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CHIPS News & Media

The CHIPS and Science Act of 2022 is helping UW ECE faculty researchers make groundbreaking and exciting new advancements in chip and semiconductor technologies. Read about the latest developments and related news stories below!


A laser printer for photonic chips

A research team led by UW ECE and Physics Professor Mo Li has invented a new way to print and reconfigure photonic integrated circuits (microchips) using a speedy, low-cost device about the size of a conventional desktop laser printer. More>>

An illustration of a laser beam engraving a microchip in a black box frame, plus an inset showing the photonic chip circuitry

This device could enable students and researchers to bypass expensive nanofabrication facilities and produce photonic integrated circuits almost anywhere. The technology also has possible industrial applications. Illustration by Haoquin Deng | UW ECE.


A new kind of chip for wireless communication

A UW ECE research team led by Professor Chris Rudell has designed an innovative computer chip that can send and receive large amounts of data at high speeds while minimizing signal distortion and conserving the limited spectrum available for wireless communication. More>>

Colorful, close-up view of microchip

A UW ECE graduate student research team, advised and led by Professor Chris Rudell, has designed an innovative computer chip that can send and receive large amounts of data at high speeds while minimizing signal distortion and conserving the limited spectrum available for wireless communication. Shown above: A close-up view of the chip designed by the team


Chips, science and engineering

Dean Nancy Allbritton explains what the CHIPS and Science Act means for the College of Engineering, the UW and the state of Washington. More>>


A new kind of chip for quantum technology

A UW research team led by UW ECE and Physics Associate Professor Arka Majumdar has moved quantum technology development a significant step ahead, demonstrating a new kind of silicon photonic chip that could work as a solid foundation for building a quantum simulator, one with useful applications in the real world. More>>

An up-close, colorful image of chip circuitry

A UW research team led by UW ECE and Physics Associate Professor Arka Majumdar has moved quantum technology development a significant step ahead, demonstrating a new kind of silicon photonic chip that could work as a solid foundation for building a quantum simulator, one with useful applications in the real world. Shown above: An optical image of the electrically controlled coupled cavity array in the team’s silicon photonic chip. The image depicts the wiring structure and optical micrograph of the coupled cavity array. This visual, provided by Abhi Saxena, is an edge detected output that uses an optical microscope image as an input.


How UW ECE is ready for the CHIPS and Science Act

The CHIPS and Science Act of 2022 is making historic investments in semiconductor research, workforce development and manufacturing. Learn how UW ECE is prepared and well-positioned to leverage these opportunities. More>>

Closeup of a gold microchip mounted on a green circuit board

A recently designed microchip from the lab of UW ECE Professor Chris Rudell (in gold, mounted to the green circuit board shown above). This chip is a 2.4 GHz full-duplex transceiver, which employs multiple self-interference cancellation techniques to improve signal fidelity and efficiently use limited bandwidth. The chip has a broad range of applications, including use in satellite communications and radar, shipping, aviation and space industries, and 5G technologies. Photo by Ryan Hoover / UW ECE


Sajjad Moazeni receives Google Research Scholar Program award to develop faster computer networks for AI and machine learning in the cloud

UW ECE Assistant Professor Sajjad Moazeni is developing a new type of computer chip for use in data centers. This “smart” chip will help make AI and machine learning applications faster, more powerful and energy efficient. More>>

UW Assistant Professor Sajjad Moazeni standing with his arms folded, outdoors in the UW Quad

UW ECE Assistant Professor Sajjad Moazeni (shown above) is developing a new type of computer chip for use in data centers that support cloud computing. This “smart” chip will help to make AI and machine learning applications faster, more powerful and energy efficient. Photo by Ryan Hoover | UW ECE


New ‘eyes’ for self-driving cars

A UW ECE research team led by UW ECE and Physics Professor Mo Li has invented a new type of light detection and ranging, or LiDAR, technology that helps autonomous vehicles “see” distant objects. This on-chip device also has a wide range of other potential applications, including use in robotic systems found in agriculture, global supply chains, and medical imaging. More>>

Illustration of computer chip sending out a scanning laser to detect a car far in the distance

A UW ECE research team has invented a new type of light detection and ranging, or LiDAR, technology that helps robotic systems in autonomous vehicles discern distant objects with clarity and precision. This new form of LiDAR is integrated onto a computer chip. The chip uses sound waves running over its surface to steer a laser beam, much like a searchlight, so self-driving cars can “see” objects (such as pedestrians and other vehicles) that are far in the distance. Illustration is by Bingzhao Li and Qixuan Lin, courtesy of the Laboratory of Photonic Systems at the UW.


UPWARDS for the Future

The U.S.-Japan University Partnership for Workforce Advancement and Research & Development in Semiconductors (UPWARDS) for the Future is a collaboration between six U.S. universities and five Japanese universities, working with industry partners, to provide advanced training and research opportunities that will grow the semiconductor workforce and help the U.S. and Japan build more of the semiconductors that both nations need.