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Blake Hannaford leads UW robotics team

Team hosted by UW ECE competes in 2019 RoboMaster competition

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Blake Hannaford leads UW robotics team Banner

Two ECE faculty named as latest members of WSAS

Washington State Academy of Sciences named Mari Ostendorf and Li Deng as two of its newest members

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Two ECE faculty named as latest members of WSAS Banner

Remembering Steve Graham

ECE is mourning the loss of our friend and colleague

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Remembering Steve Graham Banner

ECE affiliate professor to receive 2019 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers

Nominated by the U.S. Department of Energy, Kevin Schneider was chosen for the award based on his exceptional promise in science and technology

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ECE affiliate professor to receive 2019 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers Banner

ECE graduates receive tenure-track faculty appointments

Bolun Xu and Edward Wang are on the pathway to prestigious academic careers

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ECE graduates receive tenure-track faculty appointments Banner

ECE team, led by Professor Jenq-Neng Hwang, wins competition in AI challenges

The group used artificial intelligence to help improve transportation systems

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ECE team, led by Professor Jenq-Neng Hwang, wins competition in AI challenges Banner

News + Events

https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/blake-hannaford-leads-uw-robotics-team/
https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/two-ece-faculty-named-as-latest-members-of-wsas/
https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/remembering-steve-graham/
https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/ece-affiliate-professor-to-receive-2019-presidential-early-career-award-for-scientists-and-engineers/
https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/ece-graduates-receive-tenure-track-faculty-appointments/
https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/ece-team-wins-competition-in-ai-challenges/
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                    [post_date] => 2019-08-14 15:02:48
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                    [post_content] => "RoboMaster, an annual robotics competition for aspiring young engineers and university students, concluded its 2019 competition in Bao’an Stadium in Shenzhen, China. The winning team from T-DT Northeastern University took home the gold trophy along with RMB 500,000 ($USD 70,841) as the grand prize. Close to 200 teams consisting of 10,000 young engineers from around the world signed up for the 2019 RoboMaster competition season, with 32 teams battling it out in the final tournament.

Other participants that competed in RoboMaster 2019 included teams from the South China University of Technology, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, University of Washington, to name a few. Teams participating in this year’s competition included students from Mainland China, the United States, Canada, Japan, and Hong Kong."

– Haye Kesteloo, DroneDJ
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                    [post_content] => The Washington State Academy of Sciences (WSAS) announced 24 new members last week, including ECE professor Mari Ostendorf and affiliate professor Li Deng. Members of WSAS are recognized for their “outstanding record of scientific and technical achievement and their willingness to work on behalf of the Academy to bring the best available science to bear on issues within the state of Washington,” according WSAS.

“It's an honor to join this group of nationally recognized experts in science and technology, but it is also an opportunity to serve the state of Washington, providing input on engineering issues that impact our citizens,” said Ostendorf.

[caption id="attachment_2294" align="alignleft" width="150"]Mari Ostendorf Mari Ostendorf[/caption]

Ostendorf, who has been in the department for 20 years, is an endowed professor of system methodologies in ECE, was recognized for her “pioneering work in speech and natural language processing, leadership developing methods for using prosodic information in automatic speech recognition, parsing and language modeling, topic modeling, and speech search; and internationally recognized student mentoring,” according to WSAS. Ostendorf is also an affiliate faculty member in the linguistics department and the Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science and Engineering and is an associate vice provost for research. She is a fellow in the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the International Speech Communication Association (ISCA) and the Association for Computational Linguistics. She is a former Australian-American Fulbright Scholar and has published over 270 papers on a variety of topics in speech and language processing.

[caption id="attachment_11145" align="alignright" width="150"]Li Deng Li Deng[/caption]

Deng, who has been an affiliate professor in the department for 19 years and received both his master’s degree and Ph.D. from the University of Madison-Wisconsin, received the recognition for his “outstanding and pioneering contributions to artificial intelligence, speech recognition, deep learning, natural language processing and financial engineering, as well as his leadership in signal processing and information processing technology,” according to WSAS. Deng has been the Chief Artificial Intelligence Officer of Citadel since May 2017. Prior to Citadel, he was the Chief Scientist of AI, the founder of the Deep Learning Technology Center, and Partner Research Manager at Microsoft and Microsoft Research , Redmond (2000-2017). He is a Fellow of the IEEE (since 2004), a Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America (since 1993), and a Fellow of the ISCA (since 2011).

New members will be inducted at the 12th annual symposium on Sept. 12.
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                    [post_content] => The Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering sadly announces the recent passing of our friend and colleague, Stephen Graham. Graham had been in the department for 27 years and at the UW since 1989.

[caption id="attachment_15229" align="alignleft" width="150"]Steve Graham Steve Graham[/caption]

"We hired Steve to be an assistant to the Boeing-Egtvedt Chair in the department and an editorial assistant for me as a journal editor,” said Linda Shapiro, professor of electrical & computer engineering. “Steve was wonderful; he could do anything from mundane daily tasks, to typing a very technical book in TeX, and practically running the journal. Through the years in ECE, he has shown that he indeed could handle anything and did it cheerfully and competently.”

Radha Poovendran, professor and chair of ECE noted that Graham’s presence is deeply missed in the department.

“He was a source of all kinds of information about the UW and a very nice person,” Poovendran said.

Graham wore a variety of hats in the department, and in 1997, transferred to the advising office as a program assistant. He was an integral member of the advising team and impacted the student experience through time scheduling and working with them directly.

“Steve was an amazing friend and colleague. When I first started in ECE, Steve was always available and willing to answer my mountain of questions as I learned the ropes. I enjoyed his quick wit and banter and the extensive list of movies, art, books, authors, board games and shows he introduced me to over the years,” said Stephanie Swanson, director of academic services. “I will miss our conversations about life and his presence in the department.”

Daniel Kirschen, professor and associate chair for education and entrepreneurship said he always enjoyed talking to Steve, who was a fountain of knowledge, particularly when it came to all things about the UW.

Graham, who was born in Toledo, Ohio, double majored in history and physics as an undergrad at Carlton College and earned his M.A. from the University of Hawaii focusing on Modern Southeast Asian and Comparative Colonial History.

Outside of work, Graham was a key member of the gaming community, organizing several gaming conventions and running Metro Seattle Gamers, a gaming club. He was also an avid reader and lifelong learner. Graham will be missed both personally and professionally.
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                    [post_content] => Kevin Schneider, a chief engineer at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and an ECE alum and affiliate professor, will receive a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), according to an announcement July 2 from the White House. Recipients are chosen because at the start of their independent research careers, they are showing exceptional promise for leadership in science and technology.

Schneider, who received his B.S. in physics and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering at the UW, focuses his research on distribution system analysis and power system operations. He was nominated by the U.S. Department of Energy. He is the past chair of the Distribution System Analysis Sub-Committee and the current chair of the Analytic Methods for Power Systems (AMPS) Committee.

The PECASE was established in 1996 to recognize the contributions that scientists and engineers have made to STEM fields, as well as education, leadership and public outreach. Participating federal departments and agencies nominate scientists for consideration. Final awards are coordinated by the Office of Science and Technology Policy within the Executive Office of the President.

 
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                    [post_content] => ECE graduate students Bolun Xu and Edward Wang graduated from the department with tenture-track appointments at Columbia University and University of California San Diego, respectively.

[caption id="attachment_15207" align="alignleft" width="300"]Bolun, his daughter, Zhang and Kirschen Bolun, his daughter, Zhang and Kirschen[/caption]

Xu, who was co-advised by ECE professors Daniel Kirschen and Baosen Zhang, received his undergraduate degrees from Shanghai Jiaotong University and the University of Michigan. He received his master’s degree from ETH Zurich and his Ph.D. from the UW. He is currently a postdoctoral associate in MITei and LIDs. He will join Columbia as an assistant professor in earth and environmental engineering in January of 2020.

“Bolun is one of the world’s leading specialists on the integration of battery energy storage in the grid,” Kirschen said.

Edward Wang, who was advised by ECE and CSE professor Shwetak Patel, received his undergraduate degree from Harvey Mudd College and completed doctorate at the UW in the spring. He will join UCSD ECE and the Design Lab as an assistant professor with affiliate appointments with CSE and Bioengineering.

[caption id="attachment_15208" align="alignright" width="300"]Wang and Patel Wang and Patel[/caption]

“Edward is creating new solutions in health monitoring though his expertise in mobile and embedded system prototyping, signal processing, machine learning and a strong command of medical knowledge,” said Patel.

Tenure-track is a professor’s process by which an assistant professor becomes an associate professor and then a professor.
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                    [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_2307" align="alignleft" width="225"]Professor Jenq-Neng Hwang Professor Jenq-Neng Hwang[/caption]

A team of UW students and researchers has been recognized for its significant research in improving transportation systems.

The group, led by Jenq-Neng Hwang, electrical & computer engineering professor, won one of the three track challenges and were named runners-up for the other two from the AI City Challenge at the 2019 IEEE Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition Conference held in Long Beach, Ca. Postdoc Hung-Min Hsu, graduate students Tsung-Wei Huang, Gaoang Wang, Jiarui Cai, Hao Yang (civil engineering), Xinyu Yuan and undergraduates Aotian Zhang and Zhichao (computer science) made up Hwang’s team.

“Our team members consist of all different kinds of expertises, from deep learning detections, statistical machine learning, computer vision, image/video processing algorithms, multiple object tracking within one camera and across multiple non-overlapping cameras,” Hwang said. “Most importantly, they are working closely and very hard from February to early May, day and night, with close discussions as a team.”

[caption id="attachment_15124" align="alignright" width="300"]Hwang and his team Hwang and his team at the challenge workshop.[/caption]

The challenge that the team has been working so hard on tasks competitors to interpret copious hours of traffic footage from cameras on the highways and streets to better understand transportation. Each track challenge has footage from different locations. Teams have to use their own programs to analyze the footage and find the solutions to problems given to them for the challenge.

The group won first place in the first track—which focused on traffic flow analysis. They won runner-up in the second and third tracks. The second was anomaly detection and the third was multi-sensor vehicle detection and reidentification.

The goal of the challenge is to encourage research teams to work hard to make transportation systems smarter, based on sensor data from traffic, signaling systems, infrastructure and transit. For more information on this year’s workshop.
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https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/remembering-steve-graham/
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The winning team from T-DT Northeastern University took home the gold trophy along with RMB 500,000 ($USD 70,841) as the grand prize. Close to 200 teams consisting of 10,000 young engineers from around the world signed up for the 2019 RoboMaster competition season, with 32 teams battling it out in the final tournament. Other participants that competed in RoboMaster 2019 included teams from the South China University of Technology, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, University of Washington, to name a few. Teams participating in this year’s competition included students from Mainland China, the United States, Canada, Japan, and Hong Kong." – Haye Kesteloo, DroneDJ [post_title] => Blake Hannaford leads UW robotics team [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => blake-hannaford-leads-uw-robotics-team [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-08-14 15:04:01 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-08-14 22:04:01 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=15465 [menu_order] => 1 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 15358 [post_author] => 22 [post_date] => 2019-07-22 14:22:21 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-07-22 21:22:21 [post_content] => The Washington State Academy of Sciences (WSAS) announced 24 new members last week, including ECE professor Mari Ostendorf and affiliate professor Li Deng. Members of WSAS are recognized for their “outstanding record of scientific and technical achievement and their willingness to work on behalf of the Academy to bring the best available science to bear on issues within the state of Washington,” according WSAS. “It's an honor to join this group of nationally recognized experts in science and technology, but it is also an opportunity to serve the state of Washington, providing input on engineering issues that impact our citizens,” said Ostendorf. [caption id="attachment_2294" align="alignleft" width="150"]Mari Ostendorf Mari Ostendorf[/caption] Ostendorf, who has been in the department for 20 years, is an endowed professor of system methodologies in ECE, was recognized for her “pioneering work in speech and natural language processing, leadership developing methods for using prosodic information in automatic speech recognition, parsing and language modeling, topic modeling, and speech search; and internationally recognized student mentoring,” according to WSAS. Ostendorf is also an affiliate faculty member in the linguistics department and the Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science and Engineering and is an associate vice provost for research. She is a fellow in the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the International Speech Communication Association (ISCA) and the Association for Computational Linguistics. She is a former Australian-American Fulbright Scholar and has published over 270 papers on a variety of topics in speech and language processing. [caption id="attachment_11145" align="alignright" width="150"]Li Deng Li Deng[/caption] Deng, who has been an affiliate professor in the department for 19 years and received both his master’s degree and Ph.D. from the University of Madison-Wisconsin, received the recognition for his “outstanding and pioneering contributions to artificial intelligence, speech recognition, deep learning, natural language processing and financial engineering, as well as his leadership in signal processing and information processing technology,” according to WSAS. Deng has been the Chief Artificial Intelligence Officer of Citadel since May 2017. Prior to Citadel, he was the Chief Scientist of AI, the founder of the Deep Learning Technology Center, and Partner Research Manager at Microsoft and Microsoft Research , Redmond (2000-2017). He is a Fellow of the IEEE (since 2004), a Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America (since 1993), and a Fellow of the ISCA (since 2011). New members will be inducted at the 12th annual symposium on Sept. 12. [post_title] => Two ECE faculty named as latest members of WSAS [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => two-ece-faculty-named-as-latest-members-of-wsas [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-07-31 13:41:26 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-07-31 20:41:26 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=15358 [menu_order] => 2 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 15227 [post_author] => 22 [post_date] => 2019-07-15 09:48:12 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-07-15 16:48:12 [post_content] => The Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering sadly announces the recent passing of our friend and colleague, Stephen Graham. Graham had been in the department for 27 years and at the UW since 1989. [caption id="attachment_15229" align="alignleft" width="150"]Steve Graham Steve Graham[/caption] "We hired Steve to be an assistant to the Boeing-Egtvedt Chair in the department and an editorial assistant for me as a journal editor,” said Linda Shapiro, professor of electrical & computer engineering. “Steve was wonderful; he could do anything from mundane daily tasks, to typing a very technical book in TeX, and practically running the journal. Through the years in ECE, he has shown that he indeed could handle anything and did it cheerfully and competently.” Radha Poovendran, professor and chair of ECE noted that Graham’s presence is deeply missed in the department. “He was a source of all kinds of information about the UW and a very nice person,” Poovendran said. Graham wore a variety of hats in the department, and in 1997, transferred to the advising office as a program assistant. He was an integral member of the advising team and impacted the student experience through time scheduling and working with them directly. “Steve was an amazing friend and colleague. When I first started in ECE, Steve was always available and willing to answer my mountain of questions as I learned the ropes. I enjoyed his quick wit and banter and the extensive list of movies, art, books, authors, board games and shows he introduced me to over the years,” said Stephanie Swanson, director of academic services. “I will miss our conversations about life and his presence in the department.” Daniel Kirschen, professor and associate chair for education and entrepreneurship said he always enjoyed talking to Steve, who was a fountain of knowledge, particularly when it came to all things about the UW. Graham, who was born in Toledo, Ohio, double majored in history and physics as an undergrad at Carlton College and earned his M.A. from the University of Hawaii focusing on Modern Southeast Asian and Comparative Colonial History. Outside of work, Graham was a key member of the gaming community, organizing several gaming conventions and running Metro Seattle Gamers, a gaming club. He was also an avid reader and lifelong learner. Graham will be missed both personally and professionally. [post_title] => Remembering Steve Graham [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => remembering-steve-graham [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-07-15 12:58:36 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-07-15 19:58:36 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=15227 [menu_order] => 3 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 15220 [post_author] => 22 [post_date] => 2019-07-11 15:57:43 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-07-11 22:57:43 [post_content] => Kevin Schneider, a chief engineer at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and an ECE alum and affiliate professor, will receive a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), according to an announcement July 2 from the White House. Recipients are chosen because at the start of their independent research careers, they are showing exceptional promise for leadership in science and technology. Schneider, who received his B.S. in physics and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering at the UW, focuses his research on distribution system analysis and power system operations. He was nominated by the U.S. Department of Energy. He is the past chair of the Distribution System Analysis Sub-Committee and the current chair of the Analytic Methods for Power Systems (AMPS) Committee. The PECASE was established in 1996 to recognize the contributions that scientists and engineers have made to STEM fields, as well as education, leadership and public outreach. Participating federal departments and agencies nominate scientists for consideration. Final awards are coordinated by the Office of Science and Technology Policy within the Executive Office of the President.   [post_title] => ECE affiliate professor to receive 2019 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => ece-affiliate-professor-to-receive-2019-presidential-early-career-award-for-scientists-and-engineers [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-07-11 16:02:11 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-07-11 23:02:11 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=15220 [menu_order] => 4 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 15204 [post_author] => 22 [post_date] => 2019-07-09 16:49:44 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-07-09 23:49:44 [post_content] => ECE graduate students Bolun Xu and Edward Wang graduated from the department with tenture-track appointments at Columbia University and University of California San Diego, respectively. [caption id="attachment_15207" align="alignleft" width="300"]Bolun, his daughter, Zhang and Kirschen Bolun, his daughter, Zhang and Kirschen[/caption] Xu, who was co-advised by ECE professors Daniel Kirschen and Baosen Zhang, received his undergraduate degrees from Shanghai Jiaotong University and the University of Michigan. He received his master’s degree from ETH Zurich and his Ph.D. from the UW. He is currently a postdoctoral associate in MITei and LIDs. He will join Columbia as an assistant professor in earth and environmental engineering in January of 2020. “Bolun is one of the world’s leading specialists on the integration of battery energy storage in the grid,” Kirschen said. Edward Wang, who was advised by ECE and CSE professor Shwetak Patel, received his undergraduate degree from Harvey Mudd College and completed doctorate at the UW in the spring. He will join UCSD ECE and the Design Lab as an assistant professor with affiliate appointments with CSE and Bioengineering. [caption id="attachment_15208" align="alignright" width="300"]Wang and Patel Wang and Patel[/caption] “Edward is creating new solutions in health monitoring though his expertise in mobile and embedded system prototyping, signal processing, machine learning and a strong command of medical knowledge,” said Patel. Tenure-track is a professor’s process by which an assistant professor becomes an associate professor and then a professor. [post_title] => ECE graduates receive tenure-track faculty appointments [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => ece-graduates-receive-tenure-track-faculty-appointments [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-07-09 16:49:54 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-07-09 23:49:54 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=15204 [menu_order] => 5 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 15121 [post_author] => 22 [post_date] => 2019-07-01 15:20:22 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-07-01 22:20:22 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_2307" align="alignleft" width="225"]Professor Jenq-Neng Hwang Professor Jenq-Neng Hwang[/caption] A team of UW students and researchers has been recognized for its significant research in improving transportation systems. The group, led by Jenq-Neng Hwang, electrical & computer engineering professor, won one of the three track challenges and were named runners-up for the other two from the AI City Challenge at the 2019 IEEE Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition Conference held in Long Beach, Ca. Postdoc Hung-Min Hsu, graduate students Tsung-Wei Huang, Gaoang Wang, Jiarui Cai, Hao Yang (civil engineering), Xinyu Yuan and undergraduates Aotian Zhang and Zhichao (computer science) made up Hwang’s team. “Our team members consist of all different kinds of expertises, from deep learning detections, statistical machine learning, computer vision, image/video processing algorithms, multiple object tracking within one camera and across multiple non-overlapping cameras,” Hwang said. “Most importantly, they are working closely and very hard from February to early May, day and night, with close discussions as a team.” [caption id="attachment_15124" align="alignright" width="300"]Hwang and his team Hwang and his team at the challenge workshop.[/caption] The challenge that the team has been working so hard on tasks competitors to interpret copious hours of traffic footage from cameras on the highways and streets to better understand transportation. Each track challenge has footage from different locations. Teams have to use their own programs to analyze the footage and find the solutions to problems given to them for the challenge. The group won first place in the first track—which focused on traffic flow analysis. They won runner-up in the second and third tracks. The second was anomaly detection and the third was multi-sensor vehicle detection and reidentification. The goal of the challenge is to encourage research teams to work hard to make transportation systems smarter, based on sensor data from traffic, signaling systems, infrastructure and transit. For more information on this year’s workshop. [post_title] => ECE team, led by Professor Jenq-Neng Hwang, wins competition in AI challenges [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => ece-team-wins-competition-in-ai-challenges [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-07-02 20:29:43 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-07-03 03:29:43 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=15121 [menu_order] => 6 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 6 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 15465 [post_author] => 23 [post_date] => 2019-08-14 15:02:48 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-08-14 22:02:48 [post_content] => "RoboMaster, an annual robotics competition for aspiring young engineers and university students, concluded its 2019 competition in Bao’an Stadium in Shenzhen, China. The winning team from T-DT Northeastern University took home the gold trophy along with RMB 500,000 ($USD 70,841) as the grand prize. Close to 200 teams consisting of 10,000 young engineers from around the world signed up for the 2019 RoboMaster competition season, with 32 teams battling it out in the final tournament. Other participants that competed in RoboMaster 2019 included teams from the South China University of Technology, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, University of Washington, to name a few. Teams participating in this year’s competition included students from Mainland China, the United States, Canada, Japan, and Hong Kong." – Haye Kesteloo, DroneDJ [post_title] => Blake Hannaford leads UW robotics team [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => blake-hannaford-leads-uw-robotics-team [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-08-14 15:04:01 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-08-14 22:04:01 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=15465 [menu_order] => 1 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 660 [max_num_pages] => 110 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => 1 [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => 1 [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => 0f87fe429e20a1f4e53778b54d8d4588 [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => 1 [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed ) [compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ) ) )
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