inc. in Cleveland, Ohio. He was also a founder and is currently chair of the Board of Directors at Olis Robotics, which was established in 2013 as a UW spinoff. [caption id="attachment_26844" align="alignleft" width="200"]Bruce Darling headshot UW ECE Professor Bruce Darling[/caption]

Bruce Darling

Professor Bruce Darling will retire on September 15, 2022. He has been with the Department for 37 years. He served as UW EE acting chair from 2003 to 2004 and UW ECE interim chair winter quarter 2020. During his time at UW ECE, Darling has held numerous leadership roles within the Department, including serving as ABET coordinator for the BSEE program, graduate program coordinator and associate chair for education. Since joining the Department in 1985, Darling has regularly taught courses in electronic circuits and devices, analog circuit design, photodetection, semiconductor devices, microfabrication, medical instrumentation and senior project design. He has also developed instructional curriculum and laboratories for undergraduate electronics, introductory radio frequency electronics and the first hands-on microfabrication laboratory at the UW in 1995. He co-founded and directed the Center for Applied Microtechnology and the UW EE Microfabrication Laboratory, which operated from 1997 to 2020. His research has covered many different areas of integrated sensor development, including integrated circuit design; novel optoelectronic devices, electronic materials and processing techniques; and medical devices. In 2003, Darling was an electrical engineering forensic investigator on the NASA Space Shuttle Orbiter Columbia Accident Investigation Board. He has also participated in several NASA expeditions to the Atacama Desert and high Andean volcanoes of Chile and Bolivia, coordinating field communications and electrical power. Darling is a registered professional engineer in Washington state and actively consults with local industry and startups on electronic product development and new electronic device concepts. He is a co-founder and serves on the board of directors of PhysioWave, Inc. Over the past decade, Darling has also served as a faculty adviser for several student organizations and competitions, including EcoCAR, Washington Superbike, Formula SAE and the Tau Beta Pi engineering honor society. [caption id="attachment_26846" align="alignleft" width="200"]Yasuo Kuga headshot UW ECE Professor Yasuo Kuga[/caption]

Yasuo Kuga

Professor Yasuo Kuga will retire on June 15, 2022. He has been with the Department as a faculty member for 31 years. He received his B.S., M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from UW EE in 1977, 1979 and 1983, respectively. From 1983 to 1988, he was a Research Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering at the UW. From 1988 to 1991, he was an Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at The University of Michigan. Since 1991, he has been with the UW. Kuga’s research interests are millimeter-wave and microwave remote sensing of geophysical media, millimeter wave scattering from rough surfaces and random media, imaging through random media, laser light scattering, material development and characterization, antenna design, and microwave system design. He has published four book chapters, 90 journal articles and over 200 conference papers and abstracts. Kuga is a member of Commissions B and F of the International Union of Radio Science. His work in IEEE and other technical societies includes (1) Professional journal editorial activities: Associate Editor, IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing (1996–2000), Associate Editor, Radio Science (1993–1996), Co-Guest Editor, Special Issue, IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, based on IGARSS '98, and (2) Conference organization activities: IEEE IGARSS '98 Technical Co-Chair, IEEE AP/URSI 1994 and 2011 Steering Committee, Radar Conference 2017, Technical Co-Chair. Kuga has received several awards for his work including a 1989 National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator Award, being named an IEEE Fellow in 2004, a NASA Board Award for NTR no. 42391: JPL, May 2007, and he was named an IEEE Life Fellow in 2017. [caption id="attachment_26847" align="alignleft" width="200"]Ming-Ting Sun headshot UW ECE Professor Emeritus Ming-Ting Sun[/caption]

Ming-Ting Sun

Professor Emeritus Ming-Ting Sun retired on December 15, 2021. He has been with the Department for 26 years. Prior to joining the University in 1996, he was the director of video signal processing research at Bellcore. Over his career, Sun has been a chaired or visiting professor at several universities. His main research interests are video and multimedia signal processing. Sun holds 13 patents and has published close to 300 technical papers, including 17 book chapters covering video and multimedia technologies. He also co-edited a book titled, “Compressed Video over Networks” and has guest-edited 12 special issues for various journals. He served as an editor-in-chief for three technical journals: Journal for Visual Communication and Image Representation (JVCI) from 2012 to 2016, IEEE Transactions on Multimedia (TMM) from 2000 to 2001, and IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems for Video Technology (TCSVT) from 1995 to 1997. He received the TCSVT Best Paper Award in 1993 and has provided the keynote address for several international conferences. He was a Distinguished Lecturer of the Circuits and Systems Society from 2000 to 2001, and he received an IEEE CASS Golden Jubilee Medal in 2000. Sun served as a general co-chair of the IEEE International Conference on Multimedia and Expo (ICME) in 2016, was an honorary chair of the Visual Communication and Image Processing (VCIP) conference in 2015 and was a general co-chair of VCIP 2000. He also served as the chair of the Visual Signal Processing and Communications (VSPC) Technical Committee of IEEE Circuits and Systems (CAS) Society from 1993 to 1994. From 1988 to 1991, he was the chairman of the IEEE CAS Standards Committee and established the IEEE Inverse Discrete Cosine Transform Standard. He became an IEEE Fellow in 1996, and in 2020 received the honor of becoming an IEEE Life Fellow. [post_title] => UW ECE honors and celebrates the retirements of four outstanding faculty members [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => uw-ece-honors-and-celebrates-the-retirements-of-four-outstanding-faculty-members [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2022-05-27 10:08:33 [post_modified_gmt] => 2022-05-27 17:08:33 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=26833 [menu_order] => 1 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 798 [max_num_pages] => 133 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => 1 [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => 1 [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => c64914061c8ecf9b16abe746203f6ad7 [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => 1 [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed ) [compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ) ) )
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