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Built in Washington: Chase Deitner

Chase Deitner balances ECE studies with winning medals for UW Rowing

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Built in Washington: Chase Deitner Banner

Student-led team "SENSOL Systems" places 3rd in Science & Technology Showcase

SENSOL is developing an ADA-compliant modular crosswalk addition that overlays the road, lighting up pedestrians as they move across it.

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Student-led team

Ph.D. students' podcast "Paper Boys" delivers

ECE's James Rosenthal and A&A's Charlie Kelly unpack attention-grabbing science headlines with levity in an engaging new weekly podcast series.

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Ph.D. students' podcast

The one ring — to track your finger’s location

Could this be the beginning of a new era of VR and AR tech? ECE doctoral student Farshid Salemi Parizi and Prof. Shwetak Patel have created AuraRing, a 5 DoF electromagnetic ring and wristband combination that can detect the precise location of someone’s finger and continuously track hand movements.

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The one ring — to track your finger’s location Banner

Watch Professor Stéphane Mallat's full Lytle Lecture Series videos now!

ECE hosted world-renowned applied mathematician & research scientist, Dr. Stéphane Mallat, on Dec. 3, 2019.

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Watch Professor Stéphane Mallat's full Lytle Lecture Series videos now! Banner

Professor Joshua R. Smith Honored as IEEE Fellow

Smith was named a Fellow of the IEEE in recognition of his contributions to far‐ and near‐field wireless power, backscatter communication and electric field sensing.

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Professor Joshua R. Smith Honored as IEEE Fellow Banner

News + Events

https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/chase-deitner/
https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/sensolsystems/
https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/paper-boys/
https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/aura_ring/
The one ring — to track your finger’s location

The one ring — to track your finger’s location

Could this be the beginning of a new era of VR and AR tech? ECE doctoral student Farshid Salemi Parizi and Prof. Shwetak Patel have created AuraRing, a 5 DoF electromagnetic ring and wristband combination that can detect the precise location of someone’s finger and continuously track hand movements.

https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/jesus-ocana-planet/
https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/stephane-mallat-lytle-videos/
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                    [post_content] => For Chase Deitner, competing and engineering are all part of his daily routine. From racing for UW's Mens Rowing team in "long pair races" in the morning, to taking electrical engineering exams during the day, and then running a stadium in the afternoon, Chase always finds himself striving to be the best.

Living in Perth, Australia as a teenager, Chase decided to study at the University of Washington for its strong, competitive engineering program.

"Both of my parents were engineers, so I knew I wanted to become one as well," recalls Chase.
"I knew UW had different engineering programs and it would be a good place for me to figure out what type I wanted to specialize in."
Chase had been rowing for his high school team for a couple of years, but because of his size and erg scores, he knew he would not be recruited at the college level. However, Chase loved the community and the competition that came with rowing, so he wanted to continue in college no matter what. His plan was always to walk-on to the team wherever he ended up. "I had absolutely no idea how good the UW team was before coming here," Chase says. "All I knew was they were a Division I school, but I didn't really know what that meant either." So, Chase showed up to the UW men's rowing team tryouts with dozens of other guys who were much bigger and stronger than him. [caption id="attachment_16953" align="alignright" width="741"] Chase Deitner holds up a 'W' after winning bronze at the World Rowing Under-23 Championships in the men's lightweight quad sculls in 2018.[/caption] "The tryouts were the most challenging, stressful and competitive two weeks I had ever gone through," he recalls. In his third year on the team now, Chase has raced at the Pac-12 championships twice, once at the IRA championships and once at the World Rowing Under-23 Championships, where he won the bronze medal in the men's lightweight quad sculls in 2018. Aside from his success on the water, Chase also has the team's highest GPA as an electrical engineering major. Chase chose that particular major because of how competitive the application and acceptance process is.
"I really enjoy the competitive aspect of my major," Chase says, "I enjoy learning too, but the competitiveness that comes with the work, problem-solving, and exams is what makes it fun."
Whether it's a race on the water or a midterm exam, Chase likes to win. While staying competitive, Chase has found that the best way to manage, succeed and enjoy everything he does is to stay focused and present. "I try to be where I am at all times, whether I am studying, erging, racing or hanging out with friends, I try to commit a hundred percent of my time to that one moment," says Chase, "and that makes everything much more effective, and also more enjoyable." Rowing has taught Chase how to enjoy the competition and to always try to perform at his best, both on and off the water. [caption id="attachment_16952" align="alignleft" width="494"] Chase Deitner rowing[/caption]                  
This story was originally featured in UW Rowing's "Built In Washington" series by women's team varsity coxswain Marley Avritt.
[post_title] => Built in Washington: Chase Deitner [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => chase-deitner [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-02-18 10:45:28 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-18 18:45:28 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=16949 [menu_order] => 1 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 16862 [post_author] => 25 [post_date] => 2020-02-12 12:01:16 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-12 20:01:16 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_16895" align="alignright" width="426"]SENSOL Module One of SENSOL's Crosswalk Modules being illuminated.[/caption] It's a dark and rainy night. You step into a crosswalk. A car comes screeching towards you, barely missing you. Luckily, you are not one of the 6,000+ pedestrians killed last year nationally in traffic collisions. SENSOL Systems believes these deaths are preventable! SENSOL is developing an ADA-compliant modular crosswalk addition that overlays onto the road, lighting up pedestrians as they move across it. SENSOLS's product will improve safety and visibility without permanently changing roadways. The crosswalk will be triggered when feet, wheelchairs or bicycles pass over them, illuminating their exact location, visible at both a distance and up close by cars, bicycles, buses and other pedestrians. SENSOL’s cross-disciplinary startup team consists of graduate and undergraduate students in various majors, including two Electrical & Computer Engineering students, Richard Burberry and Yuhang Li. In addition, Scott Cavanagh, a Mechanical Engineering student, works alongside Burberry and Li to design the electrical components of SENSOL's Crosswalks.

The full team includes:

Business – Janie Bube, Lorenzo Guio, Garrett King, Iman Haji. Engineering – Rajat Singh, Jimmy Liu, Richard Burberry, Scott Cavanagh, Yuhang Li. Communication – Chandler Simon, Alex Wong, Trey Michaels, Jonah Wu. Read more about the team here.

“We are committed to assisting Seattle in their ‘Vision Zero’ initiative to limit traffic fatalities/severe injuries to zero by 2030.” - Janie Bube

[caption id="attachment_16873" align="alignnone" width="790"] Map of traffic incidents in Seattle between 2004-2020. The colored bar on the right represents the # of incidents per intersection.[/caption] SENSOL is working diligently to ensure their product will be adopted globally to improve pedestrian safety. In fact, SENSOL has been gaining recognition for its mission and product, most recently winning third place on January 28, 2020, in the Science & Technology Showcase (STS) hosted by UW's Science & Engineering Business Association (SEBA) and the Buerk Center for Entrepreneurship. This year’s STS event featured 18 finalist teams from a record pool of applicants. The annual showcase shines a spotlight on science and technology-based innovations coming out of the University while providing students with the opportunity to pitch their commercial potential. Seattle-area entrepreneurs and investors served as judges and provided in-person feedback and mentorship. Prior to SENSOL's win in the STS competition, they have also been awarded the Campus Sustainability Fund (CSF) Grant, Amazon Catalyst Fellowship and the NSF I-CORPS Grant through CoMotion. [caption id="attachment_16864" align="alignleft" width="599"]SENSOL STS SENSOL Sytems after winning 3rd place at the Science & Technology Showcase.[/caption] SENSOL is the only crosswalk reducing collisions by directly lighting up pedestrians' location and movement as they walk across the street. Seattle spends tens of millions of dollars a year alone on pedestrian improvements. SENSOL’s crosswalk is not only safer but also less expensive than existing solutions. The Seattle Department of Transportation, the City of Maple Valley and the University of Washington have shown interest in both demoing and testing SENSOL’s product at various locations during Summer 2020. So the next time you cross the street, your every step will be illuminated.   SENSOL Logo   [post_title] => Student-led team "SENSOL Systems" places 3rd in Science & Technology Showcase [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => sensolsystems [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-02-13 15:49:56 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-13 23:49:56 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=16862 [menu_order] => 2 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 16848 [post_author] => 25 [post_date] => 2020-02-11 14:52:26 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-11 22:52:26 [post_content] => [caption id="" align="alignnone" width="800"] James Rosenthal (left) and Charlie Kelly deliver a weekly podcast that unpacks a complex science paper that has attracted astonishing or absurd headlines.[/caption] Paper Boys logo "Science papers delivered weekly"Two UW engineering Ph.D. students, ECE's James Rosenthal and A&A's Charlie Kelly, co-host the "Paper Boys" podcast, a weekly unpacking of science papers with astonishing or absurd headlines covered in the media. “Early humans hooked up with other species a whole bunch” and “An alien spaceship may have passed by Earth in 2017, Harvard scientists say” are real headlines from respected media outlets. Were these headlines accurate? Each week, "Paper Boys" presents a science paper covered in the media, then they explore the complex research behind the headlines and break down whether the flashy headline was justified. The result is a fun, engaging but didactic conversation uncovering obscure phenomena. UW's Amy Sprague interviewed James and Charlie recently about their novel podcast.

One of the strengths of the podcast is the fun rapport you two have. How did you meet?

James: We actually met on the first day of grad school. We randomly sat next to each other at an orientation at the library. Our first conversation quickly steered towards outer space, and it was instant friendship after that. Our shared passion for science and exploration was a big driver for starting the podcast. Charlie: The reason we get along so well on air is that what you hear is only 1% of our actual time spent together. Our friendship was forged over beverages, squash courts, and hiking trails for years before we started the show. People are always surprised we have pastimes together that are completely unrelated to podcasting — like scouring the UW campus for the coolest trees we can find (seriously people, go check out the Brockman Memorial Tree Tour).
  "Our friendship was forged over beverages, squash courts, and hiking trails for years before we started the show." – Charlie
 
  "Our shared passion for science and exploration was a big driver for starting the podcast." – James
 

What was your motivation for this podcast? Was there a particular headline that misrepresented research that made the decision for you?

Charlie: We had been toying with the idea of starting a “journal club” for a while, where the idea was to get together over a beer every week and chat about a paper one of us had read. At the same time, we had a radio show on Rainy Dawg where we pretended to be astronauts and talked about space news a lot. Eventually we realized we could combine the two and have a sort of journal club in radio format, and Paper Boys was born. James: Another motivation for the podcast was to help our audience see the personal, human element behind research. After reading many popular news articles about science, it is easy to feel distanced from the seemingly cold, objective “researchers” mentioned in the articles. We felt this distance might be one factor contributing to popular distrust of science. In reality, these “researchers” are people who have lives, friends, and families, and who generally want to make the world a better place. By discussing the research in a warmer, more casual way, we hope people can feel more connected to interesting, meaningful science.
“After reading many popular news articles about science, it is easy to feel distanced from the seemingly cold, objective 'researchers' mentioned in the articles. We felt this distance might be one factor contributing to popular distrust of science. In reality, these 'researchers' are people who have lives, friends, and families, and who generally want to make the world a better place." – James

Are there episodes or findings that really stand out for you?

James: So many! People I know outside of Charlie are probably sick of hearing me talk about new facts I learned from doing the show. There are of course some papers that simply reinforce an expected outcome (e.g. sleep is important and you should get enough), but every paper introduces some surprising, insightful nuances. If I had to pick off the top of my head though, I would choose the episodes “Is Planet 9 Actually a Black Hole?” and “Can You Prove You’re Human in One Word?” Charlie:  Another thing that makes episodes stand out is when the audience is really engaged. We had an episode covering the quintessential pop science debate: “Are eggs really bad for you?” That was almost a year ago and we still hear from fans that we ruined breakfast for them. Charlie's and James' favorite episodes:

How do you prepare individually and together for each episode?

Charlie: We decided early on that each episode would have one of us select the paper and research it in-depth, while the other person learns live on air and asks questions. It’s a good format for us because we alternate roles every week, so we can do a lot of the prep work individually before getting together to record. When I’m researching a paper, I personally like to print it out and read it at the IMA — though admittedly I probably look silly trying to use a highlighter on the StairMaster.

Has your process evolved as you’ve gained more experience?

James: I would say our process for reading papers has changed. At the start of grad school, it would take Charlie and I nearly a full week to read through a single research paper. We’d have to go through and find the definition of nearly every other word. Now for a paper on an unfamiliar topic, it might take 1-2 hours to read and take notes. The big epiphany was realizing that all scientific papers have a lot of similarities, in content and structure. Now when we start reading a paper on a completely foreign topic, we can break it down much faster. We just ask ourselves the basics, like “OK, the terminology is different, but how did the authors apply the scientific method? What’s their hypothesis? What are their methods? What did they find?”

Have any authors of the papers you’ve featured contacted you?

Charlie: Actually yes! Occasionally we will share the episode with the authors of the paper we covered and we usually get a great response. We’ve also had authors tweet at us out of the blue, which is exciting because it means someone else shared it with them.

Challenge! Write a headline-worthy of Paper Boys for each other's research.

Charlie: “Tiny wireless brain implant could soon be used for monkey mind control.” And like any good science headline, there’s a good chance I’ve grossly misrepresented James’ work. James: Haha nice, Charlie! That gives me more credit than I deserve, but I’ll take it. Here is my best news headline summary of Charlie’s research: “Plasma aerocapture technology could open unexplored reaches of the solar system — and the possibility of discovering alien life.”
Story courtesy of Amy Sprague | PM & Communications | UW Aero & Astro [post_title] => Ph.D. students' podcast "Paper Boys" delivers [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => paper-boys [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-02-11 14:54:45 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-11 22:54:45 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=16848 [menu_order] => 3 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 16802 [post_author] => 25 [post_date] => 2020-02-06 10:21:26 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-06 18:21:26 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_16806" align="alignnone" width="920"] With continuous tracking, AuraRing can pick up handwriting — potentially for short responses to text messages. Dennis Wise / University of Washington[/caption]

Smart technology keeps getting smaller. There are smartphones, smartwatches and now, smart rings - devices that allow someone to use simple finger gestures to control other technology.

Researchers at the University of Washington have created AuraRing, a ring and wristband combination that can detect the precise location of someone’s index finger and continuously track hand movements. The ring emits a signal that can be picked up on the wristband, which can then identify the position and orientation of the ring — and the finger it’s attached to. The research team published these results Dec. 11 in Proceedings of the ACM on Interactive, Mobile, Wearable and Ubiquitous Technologies.
“We’re thinking about the next generation of computing platforms,” said co-lead author Eric Whitmire, who completed this research as a doctoral student at the Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering. “We wanted a tool that captures the fine-grain manipulation we do with our fingers — not just a gesture or where your finger’s pointed, but something that can track your finger completely.”
AuraRing is composed of a coil of wire wrapped 800 times around a 3D-printed ring. A current running through the wire generates a magnetic field, which is picked up by three sensors on the wristband. Based on what values the sensors detect, the researchers can continuously identify the exact position of the ring in space. From there, they can determine where the user’s finger is located.  

The ring in AuraRing (left) is composed of a coil of wire wrapped 800 times around a 3D printed ring. The AuraRing wristband (right) uses three sensors (one shown here: white box in the lower left) to pick up the magnetic field generated by the ring. Credit: Dennis Wise/University of Washington

  “To have continuous tracking in other smart rings you’d have to stream all the data using wireless communication. That part consumes a lot of power, which is why a lot of smart rings only detect gestures and send those specific commands,” said co-lead author Farshid Salemi Parizi, a doctoral student in the Electrical & Computer Engineering Department. “But AuraRing’s ring consumes only 2.3 milliwatts of power, which produces an oscillating magnetic field that the wristband can constantly sense. In this way, there’s no need for any communication from the ring to the wristband.” With continuous tracking, AuraRing can pick up handwriting — potentially for short responses to text messages — or allow someone to have a virtual reality avatar hand that mimics what they’re doing with their actual hand. In addition, because AuraRing uses magnetic fields, it can still track hands even when they are out of sight, such as when a user is on a crowded bus and can’t reach their phone. [caption id="attachment_16805" align="alignnone" width="908"] AuraRing can allow someone to have a virtual reality avatar hand that mimics what they’re doing with their actual hand. Dennis Wise / University of Washington[/caption] “We can also easily detect taps, flicks or even a small pinch versus a big pinch,” Salemi Parizi said. “This gives you added interaction space. For example, if you write ‘hello,’ you could use a flick or a pinch to send that data. Or on a Mario-like game, a pinch could make the character jump, but a flick could make them super jump.” The researchers designed AuraRing to be ready to use as soon as it comes out of the box and not be dependent on a specific user. They tested the system on 12 participants with different hand sizes. The team compared the actual location of a participant’s finger to where AuraRing said it was. Most of the time, the system’s tracked location agreed with the actual location within a few millimeters. This ring and wristband combination could be useful for more than games and smartphones, the team said.
“Because AuraRing continuously monitors hand movements and not just gestures, it provides a rich set of inputs that multiple industries could take advantage of,” said senior author Shwetak Patel, a professor in both the Electrical & Computer Engineering Department and the Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering. “For example, AuraRing could detect the onset of Parkinson’s disease by tracking subtle hand tremors or help with stroke rehabilitation by providing feedback on hand movement exercises.”
The technology behind AuraRing is something that could be easily added to smartwatches and other wristband devices, according to the team.
“It’s all about super powers,” Salemi Parizi said. “You would still have all the capabilities that today’s smartwatches have to offer, but when you want the additional benefits, you just put on your ring.”
The team has a related project called Aura, a small controller for mobile VR devices that has the location-tracking accuracy of desktop VR devices. This research was funded by UW Reality Lab, Facebook, Google and Futurewei. For more information, contact Salemi Parizi at farshid@cs.washington.edu, Whitmire at emwhit@cs.washington.edu and Patel at shwetak@cs.washington.edu. This article originally appeared in UW Today, by Sarah McQuate. [post_title] => The one ring — to track your finger’s location [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => aura_ring [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-02-11 14:54:07 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-11 22:54:07 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=16802 [menu_order] => 4 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 16490 [post_author] => 25 [post_date] => 2019-12-12 16:27:37 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-12-13 00:27:37 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_16492" align="alignright" width="596"] Jesus Contreras Ocaña at the MOPGA 2nd Anniversary Event[/caption] ECE Alum Jesus Contreras Ocaña, who graduated from UW with his masters in Electrical Engineering in 2015 and Ph.D. in Power Systems in 2018, recently attended the second anniversary event of French President Emmanuel Macron's "Make Our Planet Great Again" initiative. This past October, Contreras Ocaña concluded a one-year post-doctoral research fellowship at the Université de Grenoble Alpes and G2Elab, where he conducted research related to microgrids for the Eco-SESA program. His postdoctoral research was funded by the Make Our Planet Great Again program. Currently, he works in Brussels, Belgium as a Smart Energy Consultant at ENGIE Impact (Tractebel). The Make Our Planet Great Again program was launched on June 1, 2017, following the decision of the United States to leave the Paris Agreement on climate change. It is a call to researchers and students, entrepreneurs, associations and NGOs, students and all civil society to mobilize and join France to lead the fight against global warming.
"If we want to prepare collective changes, adapt our behavior, we need science. We need students. We need researchers," stated President Macron.
[caption id="attachment_16493" align="alignright" width="595"] Jesus Contreras Ocaña's Selfie with French President Emmanuel Macron[/caption] To celebrate the second anniversary of this program, Contreras Ocaña was invited to a ceremony at the Elysée Palace in Paris, where he and other invitees discussed the importance of climate change-related research, the Make Our Planet Great Again program, and how it could be improved for future cohorts. Contreras Ocaña was also lucky enough to catch a selfie with President Macron. Congratulations, Jesus, on your continued success and commitment to improving the conditions of the climate crisis. [post_title] => Alum Jesus Contreras Ocaña attends Make Our Planet Great Again event [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => jesus-ocana-planet [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-12 17:28:08 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-13 01:28:08 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=16490 [menu_order] => 6 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 16561 [post_author] => 25 [post_date] => 2019-12-18 11:32:35 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-12-18 19:32:35 [post_content] =>

The Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering’s 2019 Dean W. Lytle Endowed Lecture Series videos are now available! The Lytle Lecture Series is the department’s premier annual event, featuring internationally renowned researchers in the field of communications, signal processing, control systems and machine learning. This year we were extremely excited to have the world-renowned applied mathematician and research scientist, Dr. Stéphane Mallat, as our guest speaker. Dr. Mallat is known for his fundamental work in wavelet theory, with major impact in machine learning, signal processing, music synthesis, harmonic analysis and image segmentation. Click to read the Abstract on Dr. Mallat's presentation, “Mathematical Mysteries of Deep Neural Networks” and watch the full recording of the 2019 Lytle Lecture below!

The Lytle Lecture Series was hosted by ECE Professor Les Atlas, and ECE Professor and Associate Chair for Research and Entrepreneurship, Maryam Fazel. The lecture series was made possible by a generous endowment from the Lytle family in honor of the late ECE Professor, Dean W. Lytle.

Lytle Lecture 2019 - Dr. Stéphane Mallat

If the video doesn't display properly, click here.  
 

ECE Colloquium Series 2019 - Dr. Stéphane Mallat

Professor Mallat also presented a lecture earlier that morning on “Interpretable Deep Networks for Classification, Generation and Physics” for the ECE Colloquium Series. Below is a video of that lecture. If the video doesn't display properly, click here.     [post_title] => Watch Professor Stéphane Mallat's full Lytle Lecture Series videos now! [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => stephane-mallat-lytle-videos [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-19 10:50:14 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-19 18:50:14 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=16561 [menu_order] => 7 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [_numposts:protected] => 6 [_rendered:protected] => 1 [_classes:protected] => Array ( [0] => view-block [1] => block--spotlight-robust-news ) [_finalHTML:protected] =>
https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/chase-deitner/
https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/sensolsystems/
https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/paper-boys/
https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/aura_ring/
The one ring — to track your finger’s location

The one ring — to track your finger’s location

Could this be the beginning of a new era of VR and AR tech? ECE doctoral student Farshid Salemi Parizi and Prof. Shwetak Patel have created AuraRing, a 5 DoF electromagnetic ring and wristband combination that can detect the precise location of someone’s finger and continuously track hand movements.

https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/jesus-ocana-planet/
https://www.ece.uw.edu/spotlight/stephane-mallat-lytle-videos/
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"I knew UW had different engineering programs and it would be a good place for me to figure out what type I wanted to specialize in."
Chase had been rowing for his high school team for a couple of years, but because of his size and erg scores, he knew he would not be recruited at the college level. However, Chase loved the community and the competition that came with rowing, so he wanted to continue in college no matter what. His plan was always to walk-on to the team wherever he ended up. "I had absolutely no idea how good the UW team was before coming here," Chase says. "All I knew was they were a Division I school, but I didn't really know what that meant either." So, Chase showed up to the UW men's rowing team tryouts with dozens of other guys who were much bigger and stronger than him. [caption id="attachment_16953" align="alignright" width="741"] Chase Deitner holds up a 'W' after winning bronze at the World Rowing Under-23 Championships in the men's lightweight quad sculls in 2018.[/caption] "The tryouts were the most challenging, stressful and competitive two weeks I had ever gone through," he recalls. In his third year on the team now, Chase has raced at the Pac-12 championships twice, once at the IRA championships and once at the World Rowing Under-23 Championships, where he won the bronze medal in the men's lightweight quad sculls in 2018. Aside from his success on the water, Chase also has the team's highest GPA as an electrical engineering major. Chase chose that particular major because of how competitive the application and acceptance process is.
"I really enjoy the competitive aspect of my major," Chase says, "I enjoy learning too, but the competitiveness that comes with the work, problem-solving, and exams is what makes it fun."
Whether it's a race on the water or a midterm exam, Chase likes to win. While staying competitive, Chase has found that the best way to manage, succeed and enjoy everything he does is to stay focused and present. "I try to be where I am at all times, whether I am studying, erging, racing or hanging out with friends, I try to commit a hundred percent of my time to that one moment," says Chase, "and that makes everything much more effective, and also more enjoyable." Rowing has taught Chase how to enjoy the competition and to always try to perform at his best, both on and off the water. [caption id="attachment_16952" align="alignleft" width="494"] Chase Deitner rowing[/caption]                  
This story was originally featured in UW Rowing's "Built In Washington" series by women's team varsity coxswain Marley Avritt.
[post_title] => Built in Washington: Chase Deitner [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => chase-deitner [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-02-18 10:45:28 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-18 18:45:28 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=16949 [menu_order] => 1 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 16862 [post_author] => 25 [post_date] => 2020-02-12 12:01:16 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-12 20:01:16 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_16895" align="alignright" width="426"]SENSOL Module One of SENSOL's Crosswalk Modules being illuminated.[/caption] It's a dark and rainy night. You step into a crosswalk. A car comes screeching towards you, barely missing you. Luckily, you are not one of the 6,000+ pedestrians killed last year nationally in traffic collisions. SENSOL Systems believes these deaths are preventable! SENSOL is developing an ADA-compliant modular crosswalk addition that overlays onto the road, lighting up pedestrians as they move across it. SENSOLS's product will improve safety and visibility without permanently changing roadways. The crosswalk will be triggered when feet, wheelchairs or bicycles pass over them, illuminating their exact location, visible at both a distance and up close by cars, bicycles, buses and other pedestrians. SENSOL’s cross-disciplinary startup team consists of graduate and undergraduate students in various majors, including two Electrical & Computer Engineering students, Richard Burberry and Yuhang Li. In addition, Scott Cavanagh, a Mechanical Engineering student, works alongside Burberry and Li to design the electrical components of SENSOL's Crosswalks.

The full team includes:

Business – Janie Bube, Lorenzo Guio, Garrett King, Iman Haji. Engineering – Rajat Singh, Jimmy Liu, Richard Burberry, Scott Cavanagh, Yuhang Li. Communication – Chandler Simon, Alex Wong, Trey Michaels, Jonah Wu. Read more about the team here.

“We are committed to assisting Seattle in their ‘Vision Zero’ initiative to limit traffic fatalities/severe injuries to zero by 2030.” - Janie Bube

[caption id="attachment_16873" align="alignnone" width="790"] Map of traffic incidents in Seattle between 2004-2020. The colored bar on the right represents the # of incidents per intersection.[/caption] SENSOL is working diligently to ensure their product will be adopted globally to improve pedestrian safety. In fact, SENSOL has been gaining recognition for its mission and product, most recently winning third place on January 28, 2020, in the Science & Technology Showcase (STS) hosted by UW's Science & Engineering Business Association (SEBA) and the Buerk Center for Entrepreneurship. This year’s STS event featured 18 finalist teams from a record pool of applicants. The annual showcase shines a spotlight on science and technology-based innovations coming out of the University while providing students with the opportunity to pitch their commercial potential. Seattle-area entrepreneurs and investors served as judges and provided in-person feedback and mentorship. Prior to SENSOL's win in the STS competition, they have also been awarded the Campus Sustainability Fund (CSF) Grant, Amazon Catalyst Fellowship and the NSF I-CORPS Grant through CoMotion. [caption id="attachment_16864" align="alignleft" width="599"]SENSOL STS SENSOL Sytems after winning 3rd place at the Science & Technology Showcase.[/caption] SENSOL is the only crosswalk reducing collisions by directly lighting up pedestrians' location and movement as they walk across the street. Seattle spends tens of millions of dollars a year alone on pedestrian improvements. SENSOL’s crosswalk is not only safer but also less expensive than existing solutions. The Seattle Department of Transportation, the City of Maple Valley and the University of Washington have shown interest in both demoing and testing SENSOL’s product at various locations during Summer 2020. So the next time you cross the street, your every step will be illuminated.   SENSOL Logo   [post_title] => Student-led team "SENSOL Systems" places 3rd in Science & Technology Showcase [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => sensolsystems [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-02-13 15:49:56 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-13 23:49:56 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=16862 [menu_order] => 2 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 16848 [post_author] => 25 [post_date] => 2020-02-11 14:52:26 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-11 22:52:26 [post_content] => [caption id="" align="alignnone" width="800"] James Rosenthal (left) and Charlie Kelly deliver a weekly podcast that unpacks a complex science paper that has attracted astonishing or absurd headlines.[/caption] Paper Boys logo "Science papers delivered weekly"Two UW engineering Ph.D. students, ECE's James Rosenthal and A&A's Charlie Kelly, co-host the "Paper Boys" podcast, a weekly unpacking of science papers with astonishing or absurd headlines covered in the media. “Early humans hooked up with other species a whole bunch” and “An alien spaceship may have passed by Earth in 2017, Harvard scientists say” are real headlines from respected media outlets. Were these headlines accurate? Each week, "Paper Boys" presents a science paper covered in the media, then they explore the complex research behind the headlines and break down whether the flashy headline was justified. The result is a fun, engaging but didactic conversation uncovering obscure phenomena. UW's Amy Sprague interviewed James and Charlie recently about their novel podcast.

One of the strengths of the podcast is the fun rapport you two have. How did you meet?

James: We actually met on the first day of grad school. We randomly sat next to each other at an orientation at the library. Our first conversation quickly steered towards outer space, and it was instant friendship after that. Our shared passion for science and exploration was a big driver for starting the podcast. Charlie: The reason we get along so well on air is that what you hear is only 1% of our actual time spent together. Our friendship was forged over beverages, squash courts, and hiking trails for years before we started the show. People are always surprised we have pastimes together that are completely unrelated to podcasting — like scouring the UW campus for the coolest trees we can find (seriously people, go check out the Brockman Memorial Tree Tour).
  "Our friendship was forged over beverages, squash courts, and hiking trails for years before we started the show." – Charlie
 
  "Our shared passion for science and exploration was a big driver for starting the podcast." – James
 

What was your motivation for this podcast? Was there a particular headline that misrepresented research that made the decision for you?

Charlie: We had been toying with the idea of starting a “journal club” for a while, where the idea was to get together over a beer every week and chat about a paper one of us had read. At the same time, we had a radio show on Rainy Dawg where we pretended to be astronauts and talked about space news a lot. Eventually we realized we could combine the two and have a sort of journal club in radio format, and Paper Boys was born. James: Another motivation for the podcast was to help our audience see the personal, human element behind research. After reading many popular news articles about science, it is easy to feel distanced from the seemingly cold, objective “researchers” mentioned in the articles. We felt this distance might be one factor contributing to popular distrust of science. In reality, these “researchers” are people who have lives, friends, and families, and who generally want to make the world a better place. By discussing the research in a warmer, more casual way, we hope people can feel more connected to interesting, meaningful science.
“After reading many popular news articles about science, it is easy to feel distanced from the seemingly cold, objective 'researchers' mentioned in the articles. We felt this distance might be one factor contributing to popular distrust of science. In reality, these 'researchers' are people who have lives, friends, and families, and who generally want to make the world a better place." – James

Are there episodes or findings that really stand out for you?

James: So many! People I know outside of Charlie are probably sick of hearing me talk about new facts I learned from doing the show. There are of course some papers that simply reinforce an expected outcome (e.g. sleep is important and you should get enough), but every paper introduces some surprising, insightful nuances. If I had to pick off the top of my head though, I would choose the episodes “Is Planet 9 Actually a Black Hole?” and “Can You Prove You’re Human in One Word?” Charlie:  Another thing that makes episodes stand out is when the audience is really engaged. We had an episode covering the quintessential pop science debate: “Are eggs really bad for you?” That was almost a year ago and we still hear from fans that we ruined breakfast for them. Charlie's and James' favorite episodes:

How do you prepare individually and together for each episode?

Charlie: We decided early on that each episode would have one of us select the paper and research it in-depth, while the other person learns live on air and asks questions. It’s a good format for us because we alternate roles every week, so we can do a lot of the prep work individually before getting together to record. When I’m researching a paper, I personally like to print it out and read it at the IMA — though admittedly I probably look silly trying to use a highlighter on the StairMaster.

Has your process evolved as you’ve gained more experience?

James: I would say our process for reading papers has changed. At the start of grad school, it would take Charlie and I nearly a full week to read through a single research paper. We’d have to go through and find the definition of nearly every other word. Now for a paper on an unfamiliar topic, it might take 1-2 hours to read and take notes. The big epiphany was realizing that all scientific papers have a lot of similarities, in content and structure. Now when we start reading a paper on a completely foreign topic, we can break it down much faster. We just ask ourselves the basics, like “OK, the terminology is different, but how did the authors apply the scientific method? What’s their hypothesis? What are their methods? What did they find?”

Have any authors of the papers you’ve featured contacted you?

Charlie: Actually yes! Occasionally we will share the episode with the authors of the paper we covered and we usually get a great response. We’ve also had authors tweet at us out of the blue, which is exciting because it means someone else shared it with them.

Challenge! Write a headline-worthy of Paper Boys for each other's research.

Charlie: “Tiny wireless brain implant could soon be used for monkey mind control.” And like any good science headline, there’s a good chance I’ve grossly misrepresented James’ work. James: Haha nice, Charlie! That gives me more credit than I deserve, but I’ll take it. Here is my best news headline summary of Charlie’s research: “Plasma aerocapture technology could open unexplored reaches of the solar system — and the possibility of discovering alien life.”
Story courtesy of Amy Sprague | PM & Communications | UW Aero & Astro [post_title] => Ph.D. students' podcast "Paper Boys" delivers [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => paper-boys [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-02-11 14:54:45 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-11 22:54:45 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=16848 [menu_order] => 3 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 16802 [post_author] => 25 [post_date] => 2020-02-06 10:21:26 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-06 18:21:26 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_16806" align="alignnone" width="920"] With continuous tracking, AuraRing can pick up handwriting — potentially for short responses to text messages. Dennis Wise / University of Washington[/caption]

Smart technology keeps getting smaller. There are smartphones, smartwatches and now, smart rings - devices that allow someone to use simple finger gestures to control other technology.

Researchers at the University of Washington have created AuraRing, a ring and wristband combination that can detect the precise location of someone’s index finger and continuously track hand movements. The ring emits a signal that can be picked up on the wristband, which can then identify the position and orientation of the ring — and the finger it’s attached to. The research team published these results Dec. 11 in Proceedings of the ACM on Interactive, Mobile, Wearable and Ubiquitous Technologies.
“We’re thinking about the next generation of computing platforms,” said co-lead author Eric Whitmire, who completed this research as a doctoral student at the Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering. “We wanted a tool that captures the fine-grain manipulation we do with our fingers — not just a gesture or where your finger’s pointed, but something that can track your finger completely.”
AuraRing is composed of a coil of wire wrapped 800 times around a 3D-printed ring. A current running through the wire generates a magnetic field, which is picked up by three sensors on the wristband. Based on what values the sensors detect, the researchers can continuously identify the exact position of the ring in space. From there, they can determine where the user’s finger is located.  

The ring in AuraRing (left) is composed of a coil of wire wrapped 800 times around a 3D printed ring. The AuraRing wristband (right) uses three sensors (one shown here: white box in the lower left) to pick up the magnetic field generated by the ring. Credit: Dennis Wise/University of Washington

  “To have continuous tracking in other smart rings you’d have to stream all the data using wireless communication. That part consumes a lot of power, which is why a lot of smart rings only detect gestures and send those specific commands,” said co-lead author Farshid Salemi Parizi, a doctoral student in the Electrical & Computer Engineering Department. “But AuraRing’s ring consumes only 2.3 milliwatts of power, which produces an oscillating magnetic field that the wristband can constantly sense. In this way, there’s no need for any communication from the ring to the wristband.” With continuous tracking, AuraRing can pick up handwriting — potentially for short responses to text messages — or allow someone to have a virtual reality avatar hand that mimics what they’re doing with their actual hand. In addition, because AuraRing uses magnetic fields, it can still track hands even when they are out of sight, such as when a user is on a crowded bus and can’t reach their phone. [caption id="attachment_16805" align="alignnone" width="908"] AuraRing can allow someone to have a virtual reality avatar hand that mimics what they’re doing with their actual hand. Dennis Wise / University of Washington[/caption] “We can also easily detect taps, flicks or even a small pinch versus a big pinch,” Salemi Parizi said. “This gives you added interaction space. For example, if you write ‘hello,’ you could use a flick or a pinch to send that data. Or on a Mario-like game, a pinch could make the character jump, but a flick could make them super jump.” The researchers designed AuraRing to be ready to use as soon as it comes out of the box and not be dependent on a specific user. They tested the system on 12 participants with different hand sizes. The team compared the actual location of a participant’s finger to where AuraRing said it was. Most of the time, the system’s tracked location agreed with the actual location within a few millimeters. This ring and wristband combination could be useful for more than games and smartphones, the team said.
“Because AuraRing continuously monitors hand movements and not just gestures, it provides a rich set of inputs that multiple industries could take advantage of,” said senior author Shwetak Patel, a professor in both the Electrical & Computer Engineering Department and the Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering. “For example, AuraRing could detect the onset of Parkinson’s disease by tracking subtle hand tremors or help with stroke rehabilitation by providing feedback on hand movement exercises.”
The technology behind AuraRing is something that could be easily added to smartwatches and other wristband devices, according to the team.
“It’s all about super powers,” Salemi Parizi said. “You would still have all the capabilities that today’s smartwatches have to offer, but when you want the additional benefits, you just put on your ring.”
The team has a related project called Aura, a small controller for mobile VR devices that has the location-tracking accuracy of desktop VR devices. This research was funded by UW Reality Lab, Facebook, Google and Futurewei. For more information, contact Salemi Parizi at farshid@cs.washington.edu, Whitmire at emwhit@cs.washington.edu and Patel at shwetak@cs.washington.edu. This article originally appeared in UW Today, by Sarah McQuate. [post_title] => The one ring — to track your finger’s location [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => aura_ring [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-02-11 14:54:07 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-11 22:54:07 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=16802 [menu_order] => 4 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 16490 [post_author] => 25 [post_date] => 2019-12-12 16:27:37 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-12-13 00:27:37 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_16492" align="alignright" width="596"] Jesus Contreras Ocaña at the MOPGA 2nd Anniversary Event[/caption] ECE Alum Jesus Contreras Ocaña, who graduated from UW with his masters in Electrical Engineering in 2015 and Ph.D. in Power Systems in 2018, recently attended the second anniversary event of French President Emmanuel Macron's "Make Our Planet Great Again" initiative. This past October, Contreras Ocaña concluded a one-year post-doctoral research fellowship at the Université de Grenoble Alpes and G2Elab, where he conducted research related to microgrids for the Eco-SESA program. His postdoctoral research was funded by the Make Our Planet Great Again program. Currently, he works in Brussels, Belgium as a Smart Energy Consultant at ENGIE Impact (Tractebel). The Make Our Planet Great Again program was launched on June 1, 2017, following the decision of the United States to leave the Paris Agreement on climate change. It is a call to researchers and students, entrepreneurs, associations and NGOs, students and all civil society to mobilize and join France to lead the fight against global warming.
"If we want to prepare collective changes, adapt our behavior, we need science. We need students. We need researchers," stated President Macron.
[caption id="attachment_16493" align="alignright" width="595"] Jesus Contreras Ocaña's Selfie with French President Emmanuel Macron[/caption] To celebrate the second anniversary of this program, Contreras Ocaña was invited to a ceremony at the Elysée Palace in Paris, where he and other invitees discussed the importance of climate change-related research, the Make Our Planet Great Again program, and how it could be improved for future cohorts. Contreras Ocaña was also lucky enough to catch a selfie with President Macron. Congratulations, Jesus, on your continued success and commitment to improving the conditions of the climate crisis. [post_title] => Alum Jesus Contreras Ocaña attends Make Our Planet Great Again event [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => jesus-ocana-planet [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-12 17:28:08 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-13 01:28:08 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=16490 [menu_order] => 6 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 16561 [post_author] => 25 [post_date] => 2019-12-18 11:32:35 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-12-18 19:32:35 [post_content] =>

The Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering’s 2019 Dean W. Lytle Endowed Lecture Series videos are now available! The Lytle Lecture Series is the department’s premier annual event, featuring internationally renowned researchers in the field of communications, signal processing, control systems and machine learning. This year we were extremely excited to have the world-renowned applied mathematician and research scientist, Dr. Stéphane Mallat, as our guest speaker. Dr. Mallat is known for his fundamental work in wavelet theory, with major impact in machine learning, signal processing, music synthesis, harmonic analysis and image segmentation. Click to read the Abstract on Dr. Mallat's presentation, “Mathematical Mysteries of Deep Neural Networks” and watch the full recording of the 2019 Lytle Lecture below!

The Lytle Lecture Series was hosted by ECE Professor Les Atlas, and ECE Professor and Associate Chair for Research and Entrepreneurship, Maryam Fazel. The lecture series was made possible by a generous endowment from the Lytle family in honor of the late ECE Professor, Dean W. Lytle.

Lytle Lecture 2019 - Dr. Stéphane Mallat

If the video doesn't display properly, click here.  
 

ECE Colloquium Series 2019 - Dr. Stéphane Mallat

Professor Mallat also presented a lecture earlier that morning on “Interpretable Deep Networks for Classification, Generation and Physics” for the ECE Colloquium Series. Below is a video of that lecture. If the video doesn't display properly, click here.     [post_title] => Watch Professor Stéphane Mallat's full Lytle Lecture Series videos now! [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => stephane-mallat-lytle-videos [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-19 10:50:14 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-19 18:50:14 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.ece.uw.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=16561 [menu_order] => 7 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 6 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 16949 [post_author] => 25 [post_date] => 2020-02-18 10:45:28 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-18 18:45:28 [post_content] => For Chase Deitner, competing and engineering are all part of his daily routine. From racing for UW's Mens Rowing team in "long pair races" in the morning, to taking electrical engineering exams during the day, and then running a stadium in the afternoon, Chase always finds himself striving to be the best. Living in Perth, Australia as a teenager, Chase decided to study at the University of Washington for its strong, competitive engineering program. "Both of my parents were engineers, so I knew I wanted to become one as well," recalls Chase.
"I knew UW had different engineering programs and it would be a good place for me to figure out what type I wanted to specialize in."
Chase had been rowing for his high school team for a couple of years, but because of his size and erg scores, he knew he would not be recruited at the college level. However, Chase loved the community and the competition that came with rowing, so he wanted to continue in college no matter what. His plan was always to walk-on to the team wherever he ended up. "I had absolutely no idea how good the UW team was before coming here," Chase says. "All I knew was they were a Division I school, but I didn't really know what that meant either." So, Chase showed up to the UW men's rowing team tryouts with dozens of other guys who were much bigger and stronger than him. [caption id="attachment_16953" align="alignright" width="741"] Chase Deitner holds up a 'W' after winning bronze at the World Rowing Under-23 Championships in the men's lightweight quad sculls in 2018.[/caption] "The tryouts were the most challenging, stressful and competitive two weeks I had ever gone through," he recalls. In his third year on the team now, Chase has raced at the Pac-12 championships twice, once at the IRA championships and once at the World Rowing Under-23 Championships, where he won the bronze medal in the men's lightweight quad sculls in 2018. Aside from his success on the water, Chase also has the team's highest GPA as an electrical engineering major. Chase chose that particular major because of how competitive the application and acceptance process is.
"I really enjoy the competitive aspect of my major," Chase says, "I enjoy learning too, but the competitiveness that comes with the work, problem-solving, and exams is what makes it fun."
Whether it's a race on the water or a midterm exam, Chase likes to win. While staying competitive, Chase has found that the best way to manage, succeed and enjoy everything he does is to stay focused and present. "I try to be where I am at all times, whether I am studying, erging, racing or hanging out with friends, I try to commit a hundred percent of my time to that one moment," says Chase, "and that makes everything much more effective, and also more enjoyable." Rowing has taught Chase how to enjoy the competition and to always try to perform at his best, both on and off the water. [caption id="attachment_16952" align="alignleft" width="494"] Chase Deitner rowing[/caption]                  
This story was originally featured in UW Rowing's "Built In Washington" series by women's team varsity coxswain Marley Avritt.
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